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リーグ・オブ・エクストラオーディナリー・ジェントルメン 1 [Rīgu Obu Ekusutoraōdinarī Jentorumen]

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映画化でも話題になったアラン・ムーア渾身の一作。架空の19世紀を舞台に、アラン・クォーターメイン(ソロモン王の洞窟)、ネモ船長(海底二万里)、ジキル/ハイド(ジキル博士とハイド氏)ら、名作小説の主人公達が大活躍!


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映画化でも話題になったアラン・ムーア渾身の一作。架空の19世紀を舞台に、アラン・クォーターメイン(ソロモン王の洞窟)、ネモ船長(海底二万里)、ジキル/ハイド(ジキル博士とハイド氏)ら、名作小説の主人公達が大活躍!

30 review for リーグ・オブ・エクストラオーディナリー・ジェントルメン 1 [Rīgu Obu Ekusutoraōdinarī Jentorumen]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    It's easy to see The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1 as a fluffy action confection. It doesn't smack you in the head with a puddle of blood and a happy face pin like Watchmen. Nor does it open with a girl about to be raped in a post-apocalyptic Neo-Fascist London like V for Vendetta. It doesn't open with extreme gravitas. Instead, we get a fun variation of the classic spy mission opener: Mina Murray (nee Harker, nee Murray) is ordered on a mission by Campion Bond (grandfather of 007) to It's easy to see The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1 as a fluffy action confection. It doesn't smack you in the head with a puddle of blood and a happy face pin like Watchmen. Nor does it open with a girl about to be raped in a post-apocalyptic Neo-Fascist London like V for Vendetta. It doesn't open with extreme gravitas. Instead, we get a fun variation of the classic spy mission opener: Mina Murray (nee Harker, nee Murray) is ordered on a mission by Campion Bond (grandfather of 007) to collect members for MI5's "Menagerie." From this moment to the last, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1 is a cracking tale of intrigue and action, full of famous literary characters who most readers are familiar with and probably even love. It looks, feels and reads like a summer blockbuster (too bad it was such a flop on-screen). But this is Alan Moore, and he always has a purpose beyond entertainment. There's much going on in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1. Too much to talk about here. But one of Moore's most important purposes is his need to challenge our conception of heroes and heroism. It's a theme he tackles in all of his best works, but it takes on a special significance in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1 because this time he is working with established "heroes." Moore makes each and every one of his characters unsavoury -- even nasty -- then allows us love them despite ourselves. Captain Nemo is a pirate, Allan Quartermain is an opium addict, Jekyll-Hyde may very well have been Jack the Ripper, the Invisible Man is a multiple rapist, and Mina Murray is a disgraced woman (at least according to the conventions of her time) who doesn't seem to like men much anymore. None of these heroes seem as ugly as Rorschach or Comedian, nor are any as ruthless as V, so we enjoy their adventure, cheer them on as they cross swords with the first M (who turns out to be the granddaddy of villainous geniuses), and overlook behaviours that are little better than the nastiest behaviour of some of Moore's more easy to disdain protagonists. What Moore wants us to consider is in the contrast between his characters and the established characters. He wants to challenge our affinity for these heroes. He wants us to ask questions about them and ourselves: why do we overlook the behaviour of the League? Why are we on their side? Why do we support -- and why do they support -- a nostalgic view of Blighty's colonialism? Why do we give these heroes a pass? His answer is that we do it because they are familiar. We know them. We know of their exploits, either through first hand experience or through hearsay, and we are ready to embrace their "greatness" before we even start reading about them in the League. We're steeped in their mythologies from the original books to film adaptations to stage plays to comic strips to animation, and having already accepted them as "heroes" we accept them as versions of us. They are us, and we can't see ourselves as anything other than likable, so we cut the "Menagerie" considerably more slack than we'd cut for Moore's other heroes -- and Moore wants us to see that our willing delusion when it comes to these characters is wrong. All the way through this story I couldn't help thinking about The Three Musketeers. It's one of my favourite novels, though I haven't read it for a while, and I don't know anyone who doesn't love d'Artagnan. Hell, I love d'Artagnan. What's not to love? Right? Well, plenty if one takes the time to really consider his behaviour. He's a murderer, a rapist, and a purveyor of myriad nasty little vices. Yet we all (or most us) love him. Moore wants us to think about that for a while. He wants us to think about why we love the characters we love, then apply that knowledge to the way we see ourselves and the world around us. I believe he wants The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol.1 to provide as much meaning for audiences as his recognized masterpieces, Watchmen and V for Vendetta. I think he succeeds, even though its manifestation is so subtle it can be easily missed. The fault, dear Reader, is not in Moore's writing, But in our reading. That is why we are underlings.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Great good fun! Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill collaborate on a TASTY! tale where characters from literature and pulp fiction inhabit an alternate Victorian England and band together to save the empire and have a rousing fine rime of it. Readers will enjoy Moore’s penchant for adding detail to his DELICIOUS! mix of HAVEATYOU! with inclusions of characters from Dracula, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Allan Quartermain Mythos and the Invisible Man. And of course there is Jules Verne’s Great good fun! Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill collaborate on a TASTY! tale where characters from literature and pulp fiction inhabit an alternate Victorian England and band together to save the empire and have a rousing fine rime of it. Readers will enjoy Moore’s penchant for adding detail to his DELICIOUS! mix of HAVEATYOU! with inclusions of characters from Dracula, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Allan Quartermain Mythos and the Invisible Man. And of course there is Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo. An erudite reader will also pick out scores of references to other characters and even a brief inclusion of a very special Dickens’ character. The “Where’s Waldo” quality of finding references to classic books is half the fun. Besides the CORNUCOPIA! of allusions and references, Moore spins a novel and spirited tale to boot and adds greater depth to the characters than may be otherwise be imagined. This is an intelligent, smart and entertaining joy ride and O’Neill’s illustrations are spot on. Bravo! And I’ll be reading more.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    This was much better than I thought it would be. Well done Alan Moore! The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen takes place during the Victorian Era in London and it is a steampunk version of the British Empire. A mysterious head of British Intelligence (Mr. M) wants to put together a League to combat extraordinary threats to the Empire. This first volume has Mina Murray ( from Dracula- Harker's wife) acting as the recruiting agent. The first few stories show how each member was recruited from opium- This was much better than I thought it would be. Well done Alan Moore! The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen takes place during the Victorian Era in London and it is a steampunk version of the British Empire. A mysterious head of British Intelligence (Mr. M) wants to put together a League to combat extraordinary threats to the Empire. This first volume has Mina Murray ( from Dracula- Harker's wife) acting as the recruiting agent. The first few stories show how each member was recruited from opium-addict Alan Quartermain to Dr. Jekyll. I'll let you read the stories for yourself. They are worth it. The League consists of Alan Quartermain, Mina Murray, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Griffin (the Invisible Man) and Captain Nemo. There is an overriding threat to the Empire, London in particular, and the League must fight against the forces of a mysterious Chinese criminal warlord. But the mystery of Mr. M is finally revealed-it is well done indeed. I enjoyed this story. A great adventure in a steampunk version of the British Empire. There are a variety of famous literary characters who make cameo appearances and are pleasure to see them come to life under Alan Moore's skillful storytelling. It's top notch! The art? Kevin O'neill's art isn't truly to my taste (the characters seem to be distorted) but it did grow on me. It excels at depiction of large city or machine scenes but isn't as adept with certain human profiles. But it never hampered the story and wasn't an eyesore. Good story, decent art, great prose and wonderful characters (Captain Nemo, Mr. Griffin and Dr. Jekyll are my favorites) make for a great story. I am a fan and will look for more of this series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jean Grace

