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No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics

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Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all. No Straight Lines sho Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all. No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel (whose book Fun Home was named Time Magazine's 2006 Book of the Year), Howard Cruse (whose groundbreaking Stuck Rubber Baby is now back in print), and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe's most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, cross-over creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves wider attention. Until recently, queer cartooning existed in a parallel universe to the rest of comics, appearing only in gay newspapers and gay bookstores and not in comic book stores, mainstream bookstores or newspapers. The insular nature of the world of queer cartooning, however, created a fascinating artistic scene. LGBT comics have been an uncensored, internal conversation within the queer community, and thus provide a unique window into the hopes, fears, and fantasies of queer people for the last four decades. These comics have forged their aesthetics from the influences of underground comix, gay erotic art, punk zines, and the biting commentaries of drag queens, bull dykes, and other marginalized queers. They have analyzed their own communities, and their relationship with the broader society. They are smart, funny, and profound. No Straight Lines will be heralded by people interested in comics history, and people invested in LGBT culture will embrace it as a unique and invaluable collection.


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Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all. No Straight Lines sho Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all. No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel (whose book Fun Home was named Time Magazine's 2006 Book of the Year), Howard Cruse (whose groundbreaking Stuck Rubber Baby is now back in print), and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe's most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, cross-over creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves wider attention. Until recently, queer cartooning existed in a parallel universe to the rest of comics, appearing only in gay newspapers and gay bookstores and not in comic book stores, mainstream bookstores or newspapers. The insular nature of the world of queer cartooning, however, created a fascinating artistic scene. LGBT comics have been an uncensored, internal conversation within the queer community, and thus provide a unique window into the hopes, fears, and fantasies of queer people for the last four decades. These comics have forged their aesthetics from the influences of underground comix, gay erotic art, punk zines, and the biting commentaries of drag queens, bull dykes, and other marginalized queers. They have analyzed their own communities, and their relationship with the broader society. They are smart, funny, and profound. No Straight Lines will be heralded by people interested in comics history, and people invested in LGBT culture will embrace it as a unique and invaluable collection.

