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Created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was a brilliant London-based consulting detective, famous for his intellectual prowess and powers of deductive reasoning. His Last Bow is the fourth of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short story collections and features eight mysterious tales: "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge," "The Adventure Created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was a brilliant London-based consulting detective, famous for his intellectual prowess and powers of deductive reasoning. His Last Bow is the fourth of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short story collections and features eight mysterious tales: "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge," "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box," "The Adventure of the Red Circle," "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans," "The Adventure of the Dying Detective," "The Disappearance of Lady Francis Carfax," "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot," and the title story, "His Last Bow." It is in this last story that Holmes emerges from a retirement of beekeeping to stop the spy Baron Von Bork from disclosing secret English documents at the approach of World War I.


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Created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was a brilliant London-based consulting detective, famous for his intellectual prowess and powers of deductive reasoning. His Last Bow is the fourth of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short story collections and features eight mysterious tales: "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge," "The Adventure Created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was a brilliant London-based consulting detective, famous for his intellectual prowess and powers of deductive reasoning. His Last Bow is the fourth of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short story collections and features eight mysterious tales: "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge," "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box," "The Adventure of the Red Circle," "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans," "The Adventure of the Dying Detective," "The Disappearance of Lady Francis Carfax," "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot," and the title story, "His Last Bow." It is in this last story that Holmes emerges from a retirement of beekeeping to stop the spy Baron Von Bork from disclosing secret English documents at the approach of World War I.