    Bah. This was another disappointing read for me. I had high hopes for this series. This book brings together a problem-solving team composed of characters from Victorian lit: Mina Murray (whose brief marriage to Jonathan Harker has ended badly), the Invisible Man, Captain Nemo, Allan Quatermain, and Henry Jekyll & Edward Hyde. While Sherlock Holmes is not present in the flesh, he is certainly on everyone's minds. How could such a premise go wrong? Maybe Moore just needs a lot more space and Bah. This was another disappointing read for me. I had high hopes for this series. This book brings together a problem-solving team composed of characters from Victorian lit: Mina Murray (whose brief marriage to Jonathan Harker has ended badly), the Invisible Man, Captain Nemo, Allan Quatermain, and Henry Jekyll & Edward Hyde. While Sherlock Holmes is not present in the flesh, he is certainly on everyone's minds. How could such a premise go wrong? Maybe Moore just needs a lot more space and time in order to make characters work. (There are only two volumes in this series, and they are both slim.) There are a couple of interesting moments in the book. For example, when characters speak Arabic or Chinese, there is no translation of the words, and the balloons go on for several panels. On the other hand, there were long, apparently pointless digressions and disturbingly racist and sexist elements. I'm not sure what to make of those or why Moore feels obliged to reproduce those aspects of Victorian culture--maybe they are meant to make a clever point that I am missing. In the end, I found that I didn't care about any of the characters or what happened to them. This volume also contains a painfully written short story by Moore that functions as a kind of prequel to Quatermain's part of the story. Readers heavily invested in steampunk may find this volume a delightful romp through an alternate Victorian universe. (Note: I have not seen the movie nor do I ever expect to.) (Further note: Sadly, I bought Volume 2 at the same time I bought Volume 1. If I make it through, I will post a review.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Mac