30 review for No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 3* of five The Publisher Says: No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse, and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe's most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, crossover creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves w Rating: 3* of five The Publisher Says: No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse, and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe's most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, crossover creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves wider attention. Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all. Until recently, queer cartooning existed in a parallel universe to the rest of comics, appearing only in gay newspapers and gay bookstores and not in comic book stores, mainstream bookstores or newspapers. The insular nature of the world of queer cartooning, however, created a fascinating artistic scene. LGBT comics have been an uncensored, internal conversation within the queer community, and thus provide a unique window into the hopes, fears, and fantasies of queer people for the last four decades. These comics have forged their aesthetics from the influences of underground comix, gay erotic art, punk zines, and the biting commentaries of drag queens, bull dykes, and other marginalized queers. They have analyzed their own communities, and their relationship with the broader society. They are smart, funny, and profound. No Straight Lines has been heralded by people interested in comics history, and people invested in LGBT culture will embrace it as a unique and invaluable collection. My Review: I don't like comics, comix, graphic novels, or whatever the hell you call them. It's too much work for too little story to my text-adapted eyes. But, in a quest not to ossify into one of Those People, I continue to expose myself to stuff I hate to see if I hate it, or merely don't understand it. Nope. Hate it. At least there were no superheroes. Those just grate on my last nerve with a fine-toothed wood rasp. So why three stars in the ratings, since I hate the damn stuff? Because this is My People talking! I would give an identical collection featuring straight people doing straight people stuff *pause for bad memories to pass* negative stars. As an aside to the squeamishly homophobic (read: normal heterosexual male), the amount of gay-male sex in here will make you *intensely* uncomfortable, but there's a goodly dose of lesbian sex to make it better. As this is a history of LGBTQ subjects treated graphically, it is very very interesting when considered in that light, and shows the increasing sophistication of the audience as material becomes available in greater quantity. The subject matter is, well, pretty much what you'd expect it to be, and pretty much what all fiction is about: Ourselves. At $35, it's a big investment that I don't see making if you're not GLBTQ or very interested in the history of social-issue artistry. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    In 1989 Robert Triptow published Gay Comics, a trade paperback with New American Library that featured Triptow along with Tim Barela, Alison Bechdel, Jennifer Camper, Howard Cruse, Gerard Donelan, Kurt Erichsen, Roberta Gregory, Jeffrey Krell, and all the other major LGBT cartoonists from the underground comic book series Gay Comix as well as the gay and lesbian newsweeklies of the day, etc. Gay Comics was an excellent book, one I’d read and reread many times. It also won the Lambda Literary Awa In 1989 Robert Triptow published Gay Comics, a trade paperback with New American Library that featured Triptow along with Tim Barela, Alison Bechdel, Jennifer Camper, Howard Cruse, Gerard Donelan, Kurt Erichsen, Roberta Gregory, Jeffrey Krell, and all the other major LGBT cartoonists from the underground comic book series Gay Comix as well as the gay and lesbian newsweeklies of the day, etc. Gay Comics was an excellent book, one I’d read and reread many times. It also won the Lambda Literary Award for Humor. But let’s face facts, as the book had been published over 20 years ago and was long out of print, and as the queer comics scene had grown and changed by leaps and bounds since, an update was badly needed. Obviously one of our own had to step up to the plate to accomplish this and that someone turned out to be the estimable Justin Hall, a fine cartoonist in his own right as well as a teacher of the art of cartooning at the California College of the Arts. Hall grew concerned that much of this older work especially was in danger of being lost to the ravages of time unless it were archived; he also wanted to highlight the panoply of truly world-class queer cartoonists who’ve been in our midst all along, many of whom to this day do not get the recognition they deserve. In his introduction he states his 3 main criteria for selecting work, in descending order of importance: artistic merit, historical import, and representational. Naturally for a fanboy like me, much of this work is quite familiar and a joy to see again, including some of my all-time favorites: Burton Clarke’s “Cy Ross and the Snow Queen Syndrome,” Sina’s lovely, whimsical tone poem “Cigarettes,” Robert Triptow’s classic “I Know You Are But What Am I” (now in color!), Howard Cruse’s brilliant “Billy Goes Out” (one of his real career highlights), a selection of Jerry Mills’s “Poppers” strips (when is someone going to finally release a collection of this great cartoonist’s work?), and the hilarious “My Darling Deadly Dyke” by Lee Marrs. There is also great work here that I’d never seen before (Joyce Farmer’s “Slice of Life”) and some tremendously talented creators I’d never even heard of (namely, Nazario and Fabrice Neaud). So happily I still have other worlds to explore in this not-as-small-as-I- thought niche of the larger alt-comics niche. Anyone who edited this book would have switched some things around, picked different stories by some of the artists here, or tossed some artists in favor of others. That much is a given; I certainly would have done some things differently. But Hall did an overall superlative job with a mammoth, very difficult task. And to my mind he could not have chosen better, non-Fun Home or “Dykes to Watch Out For” short pieces by Alison Bechdel than “My Own Private Michigan Hell” and her pointed, too-true “Oppressed Minority Cartoonist,” nor funnier, loopier stories to represent Ed Luce’s Wuvable Oaf and co. than “Worst Dates” or "Straight Street" starring Oaf's buddy, Smusherrr. Other cartoonists I felt were perfectly represented in No Straight Lines include Craig Bostick, Michael Fahy, Edie Fake, Andy Hartzell, David Kelly, Kris Dresen, Erika Moen (her “So Much Pussy” is one of the true laugh out loud moments of the book), Roxxie, and Joey Alison Sayers. And these are just the ones off the top of my head. Let’s hope this collection isn’t simply an endpoint but more a harbinger of more such books to come and for more work and better visibility for non-straight type alt-comics creators. Only time will tell. Some readers and publishers still feel that gay subject matter is not something that non-gays can be interested in or relate to, to which I say nonsense: good storytelling is universal. This book gets the full five stars from me, no question.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    This is an excellent collection of LGBTQ comics from over the last forty years. It includes a range of comic strips from artists including Jon Macy, Eric Orner, Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse and Steve MacIsaac. I am a great fan of both graphic novels and gay fiction and for me it is excellent when the two combine and are presented in one book. This fabulous set of cartoon strips is not just about romance, all kinds of relationships and life situations are found here. It is a volume that shows hum This is an excellent collection of LGBTQ comics from over the last forty years. It includes a range of comic strips from artists including Jon Macy, Eric Orner, Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse and Steve MacIsaac. I am a great fan of both graphic novels and gay fiction and for me it is excellent when the two combine and are presented in one book. This fabulous set of cartoon strips is not just about romance, all kinds of relationships and life situations are found here. It is a volume that shows humour, love, politics, sexuality and different dimensions of life from a LGBTQ perspective. In this way it opens a door to LGBTQ history and to issues and thinking that many of us 'straight' people may not have glimpsed. A brilliant volume of excellent graphics. I hope the popularity of Queer comics and Queer story lines within more popular comics will continue to grow.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    I'm totally thrilled by the number of pieces in here I hadn't read. My lovely friend, Sara, got this for me for a holiday a while ago, and when I finally got to read it, I loved that so many of the pieces are hard to find elsewhere. Not because I think they should be hard to find, but because they are not hard to find because they are here, in this widely available anthology. Killer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    MariNaomi