30 review for His Last Bow, with eBook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 84% | Very Good Notes: Precursor to the spy genre, it’s Holmes, Sherlock Holmes, secret agent, with more consequential and real world plots.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    His Last Bow collects eight Sherlock Holmes stories that first ran in The Strand Magazine from 1908 to 1913, as well as including the eponymous “His Last Bow”, which ran in 1917. (“The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is included in American editions of this collection; Brits will find that story in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes.) Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson are on the case yet again, with Watson serving as Holmes’ faithful biographer for seven of the eight stories collected here. The Br His Last Bow collects eight Sherlock Holmes stories that first ran in The Strand Magazine from 1908 to 1913, as well as including the eponymous “His Last Bow”, which ran in 1917. (“The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is included in American editions of this collection; Brits will find that story in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes.) Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson are on the case yet again, with Watson serving as Holmes’ faithful biographer for seven of the eight stories collected here. The British government under fire, women vanishing from holiday, severed ears turning up in the post of respectable women, and German spies are just the tip of the iceberg.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    The Sherlock Holmes collection that has the fewest number of short stories: 8. It is even a story-less in its British edition. This is called His Last Bow because it shares that title with its anchor (last) story. Other than that reason, I could not associate any of the other stories with Holmes bowing out as they all have the same ingredients or formula as the earlier Sherlock Holmes literary pieces. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge. John Scott Eccles consults Holmes and Watson regarding the deat The Sherlock Holmes collection that has the fewest number of short stories: 8. It is even a story-less in its British edition. This is called His Last Bow because it shares that title with its anchor (last) story. Other than that reason, I could not associate any of the other stories with Holmes bowing out as they all have the same ingredients or formula as the earlier Sherlock Holmes literary pieces. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge. John Scott Eccles consults Holmes and Watson regarding the death of his Spanish friend, Aloysius Garcia. Two Scotland detectives, Gregson and Baynes, join. Garcia’s murder happened in a place called Wisteria Lodge in Esher. The murderer turns out to be from another house that Holmes was able to deduce from reconnoitering. I loved the presence of gothic element but the reconnoitering is quite unlikely in my opinion. However, if the area is peopled only by whites and Murillo is the only one from Latin America, then I may be wrong. What I mean is that Murillo’s skin could have made him a highly noticeable target. – 2 STARS The Adventure of the Cardboard Box. Yuck, two severed human ears are inside the parcel sent to an old landlord, Miss Susan Cushing and Inspector Lestrade suspects that that this is a frank by his evicted tenants who are medical student. Holmes, as always, thinks differently and he proves that he is right. Quite ordinary but the straightforward narration plus the emotion of a wronged man made this story disquieting. For a while, I felt for the killer because his wife has a lover. Not that I could emphatize with him but Holmes held back the full information a bit there so I thought that the killer deserved my empathy. – 3 STARS The Adventure of the Red Circle. The kidnapper of Mrs. Warren’s husband is identified using the following facts: messages sent to Daily Gazette’s Agony column, hiding in a boxroom, the lantern signal and the knowledge of Italian language. Underground terrorist activities are also involved. Aside from Pinkerton that was also mentioned in his last novel, the Italian Mafia-like organization, Red Circle, is involved here but there is no connection between Pinkerton and Red Circle. Felt like an ordinary Holmes story. - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans. This is the last appearance of Mycroft, Holmes’ brother. Arthur Cadogan West is murdered and seven out of ten pages of the secret submarine plans are found with his corpse. If the 3 pages are found, the person can create a submarine that runs from Bruce to Partington. Mycroft provides information that led to the identification of the murderer near the railway. Unlike the first story in this collection, the reconnoitering of the neighborhood is plausible to identify the place where the killing happened. The reason is that the corpse is found by the railway tracks. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Dying Detective. Would you ever imagine Holmes getting sick? He died but he never got sick in the previous novels and short stories. In this one Holmes is said to have contacted a contagious Asian disease and Dr. Watson is called to tend on him. Watson arrives but Holmes tells him to wait up to 6pm. Holmes asks Watson to fetch Mr. Culverton Smith who Holmes has accused to have killed his nephew, Victor. I felt sad reading this novel at first because I thought all the while that Holmes was sick and could die. It was unthinkable for me and Sir Doyle was able to truly catch my interest. - 3 STARS The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax. Lady Frances is missing but Holmes is busy so he sends Watson to investigate. He proceeds with the investigation and finds out that Lady Frances has gone to Germany, met the Schlessinger couple and a big bearded man. Holmes telegraphs back asking of the condition of Mr. Schelessinger’s ear. Just like “Baskervilles,” this story has Watson in the forefront of action and Holmes relegated to the back burner. Or so I thought. Just like in “Baskervilles” Sir Doyle always keeps surprises up his sleeves. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot. Messrs. Tregennis and Roundhay consult Holmes because the former’s brothers (Owen and George) have gone mad and his sister (Brenda) died. During the investigation a cousin of the Tregennises, Dr. Sterndale, postpones his trip for the sake of the investigation. The following day, Tregannis himself is found dead by Dr. Sterndale. Who kills or turns the siblings? Read and find out for yourself. The Devil’s Foot is a chemical from a plant root in Africa. This is one of the best stories in this collection. Very engaging. - 4 STARS His Last Bow. Von Bork is a German spy is leaving Britain for Netherlands bringing with him a lot of valuable information that may be used by German during the first World War. His friend, Von Herling says that those can make him rather a hero. Von Bork is still not happy though. He is still waiting for another tip (naval signal). I will not tell you the rest of the story because as I do not give too much away. This one is very good though. I did not see “it” coming. Also, told in a third person, this felt different because all the other works in the canon are narrated by Watson (first person). This is said to have been written during the World War I to uplift the morale of the British soldiers so this is a spy story rather than the usual detective’s tale. Truly, a breath of fresh air. - 5 STARS On to the last collection of short stories called The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes and I will then be done with the whole Sherlock Holmes canon. Which canon I am planning to read next? I am contemplating between reading the whole works of Samuel Beckett (I have all of them) or maybe read the rest of the 11 books included in Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time. I am still collecting, little-by-little, the whole works of William Shakespeare so, even if I want to read him next, I still cannot do that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    RJ

    This short story collection is one of the finest and most even entries in the series. Subtitled "Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes," the brief preface indicates that Holmes has retired after his war service. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge - 4/5 - someone's past comes back to haunt him! No, really! The Adventure of the Cardboard Box - 4/5 - what's in the box? The Adventure of the Red Circle: by Arthur Conan Doyle - 4/5 - insert "circle of trust joke" here The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Pl This short story collection is one of the finest and most even entries in the series. Subtitled "Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes," the brief preface indicates that Holmes has retired after his war service. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge - 4/5 - someone's past comes back to haunt him! No, really! The Adventure of the Cardboard Box - 4/5 - what's in the box? The Adventure of the Red Circle: by Arthur Conan Doyle - 4/5 - insert "circle of trust joke" here The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans - 4/5 - although somewhat reminiscent of The Adventure of the Second Stain (even including the spy Oberstein) there's plenty for Holmes to do and even a couple of Mycroft appearances The Adventure of the Dying Detective - 4/5 - another fresh plot idea, and no one's past had to come back to haunt them! The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax - 4/5 - Holmes gets it wrong? Or does he...? Adventure of the Devil's Foot - 4/5 - Holmes solves cases even while on vacation His Last Bow -4/5 - Holmes emerges from retirement in support of the war effort

  5. 4 out of 5

    James Lafayette Tivendale

    This was pretty enjoyable read consisting of 8 short stories. Although they are arguably not as consitant and entertaining as Adventures of... and Return of... I would say half the stories here are very good. Devil's Foot was one of my favourites which was reminiscent of The Hound of The Baskervilles where Sherlock goes and explores on his own via long walks in strange places and leaves the readers in the dark before the big reveals following the masterful deductions he is famous for. I like the This was pretty enjoyable read consisting of 8 short stories. Although they are arguably not as consitant and entertaining as Adventures of... and Return of... I would say half the stories here are very good. Devil's Foot was one of my favourites which was reminiscent of The Hound of The Baskervilles where Sherlock goes and explores on his own via long walks in strange places and leaves the readers in the dark before the big reveals following the masterful deductions he is famous for. I like the way a couple of the stories; such as the above mentioned - lay the facts out and then you hear the perpetrators point of view and it questions your morality and original viewpoint which adds to the layers and the readers emotions at the finale of the short tale. The Dying Detective is very enjoyable but slightly predictive and I didn't really like The Last Bow - it seemed more of a statement than a story with the impending war approaching Europe. Sherlock and Watson's friendship is great as always (I am sure Sherlock even called it Love in one story!). I like the mechanisms of Watson's autobiographical presentation so the stories never seem repetitive. The cast that around our duo are great such as Lestrade, Mrs. Hudson and Gregson and some of the villians are notorious as would be expected. If you read these, like me - for Sherlock's genius, deduction and bizarre shenanigans mix with his relationship with his army doctor and biographer friend - then you will find a lot here to enjoy. I wouldn't start with this collection though. Adventures of.... and the Four full lengths should come first. Peace. x