    This book is so beautiful and carefully curated. I was thrilled to finally read some old gems I'd heard about for years, be introduced to some comics artists I'd never heard of, and revisit some I'm already familiar with. Justin Hall did an impeccable job with this one!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I found few of these comics well drawn or that great, but I did like the way it is set as a look into how artists viewed gay rights, the AIDS crisis and treatment of gays, into the changing current of equal rights. As a historical look it works. Some were touching and stirred emotions. You just have to know not every comic, in fact few, are really good.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    A lot of fantastic comics in here. Just a bit hit or miss and random and the sections didn't necessarily make sense. Particularly the "trans creators, webcomics and stepping out of the ghetto" section. Huh? (there's very little here in the way of trans content). I was between a 3 and a 4. Love that Hothead Paisan is in here, and Jennifer Camper. Mary Wings. Eric Orner. Burton Clarke. Allison Bechdel. Robert triptow. Interesting to have such a mix of style and content--one panel comcs, one-page com A lot of fantastic comics in here. Just a bit hit or miss and random and the sections didn't necessarily make sense. Particularly the "trans creators, webcomics and stepping out of the ghetto" section. Huh? (there's very little here in the way of trans content). I was between a 3 and a 4. Love that Hothead Paisan is in here, and Jennifer Camper. Mary Wings. Eric Orner. Burton Clarke. Allison Bechdel. Robert triptow. Interesting to have such a mix of style and content--one panel comcs, one-page comics, multi-page stories, a lot of memoir-type work and more fictional or fictionalized narratives. the lack of thematic and stylistic cohesiveness is at times fun and at times distracting. Wondrful to discover and rediscover a world of wonderful artists. A lot of really touching and funny moments. Glad I came across this one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erik Barkman