  6. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This is the penultimate collection of Sherlock Holmes stories. I have spent my summer going through the Sherlock canon, and I am a bit sad to be nearing the end of my time with the great detective. Even though some of the stories are not the best mysteries, they have a certain charm to them that makes them endearing to read. In this collection, my favorites were "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans," "The Adventure of the Dying Detective," and "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot." The fina This is the penultimate collection of Sherlock Holmes stories. I have spent my summer going through the Sherlock canon, and I am a bit sad to be nearing the end of my time with the great detective. Even though some of the stories are not the best mysteries, they have a certain charm to them that makes them endearing to read. In this collection, my favorites were "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans," "The Adventure of the Dying Detective," and "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot." The final piece, "His Last Bow," is unique in that it is actually a spy story set during World War I, and it is told in the third person, instead of from Dr. Watson's point of view. In this book we also learn that Holmes has retired and is now keeping bees at a small farm. Since I have spent so many weeks with Sherlock, I have been contemplating the vastness of his influence. So many modern detective shows and stories can be traced back to Doyle's creation. Why was he so iconic? It's true we appreciate his genius, just as we admire those who can see through the lies to the truth, who can follow the trail amidst the undergrowth, who can find the solution to the mystery. But I think Sherlock would not have been quite so memorable if it had not been for his friendship with Dr. Watson. Watson always helped Holmes -- he humanized him. (He even saved Holmes' life a few times!) Sherlock always gets the praise, but I wish I could give Watson a pat on the back, too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Within this small collection are a few stories in which Doyle seems to have been going through his motions (and who could blame him). But as his most famous creation says more than once in this volume, “We must possess our souls in patience”; and that patience is rewarded, as the collection also contains some of Doyle's finest stories, including a couple that break his own mold.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    Okay so I own 5 Sherlock books and this is the first one I’ve read. WOW I AM SPEECHLESS! I wish I read them sooner. The adventure of the dying detective was absolutely superb. That story definitely had me hook from the start. Some of the stories were a little harder to get into than most but I really enjoyed them all either way. I really can’t wait to read the other 4.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Another Collection of Holmesian Adventures 28 May 2017 Since I’m trying to finish off this massively huge volume of Sherlock Holmes short stories before I go back to Adelaide (namely because it happens to be my father’s), I thought it was time to make my way through the fourth collection. Unlike the other collections, Watson indicated that this collection is actually a collection of adventures that occurred previously, and aren’t actually a new series, namely because in the previous collection th Another Collection of Holmesian Adventures 28 May 2017 Since I’m trying to finish off this massively huge volume of Sherlock Holmes short stories before I go back to Adelaide (namely because it happens to be my father’s), I thought it was time to make my way through the fourth collection. Unlike the other collections, Watson indicated that this collection is actually a collection of adventures that occurred previously, and aren’t actually a new series, namely because in the previous collection the final adventure had Sherlock living in the country tending bees since he had retired of the life of the detective. As such, we jump back to learn of some futher adventures that our consulting detective became involved in. Once again, murder seems to be the major theme throughout these stories, which as I previously mentioned, I found to be a bit of a shame because I actually preferred the adventures that either didn’t involve a murder, or weren’t even a crime afterall. However, I suspect that murder would be Holmes’ bread and butter, and due to the incredibly serious nature of the crime, would be the problem that the police generally approach him with. Not that the police generally approach him because you still get the impression that Lestrade believes that he is the greatest cop in existance and all Holmes ever does is get in the way. The interesting thing is that in my past employment I have worked with private detectives, or more specifically investigators (as they are known here in Australia). As it turns out, the bread and butter of the investigator is generally insurance work, or spying on husbands/wives, to see if they are up to any mischief. Okay, they also do missing person work, but normally because the missing person owes somebody money, and the creditor really doesn’t want to let the debtor off the hook. Once again this is particular with the insurance industry because a simple mistake can suddenly have you owing hundreds of thousands of dollars to an insurance company, and suddenly you find that debt collectors are hounding your every move – and in this interconnected world of Facebook, Twitter, and a mobile phone that wants to share your location with the entire world, hiding from such people has become ever more difficult. One final thought though, other than the fact that I’m going to have to write a blog post about my trip to the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London (though I have so many blog posts to actually write that this one will probably end up falling to the wayside pretty quickly), is the last story. This one actually bucks the trend in that we have the story set not only as a postscript, but also after he has retired. Actually, the final story in the previous volume was the case as well. However, this story is set at the start of World War I and we have some German spies preparing to head back to Berlin. Well, that is until Holmes steps out of the woodwork, reveals himself, and sends them packing (or at least arrests them). In fact this story was probably my favourite story in the whole collection, though it does turn Holmes into a bit of a superhero. I guess it happens to be one of those stories that was written after the outbreak of the war, or at least fairly shortly afterwards. In a way it reminds me a bit of the superhero comics, or even the Hollywood action films, which reveals that deep desire within ourselves for some hero to come out of nowhere and to save us from an external threat – in this case Germany. Okay, while Holmes was not able to single handedly defeat Germany, he was able to bring down a massive spy operation, as well as feeding the Germans false information. Mind you, I always find it funny when Hollywood creates these heroes that go out and save us from the bad people, when in the end what we really need is a hero to come along and save us from ourselves.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    There are times when only certain types of books will do, when one is feeling in need of some consoling literary friend. At such times I often reach for Agatha Christie, although another old and comforting literary companion is Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. This fairly slight volume contains eight fascinating Holmes stories, each of them a fairly decent length, utterly perfect to curl up with on a chilly December evening. I adore the character of Holmes, it matches exactly the mood that Doyle cr There are times when only certain types of books will do, when one is feeling in need of some consoling literary friend. At such times I often reach for Agatha Christie, although another old and comforting literary companion is Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. This fairly slight volume contains eight fascinating Holmes stories, each of them a fairly decent length, utterly perfect to curl up with on a chilly December evening. I adore the character of Holmes, it matches exactly the mood that Doyle creates so perfectly in each story. The tension and fear that lies beneath a rarefied Englishness, the dense fogs that swirl outside the windows of Baker Street, while a great mind is figuring out the unfathomable. In my personal favourite 'The Adventure of the Devil's Foot' Holmes and Watson find themselves in a tiny Cornish village, where a woman has been apparently terrified to death, and two o her brothers left raving mad. In the final title story, a tale not narrated by Watson, the two old friends are brought back together some time after Holmes' retirement, it is August 1914. Although rather different in tome to the preceding stories it is a nice quiet finale.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ferdy

    A fairly good collection of Sherlock stories - I probably would have enjoyed them more though if I hadn't been binge reading the series as it made them rather predictable and formulaic. The last story was different than the others though, which I liked, but it did feel somewhat odd and out of place as it was set much later than the other cases and instead of the usual telegrams and carriages, it was all telephones and cars. I'm hoping the next lot of stories are set later on as well, it would ma A fairly good collection of Sherlock stories - I probably would have enjoyed them more though if I hadn't been binge reading the series as it made them rather predictable and formulaic. The last story was different than the others though, which I liked, but it did feel somewhat odd and out of place as it was set much later than the other cases and instead of the usual telegrams and carriages, it was all telephones and cars. I'm hoping the next lot of stories are set later on as well, it would make a nice change of pace.

  12. 5 out of 5

    russell barnes

    So, as I said previously, Not the last Sherlock Holmes book, although chronologically the last as it finishes at the dawn of The Great War. 'Great' as in 'Huge' rather than 'Spiffing'... Anyhoo... Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are taking a trip across a desert by hot-air balloon. There are not many landmarks; so eventually, they become lost. Luckily, while flying quite low, they see a man. Holmes shouts, "Sir, could you please tell me where we are?" The man looks up, ponders for a moment, and then So, as I said previously, Not the last Sherlock Holmes book, although chronologically the last as it finishes at the dawn of The Great War. 'Great' as in 'Huge' rather than 'Spiffing'... Anyhoo... Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are taking a trip across a desert by hot-air balloon. There are not many landmarks; so eventually, they become lost. Luckily, while flying quite low, they see a man. Holmes shouts, "Sir, could you please tell me where we are?" The man looks up, ponders for a moment, and then answers, "Gentlemen, you are in a hot-air balloon!" At this moment, a burst of wind picks up the balloon and carries it away. Holmes turns to Watson and asks: "My friend, do you know who that man is?" "No, Holmes, of course not!" "He's a mathematician!" "Holmes, that's incredible! But *how* do you know?" "It's very simple, Watson. First of all, the man thought before giving us an answer. Secondly, his answer was absolutely correct. And thirdly, the answer he gave us was of no practical use, whatsoever!" take that maths

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pedro

    Libro bastante entretenido. Eso sí, creo que estoy siendo algo generoso con las cuatro estrellas porque si bien lo disfruté, ninguno de los relatos me llegó a encantar como esperaba. Pero por ahora lo dejaré así hasta que lea esta colección desde el primer tomo y vuelva a leer este. Ha sido una buena primera experiencia leyendo a Arthur Conan Doyle.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    His Last Bow: 8 Stories (Sherlock Holmes, #8), Arthur Conan Doyle

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This might be my favorite of the Holmes short story collections so far. Perhaps that's a sign that Doyle was becoming a sharper writer the more he wrote, or perhaps more judicious in which stories he decided to publish. Or it might just be that he wrote with more of a gothic bent, and I really enjoy gothic lit! Brief reviews: Wisteria Lodge – 3* – A lengthy, two-part story that breezes by pretty quickly, but which I apparently didn't find particularly memorable because I struggle to recall detail This might be my favorite of the Holmes short story collections so far. Perhaps that's a sign that Doyle was becoming a sharper writer the more he wrote, or perhaps more judicious in which stories he decided to publish. Or it might just be that he wrote with more of a gothic bent, and I really enjoy gothic lit! Brief reviews: Wisteria Lodge – 3* – A lengthy, two-part story that breezes by pretty quickly, but which I apparently didn't find particularly memorable because I struggle to recall details even after reading Wikipedia's plot synopsis! The Cardboard Box – 4* – This one, on the other hand, is definitely a memorable story, what with the two severed ears that arrive in the titular box. Unusually gruesome for a Holmes story, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. The Red Circle – 4* – Another in one of Doyle's favorite genres: the offer that's too good to be true, which goes all the way back to The Red-Headed League and includes excellent stories such as The Solitary Cyclist. Anyway, this one is a solid contributor to the corpus by including another favorite element from other stories: the shadowy international organization. The Bruce-Partington Plans – 5* – One of the all-time best Holmes stories, imo. The Dying Detective – 5* – A particularly unique and excellent example of Holmes' mastery of disguises. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax – 4* – Casual sexism aside, this story has a thrilling conclusion featuring the last-second interruption of a funeral that would have buried the victim alive. The Devil's Foot – 5* – Another of Doyle's best, with a terrific gothic element in the pall of horror etched on the faces of the dead and the madness of the survivors. His Last Bow: An Epilogue – 3* – An extremely unusual third-person story, and overall not bad. Holmes is such a creature of Victorian London that seeing him interacting with World War I feels disjointed, but that's not Doyle's fault. These later stories show Holmes and Watson increasingly interacting with a mechanized world that was only just coming into existence when they began their adventures.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dani Jade