    Brilliant! Wonderful!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I was at the library picking up Water For Elephants and saw this on the shelf and picked it up because of the cover/title/subject matter. I had zero expectations or understanding of what the book would be. I hoped the book would be a lot funnier/clever but it did not live up to what I built it up to be in my mind. The cover shows a bunch of stereotypical gay characters, bright colors, all of the people smiling, etc. so I thought it was going to be funny comics. This wasn't really the case for a l I was at the library picking up Water For Elephants and saw this on the shelf and picked it up because of the cover/title/subject matter. I had zero expectations or understanding of what the book would be. I hoped the book would be a lot funnier/clever but it did not live up to what I built it up to be in my mind. The cover shows a bunch of stereotypical gay characters, bright colors, all of the people smiling, etc. so I thought it was going to be funny comics. This wasn't really the case for a lot of the entries. A lot of this book draws from comics from the 70s and 80s when being gay was not socially acceptable. Several comics seem like they were the artist's struggle and search to come to terms with sexuality, identity, etc. There are two main reasons I gave this only 2 stars. 1) The book wasn't as funny/interesting as I thought it would be. The cover art is amazing - the colors, the drawing, the teaser to get you to pick up the book. (I'd give the cover 5 stars). But inside a lot of the comics were sad, confused, etc. I don't have a problem with an artist using this medium to try to come to terms with identity and sexuality, I was just hoping for/expecting something more comical. 2) A lot of the comics didn't make sense. There were several entries that just had no point or plot. They weren't sad or depressing or unfunny - they just made no sense to me. By the end of the book I was glad to be done. Glad I read it, but glad there wasn't any more to it. I do think this is an ambitious project and I think for a different person this would be a great resource. If you're a person struggling with sexuality/identity/gender/social acceptance, etc. this book is a great resource. There are comics about gay men, lesbians, transgendered people, straight people and more. I also like the title: "No Straight Lines" refers to the blurry/hazy world of sexuality. The editor argues that there are no straight lines - it isn't just gay or straight. There are so many subtleties and nuances to sexuality and gender identity that it's impossible to label yourself or be rigidly defined by straight lines. The idea behind the book, the diversity of comics offered, and the resource it can be are all excellent. But for me the substance of the book and the execution of that idea missed the mark.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I can't really bring myself to rate this. There were a lot of comics I didn't care for and some interesting editorial choices, but No Straight Lines makes a good round-up of queer comics history. I wish there was some wider variation among identities presented, but I'm not sure if that's the editor's fault or The Industry's. A number stories here I was surprisingly already familiar with, but there were plenty of surprises. I think what makes it worth it is the comics picked out from around The P I can't really bring myself to rate this. There were a lot of comics I didn't care for and some interesting editorial choices, but No Straight Lines makes a good round-up of queer comics history. I wish there was some wider variation among identities presented, but I'm not sure if that's the editor's fault or The Industry's. A number stories here I was surprisingly already familiar with, but there were plenty of surprises. I think what makes it worth it is the comics picked out from around The Plague, that made me at least, feel like I was reading something beyond myself.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Oscar E

    Absolutely enjoyable and sometimes heart breaking. The good thing with anthologies is that they bring together a varied selection of what has been produced. The bad thing with anthologies is that they only bring a sample, and they always leave you wanting for more. At least Justin Hall wrote a sustancial introduction with lots of tips for further reading.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a really great collection, probably the best collection of queer comics I have ever seen. Comprehensive and inclusive to the L, G, B, and the T. My longer review is available at bisexual-books.tumblr.com.

  13. 4 out of 5

    VeganMedusa

    Interesting, but would mean more to someone who'd lived through the times and/or experiences. Some of the strips seemed plucked at random out of a story and didn't make any sense to me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz De Coster

    Interesting, though hit-or-miss, as with most anthologies.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    So many cartoon dicks. But for reals, this is some grade A queer history right here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Cannon

    My local library has a surprisingly marginalized community-centric comic book section, and NO STRAIGHT LINES seemed like a good place to start. The editor, Justin Hill, provides an excellent introduction for his book, and he outlines the goals and limits of the anthology with apologies that he couldn't include more. There are then little essays giving broadstroke overviews of each era of queer comics, providing context and highlighting influential artists and writers. Hill's writing is informati My local library has a surprisingly marginalized community-centric comic book section, and NO STRAIGHT LINES seemed like a good place to start. The editor, Justin Hill, provides an excellent introduction for his book, and he outlines the goals and limits of the anthology with apologies that he couldn't include more. There are then little essays giving broadstroke overviews of each era of queer comics, providing context and highlighting influential artists and writers. Hill's writing is informative, celebratory, and accessible. I felt satisfied immediately. Then, I got to main point of the book: the comics. While the front matter had buzzed my little brain cells, the actual comics went right for the heart. The book itself is a hefty one, but it got heavier and heavier as I read. As an art medium, comics bring an immediacy like no other medium does. The characters on the page weren't existing decades ago: they were struggling right before my eyes. I could feel the pulsing weight of their happiness, anxieties, hardships, and triumphs. As a bisexual woman, I emotionally realized the history I was inheriting. It is full of enduring pain and joys snatched right out of the jaws of indifference and homophobic cruelty. Many, many comics centered on the AIDS crisis, and, at some points, I had to put the book down for a breather. If I had any quibbles, it would be the heavy focus on lesbian and gay comics. Bisexuality is mentioned briefly, and more often than not in a disparaging way. Lots of "lesbian who sleeps with one man" instead of "bisexual with a preference for women." Asexuality is seen exactly once, but not explained by name: the character shouts "I'm nothing!" and is saved from this oh-so-awful fate via genie-granted wish. Intersex people are not mentioned by name, only hinted at via characters who present as genderqueer. In addition, I was expecting more transgender comics. Hill explains in his intro that the transgender comic scene didn't gain popularity until recently, but there were still more L & G comics in the modern comic section. I suppose I'll just Google that all myself. In his beginning, Hill encourages readers treat the book like a collection of signposts, to use these brief excerpts to find your future favorite comic. Sound advice, though I gave up on the project when I realized I wanted to read all of them. The limits of representation don't keep NO STRAIGHT LINES from being a deeply moving homage to subversive art, and I recommend it to any person who wants to learn more about the queer comic scene and ear-to-the-ground queer history. Despite not being pictured as I would like to be, this book changed me and I love it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emilia P