    His Last Bow is a collection of 7 short stories. It is my seventh Sherlock Holmes book and my fourth of the short story collections, and the shortest by far with 5-6 less stories than the previous 3 collections. Unfortunately, it is also probably my least favourite Sherlock Holmes read. It took me much longer to get through than the others. Some stories I did really enjoy, but there were some that just didn't grab me. The 7 stories are: - The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge - The Adventure of the Bruc His Last Bow is a collection of 7 short stories. It is my seventh Sherlock Holmes book and my fourth of the short story collections, and the shortest by far with 5-6 less stories than the previous 3 collections. Unfortunately, it is also probably my least favourite Sherlock Holmes read. It took me much longer to get through than the others. Some stories I did really enjoy, but there were some that just didn't grab me. The 7 stories are: - The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge - The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans - The Adventure of the Devil's Foot - The Adventure of the Red Circle - The Adventure of Lady Frances Carfax - The Adventure of the Dying Detective - His Last Bow

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Beaumont

    I totally enjoyed this penultimate volume of Sherlock Holmes short stories, not as long as the previous volumes, but just as entertaining. My favorite stories in this book are "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans," "The Adventure of the Dying Detective," "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot," and "His Last Bow." Now I have only one volume to go in my reread of the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Charlie-Dee

    Really enjoyed this set of stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    Enjoyable as always.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tara♥

    I'm listening to Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Audio Collection narrated by Stephen Fry and this is the eight book in the collection. Part 5 - Chapter 20 (The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge Part 1) Part 6 - Chapter 1 (The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge Part 2) - Chapter 7 The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge: Chapter 20 and Chapter 1 4 Stars “I’m bound to say that I make nothing of the note except that there was something on hand, and that a woman, as usual, was at the bottom of it.” Inspector Baynes may I'm listening to Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Audio Collection narrated by Stephen Fry and this is the eight book in the collection. Part 5 - Chapter 20 (The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge Part 1) Part 6 - Chapter 1 (The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge Part 2) - Chapter 7 The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge: Chapter 20 and Chapter 1 4 Stars “I’m bound to say that I make nothing of the note except that there was something on hand, and that a woman, as usual, was at the bottom of it.” Inspector Baynes may have won the affections of Holmes but he certainly didn't win any from me. The story was very good and the mystery very entertaining though. The Adventure of the Red Circle: Chapter 2 4 stars Another very entertaining case. I liked the addition of the mafia and how it all came about. The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans: Chapter 3 5 stars One of the more famous cases I think. I've always found this case to be clever and anything with Mycroft Holmes is welcomed by me. I particular like how Sherlock openly admits that Mycroft is a better mind than he himself. We don't see much humble Sherlock in the later stories so it's nice to see him make an appearance every once in a while. The Adventure of the Dying Detective: Chapter 4 5 stars One of my favourites. BUT "The landlady stood in the deepest awe of him and never dared to interfere with him, however outrageous his proceedings might seem. She was fond of him, too, for he had a remarkable gentleness and courtesy in his dealings with women. He disliked and distrusted the sex, but he was always a chivalrous opponent." Is it my imagination or is His Last Bow turning out to be the most sexist Sherlock Holmes yet? What on earth happened to Arthur Conan Doyle in the run up to 1917? Yes, Holmes was never overly fond of women but so far we have had some kind of derogatory remark towards women in each story in this collection. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax: Chapter 5 5 stars “One of the most dangerous classes in the world,” said he, “is the drifting and friendless woman. She is the most harmless and often the most useful of mortals, but she is the inevitable inciter of crime in others. She is helpless. She is migratory. She has sufficient means to take her from country to country and from hotel to hotel. She is lost, as often as not, in a maze of obscure pensions and boardinghouses. She is a stray chicken in a world of foxes. When she is gobbled up she is hardly missed. I much fear that some evil has come to the Lady Frances Carfax.” Another humdinger of a quote. This case was actually incredibly exciting and had me captivated. Holmes kind of let the ball drop but it all turned out well in the end. Adding this one to my favourites list I think. The Adventure of the Devil's Foot: Chapter 6 5 stars A trip to Cornwall for Holmes' health leads to a most interesting case. I can't see Holmes having a problem with his nerves though. It seems wrong somehow. Still this one felt very supernatural like and was very atmospheric also a little sad in the end. His Last Bow: An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes: Chapter 7 4 stars “Good old Watson! You are the one fixed point in a changing age. There’s an east wind coming all the same, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it’s God’s own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared." A different narrative for this one and I'm not sure I loved it. Also, why is Holmes tending to bees without Watson? What the actual? I don't like it. His Last Bow is the harbinger to the Great War and sets the stage very well. It's also the last chronological instalment of the series which makes Holmes' hanging about with bees WITHOUT his Watson all the more upsetting for me. They should be together. Why wasn't Watson in the country attending to a small practice while Holmes wrote his study on bees? I'll shut about it now. But I'm unhappy! ____________________________ Overall I enjoyed this collection but I'm pretty sure this is the most overtly sexist and misogynistic of the entire collection. I've mentioned before that I'm mindful of the era that they were written but in the earlier collections the lack of women playing a major roll in any of the cases was obviously for the best because when they did it was not for better. These are some of the cases that I knew and loved the most but it was difficult for me to get over how women were viewed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This is the shortest Holmes story collection: only eight stories and a preface written by Watson, explaining that Holmes is now retired to Sussex and keeping bees, and here are some stories he hasn't yet published about their adventures, including their very last one. (All the stories in the last published book, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes, apparently take place before "His Last Bow" as well.) Because of the shortness, you feel it a little bit more when a story is a dud. In particular, I tho This is the shortest Holmes story collection: only eight stories and a preface written by Watson, explaining that Holmes is now retired to Sussex and keeping bees, and here are some stories he hasn't yet published about their adventures, including their very last one. (All the stories in the last published book, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes, apparently take place before "His Last Bow" as well.) Because of the shortness, you feel it a little bit more when a story is a dud. In particular, I thought the first, double-length story, "The Adventure on Wisteria Lane," was a bit dull. Though, to be fair, my mind wandered quite a bit and I didn't pay it the strictest attention. I claim this is because it was dull, but I suppooooose it might have been more interesting with more attention paid. I very much enjoyed most of this book. "The Adventure of the Dying Detective" and "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot" were highlights for me. "Dying Detective" has Holmes up to shenanigans (this time faking his own impending demise, tricking Watson in the process) and "Devil's Foot" has an intriguing premise which it doesn't waste. Mostly I just sort of can't believe I'm almost done with the entire Holmes canon. [3.5 stars, rounded up]

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yibbie

    These stories are among some of the best short detective stories ever written. I find myself going back to them again and again. There is plenty of mystery, but the focus is always on the solution or rather the solving of tragedies and crimes not the gory details of the crimes themselves. There are several curse words. The "worst" one is in the last story An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tobin Elliott

    As per usual, I enjoyed the hell out of this slim volume. For the most part, even though there are times where you can almost feel Arthur Conan Doyle really reaching for a new, unique challenge for Holmes and Watson, he still manages to pull off entertaining stories every time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Namratha

    I have a newly acquired quirk. As I browse through the detective shelf at my local bookstore and come across the neatly lined up spines of SHERLOCK HOLMES' many many adventures, I must, I absolutely must pluck them out just to view the artwork on the cover. Blame it on Benedict. Benedict Cumberbatch. Yes, do. And so, when I came across a bright orange spine of His Last Bow , I pulled it out and lo!....there were my two favourite BBC men, Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, giving me their co I have a newly acquired quirk. As I browse through the detective shelf at my local bookstore and come across the neatly lined up spines of SHERLOCK HOLMES' many many adventures, I must, I absolutely must pluck them out just to view the artwork on the cover. Blame it on Benedict. Benedict Cumberbatch. Yes, do. And so, when I came across a bright orange spine of His Last Bow , I pulled it out and lo!....there were my two favourite BBC men, Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, giving me their combination sultry "put-your-eyes-back-in-your-head-, you-silly-girl" stares. What a fabulous marketing move. So obviously, my first reaction is this: followed by an immediate purchase. I bought Benny home. Yes, I am a member of the dubiously titled "Cumber Collective". Accept it. I have. But I digress. (damn you, Cumberbatch and your cliff-hanger cheekbones) A little bit about the book : HIS LAST BOW is a series of seven previously published Sherlock Holmes stories commencing with the adventure of Wistaria Lodge and concluding with the startlingly stylish "His Last Bow". Along the way, Sherlock and his trusty companion Dr. Watson will deal with a yellow-devil, ponder over the unsavoury gift of a pair of cut-off ears, track down a perpetrator of fifty murders, outwit an obnoxious toad at his own poisonous game, save a beautiful single lady from an assuredly sticky end, be temporarily befuddled by the Devil's deeds and ultimately return from a self-appointed exile to do the country a sizeable favour. And now, back to my gushings. It is singularly impossible for me to separate Arthur Conan Doyle's hero from Benedict Cumberbatch. I have loved the detective at 221B Baker Street as a child, much before BBC decide to do the world a favour and fling a beautifully gaunt man with impeccable cheekbones and high-functioning sociopath written all over his wiry frame into our midst. But today, I reread it with Benedict's Sherlock and Freeman's Watson strongly and indelibly imprinted in my mind. And it just makes the book so much better. Doyle's mysteries are works of art. And he keeps up the slick penmanship in this set of stories. The language is crisp and loaded with wry British asides. The descriptions of the characters, their fallacies, Sherlock's deductions, Watson's frustrations, Lestrade's impotent dependency and wheeeeee, it's Mark Gatiss!!!, sorry Mycroft making an appearance are all satisfyingly covered. The pace never wavers and while the old-fashioned adventures may seem a tad staid for the modern readers, the charm is firmly in place. My favourite story is most definitely "The Last Bow". A supposedly retired Sherlock who has taken up beekeeping in the Sussex Downs has been recalled by the powers that be. Rather than a murder mystery, it's a spy story. Set at the start of the First World War, it encapsulates Sherlock's attention to detail, his skill as a master of disguises and his reunion with his loyal mate, Watson. And the crowning bit is that uncharacteristically poetic and patriotic passage voiced by our prosaic Sherlock With flair and style, our beloved detective takes his legendary Last Bow.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    I'm actually listening to this concurrently with reading the second annotated Sherlock Holmes book. I enjoy reading the stories and copious notes. However, having stumbled upon Derek Jacobi's readings at my library, I simply can't resist listening to the stories first. Jacobi's narration is simply top-notch, with a fascinating interpretation of Holmes that I've never come across before. Holmes has a light touch, almost like Bertie Wooster (almost, but not as nonsensical). I really am enjoying he I'm actually listening to this concurrently with reading the second annotated Sherlock Holmes book. I enjoy reading the stories and copious notes. However, having stumbled upon Derek Jacobi's readings at my library, I simply can't resist listening to the stories first. Jacobi's narration is simply top-notch, with a fascinating interpretation of Holmes that I've never come across before. Holmes has a light touch, almost like Bertie Wooster (almost, but not as nonsensical). I really am enjoying hearing Holmes lightly chide Watson in a laughing manner rather than the usual heavy, frowning way I think of it. This is out of order for going with my annotated book, however, it's the one the library had on hand. I regret nothing! Nothing!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa J.