    Yo dawgs, people have been making queer comics for a long time. More so even than seeing styles and stuff change, it's really really interesting (and telling? and ....thought-provoking?) to see how the tones and themes change from decade to decade. From Mary and fairy jokes and butch queens in the 70s to all trans issues all the time in recent years, queer history moves at....sort of light speed? With introductory essays to each decade, this was pretty well curated, although content veered from Yo dawgs, people have been making queer comics for a long time. More so even than seeing styles and stuff change, it's really really interesting (and telling? and ....thought-provoking?) to see how the tones and themes change from decade to decade. From Mary and fairy jokes and butch queens in the 70s to all trans issues all the time in recent years, queer history moves at....sort of light speed? With introductory essays to each decade, this was pretty well curated, although content veered from thick to thin quickly. And ...I may be misremembering but there probably could have been more wimmen's stuff. There could always be more. RIGHT.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Wells

    This anthology is a fascinating insight into queer culture, romance and politics. Many of the comics are hilarious but plenty are also moving, either because they deal with emotionally difficult subjects or because they are unashamedly celebratory. Although an effort was made to include stories by and about people of all genders, my only criticisms are that it felt as if there were more comics centred around cis gay men and that the section on trans comics actually had very few examples of trans This anthology is a fascinating insight into queer culture, romance and politics. Many of the comics are hilarious but plenty are also moving, either because they deal with emotionally difficult subjects or because they are unashamedly celebratory. Although an effort was made to include stories by and about people of all genders, my only criticisms are that it felt as if there were more comics centred around cis gay men and that the section on trans comics actually had very few examples of trans experience. Saying that I would still highly recommend this to anyone interested in LGBTQ+ history and/or comics history - the book is so large there is much to be discovered.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    "I set out to make No Straight Lines the definitive anthology of queer comics. In the most profound sense, I failed." This is the opening statement made by the editor in the introduction. I appreciated his honesty especially while holding a heavy anthology! Like all anthologies, I find it difficult to enjoy every strip printed as everyone's taste and styles differ, but on the other hand there are ALWAYS amazing stories I discover usually created by artists/authors I've never heard of before. This "I set out to make No Straight Lines the definitive anthology of queer comics. In the most profound sense, I failed." This is the opening statement made by the editor in the introduction. I appreciated his honesty especially while holding a heavy anthology! Like all anthologies, I find it difficult to enjoy every strip printed as everyone's taste and styles differ, but on the other hand there are ALWAYS amazing stories I discover usually created by artists/authors I've never heard of before. This book definitely earns its 5 stars for it's size, variety, and the amount of dedication obviously put forth by the editor.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    My Recommendation: MUST READ! This is one of those books that could be great for a wide variety of individuals, LGBT/Queer people, comics lovers, social movement historians, anthropologists, etc. It just keeps going there are so many things in hear that made me laugh, quite a few that made me sad, and even a few that gave hope. But be warned it will open up a new world of LGBT/Queer authors and stories that can suck you in. I'm already planning to grab a copy of Bechdel's The Essential Dykes to My Recommendation: MUST READ! This is one of those books that could be great for a wide variety of individuals, LGBT/Queer people, comics lovers, social movement historians, anthropologists, etc. It just keeps going there are so many things in hear that made me laugh, quite a few that made me sad, and even a few that gave hope. But be warned it will open up a new world of LGBT/Queer authors and stories that can suck you in. I'm already planning to grab a copy of Bechdel's The Essential Dykes to Watch Out for one day this week on my lunch break because I've been meaning to read it for years! My Response: I randomly stumbled across the Kickstarter for the documentary version of this book. So of course I had to see if the library had it and it was in the one near me so I walked down and got it at lunch. It was a quick read and covered a wide variety of comics. I mean 40 years in LGBT/Queer history covers so much from AIDS to decriminalization to marriage to adoption rights to the wonderful coming of age of trans* comics. (For more information on the asterisks check out this graphic (It's Pronounced Metrosexual link). The anthology did a great job by dividing the comics into three era's of queer comics:  1) Come Out: Gay Gag Strips, Underground Comix, and Lesbian Literati (1960s-1970s); 2) File Under Queer: Comix to Comics, Punk Zines, and Art During the Plague (1980s-1990s); 3) A New Millennium: Trans Creators, Webcomics, and Stepping Out of the Ghetto (2000s-today?). I listed all of the authors at the end of this post because they all deserve credit in this wonderful anthology. Click here to continue reading on my blog The Oddness of Moving Things.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Thomas