    I don't know if you think so, but, for me, this one was the best in the series, and I'm talking about the collection of short-stories, not the novels. It was also the darkest one. I find it impossible to tell you which one of the stories I loved the most. The Adventure of The Dying Detective kept me in suspense until the end, which was unexpected. And His Last Bow was also amazing. A great "end" to the canon.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Darinda

    A great collection of Sherlock Holmes mysteries. This book contains eight entertaining short stories. 1. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge 2. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box 3. The Adventure of the Red Circle 4. The Adventure of Bruce-Partington Plans 5. The Adventure of the Dying Detective 6. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax 7. The Adventure of the Devil's Foot 8. His Last Bow

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    Again this was a mixed bag but probably some of the most memorable stories for me!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melany

    My thoughts on each of the Case (view spoiler)[ The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge I like that Sherlock found a rival in Inspector Baynes, that they thought the same way and that the Inspector was just as observant as Sherlock. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box What a stupid jealous ass. First kills his wife and then sents her ear to her sister what a horrible man!!! The Adventure of the Red Circle It was interesting that this story involved the early version of the Italian Mafia, but it sucks that th My thoughts on each of the Case (view spoiler)[ The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge I like that Sherlock found a rival in Inspector Baynes, that they thought the same way and that the Inspector was just as observant as Sherlock. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box What a stupid jealous ass. First kills his wife and then sents her ear to her sister what a horrible man!!! The Adventure of the Red Circle It was interesting that this story involved the early version of the Italian Mafia, but it sucks that this poor couple had to run because this jerk decided that he was in love with Mrs. Lucca. The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans It was interesting having Mycroft and it was interesting having the country at risk because secret plans for a submarine went missing but the murder itself was boring and felt rushed. The Adventure of the Dying Detective I felt bad for Watson, he was made to think that Sherlock was sick and dying for that he could catch a guy that killed his nephew. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax This poor woman was kidnapped and nearly buried alive just so they could steal her jewelry. The idea of the double coffin was clever! The Adventure of the Devil's Foot I felt so bad for Dr. Sterndale, coming all the way bad to England to finally be with the only women he's ever loved only to find out that her brother had murdered for inheritance! I'm happy that Sherlock let him go! His Last Bow. An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes This one was odd, mostly being told from the point of view of a German spy. It was interesting but it was strange that it implied that Sherlock and Watson haven't seen each other in a while and may never see each other again. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kataklicik

    Read via a mix of print and audiobook (YouTube, read by David Clarke).

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