    An anthology of LGBTQ+ graphic and sequential art, starting with underground comix in the 70s, going through zines and ending with the age of webcomics. As a cis hetero white male I can't identify with most of it, but I still appreciate the spirit. It's interesting to see the changes in zeitgeist over time, from the despair of the AIDS epidemic to the emergence of more trans voices in the last 10-15 years. Definitely worth a read and a great jumping off point to read more material from contribut An anthology of LGBTQ+ graphic and sequential art, starting with underground comix in the 70s, going through zines and ending with the age of webcomics. As a cis hetero white male I can't identify with most of it, but I still appreciate the spirit. It's interesting to see the changes in zeitgeist over time, from the despair of the AIDS epidemic to the emergence of more trans voices in the last 10-15 years. Definitely worth a read and a great jumping off point to read more material from contributors.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Reeter

    5 stars simply because I enjoyed this so damn much. I've been craving queer comics ever since I was a kid, and I only wish this book was around when I was questioning my sexuality. Obviously, this book doesn't have every single queer comic out there, but it's done a damn good job, and I especially appreciate that trans comic artists were talked about.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    It was a good historical overview of queer comics. I could have used a bit more explanatory text, as I came to it with neither a good grasp on queer history nor any familiarity with queer comics. It was full of examples of those four decades of comics, but a few of them sailed over my head because I did not recognize their context.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mo Orbach

    Packed with history and humor, this book made me feel connected to my predecessors in a way I didn't know I was missing. It also inspired me to start visual journaling about the oddities of being a queer woman today.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Gorgeous and great for exploring new cartoonists

  26. 4 out of 5

    l.

    tbh I only read the panels by the women artists (it’s due tomorrow and I’m tired). I really want to see more of Jennifer Camper’s work. Also Alison Bechdel is so funny.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Disappointingly few trans comics featured, personally.

  28. 5 out of 5

    N

    A wonderful, broad look at queer comics and queer history. The collection is varied over many identities and provides such a variety of perspectives.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yani

    As Hall himself points out in his introduction, this isn't a definitive catalogue of all queer comics for the last forty years, but it is an interesting snapshot in the development of queer themed comics. My main complaint here is about the layout of the book. It's divided into three sections, each dealing with a different time period, and each of these has a written explanation of the era... but these explanations are all clumped together at the beginning of the book, rather than being at the be As Hall himself points out in his introduction, this isn't a definitive catalogue of all queer comics for the last forty years, but it is an interesting snapshot in the development of queer themed comics. My main complaint here is about the layout of the book. It's divided into three sections, each dealing with a different time period, and each of these has a written explanation of the era... but these explanations are all clumped together at the beginning of the book, rather than being at the beginning of the section (I also think there's a couple of comics that are mentioned in the first section but placed in the second, which is weird).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ariel Caldwell

    Four decades of queer comics piled into one tome is one heavy read! I am glad this book exists, and chronicles the history of the queer comics movement, but it was too much for me to read at this point.

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