    In a word? Underwhelming. In a sentence? Boring as hell, needlessly bleak, & oversexed to the point of annoyance. The elephant in the room is, of course, the movie adaptation. While I'm not blind to the flaws of the film (namely the varied FX quality & the sprawling plot that bounces from one stage to another), I'm not ashamed to say I prefer the screen version. Indeed, I'll go a step further & admit to a great cinematic crime: I like the movie. It makes me smile. This book, however, In a word? Underwhelming. In a sentence? Boring as hell, needlessly bleak, & oversexed to the point of annoyance. The elephant in the room is, of course, the movie adaptation. While I'm not blind to the flaws of the film (namely the varied FX quality & the sprawling plot that bounces from one stage to another), I'm not ashamed to say I prefer the screen version. Indeed, I'll go a step further & admit to a great cinematic crime: I like the movie. It makes me smile. This book, however, does not. Certainly I'm not opposed to dark stories (as anyone who knows my tastes will confirm), but I dislike bleakness that exists solely for its own sake. In this case, the overhanging gloom & flag-waving gothicness made the story incredibly flat & forced. While there are recognizable elements that carry from paper to film, I have to say the adaptation crew did the best they could given a cast of unlikable talking heads & a nonsensical plotline that is equally nonsensical as the heavily reworked movie version, if not moreso. (Yeah, I said it.) The movie took a lighter Indiana Jones-esque approach, & that fits the original characters much better; the paper version takes itself way too seriously & it shows on every page, whether Griffin's rapey antics at the school or Quartermain's sad-sack slumping for lack of narcotics. I could imagine Sean Connery trotting around the world for Queen & Country -- but this guy? No chance. As for Mina...*sigh* Yet again we have Dracula fanfic wherein Jonathan Harker is reduced to a useless noodle and/or oppressive jerk so as to allow him to be tossed aside before the story opens. REALLY? I agree with another reviewer who asks whether anyone has actually read the original novel. At least the movie had the grace to make Jonathan deceased rather than maligned as a terrible husband for whatever reason. I've read a lot of Victorian lit, including most of the sources these characters are based on (plus many other Victorian penny-dreadful & sensational novels -- I mention this only for trolls who might assume my opinions are based on the movie alone). Despite the failure of this particular book, I'll give a nod to Moore for including so many references to other 19th-c works within this one. That being said, the references were either so hamfisted as to be annoying (example: The Artful Dodger) or so oblique that it felt like an excuse to show how well-read the creators were (example: the Whitby sign). As for the comic itself -- painfully dull dialogue with a plodding succession of panels that went from excruciatingly detailed walks down the street to skipping over action sequences that made little sense to begin with -- I was not impressed. The concept has so much potential. But I think Moore would have been better served to write an actual prose novel & include some illustrations for atmosphere -- something like Brom's Child Thief. This collection has too much wasted space & annoying dialogue bubbles that do nothing to bolster the characters. Never for a moment could I forget this was fiction, & poorly realized fiction at that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Za pocetak dosta bolje od filma. Ako vas je film razocarao strip ce vam vratiti poverenje u ove likove i ovu pricu. Sama prica je dosta jednostavna mada se fino uklapa u format steampunk-a i lici na nesto sto bi mozda i Zil Vern napisao ali glavna prednost su sami heroji koji vode ovu pricu. Mada termin heroja bas i nije adekvatan posto imamo pirata, ubicu, silovatelja, narkomana i raspustenicu (sto za ono vreme nije bas pozitivna osobina :) ). Ali sama prica je dosta mracna i smestena u okruzenj Za pocetak dosta bolje od filma. Ako vas je film razocarao strip ce vam vratiti poverenje u ove likove i ovu pricu. Sama prica je dosta jednostavna mada se fino uklapa u format steampunk-a i lici na nesto sto bi mozda i Zil Vern napisao ali glavna prednost su sami heroji koji vode ovu pricu. Mada termin heroja bas i nije adekvatan posto imamo pirata, ubicu, silovatelja, narkomana i raspustenicu (sto za ono vreme nije bas pozitivna osobina :) ). Ali sama prica je dosta mracna i smestena u okruzenje Londona koje je dosta mracno i odurno tako da do kraja ipak navijamo za nase likove da izadju kao pobednici. Jedna od boljih stvari koje ovde srecemeo je fino uklopljen mix imaginarnih likova iz raznih knjiga i to na nacin koji ihpretstavlja onakvim kakvi su originalno a opet nudi dovoljno razloga da objasni zasto su postali to sto jesu u ovoj prici. Stil crtanja je interesantan, originalan mada ne bas po mom ukusu ali to je vec subjektivno pitanje. Kazimo samo da je atmosfera odlicno pogodjena. U svakom slucaju nastavljam sa citanjem serijala.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Magrat Ajostiernos

    Olvidémonos todos de la película, por favor. Y tengamos en cuenta una cosa: Este es un cómic para amantes de los libros con mente abierta. Esta es una de las pocas grandes obras de Alan Moore que me quedaban por leer, y llevaba años con ganas, al principio tengo que decir que me decepcionó un poco, me parecía la típica historia de aventuras ambientada en la época victoriana... Pero los personajes literarios tan oscuros como geniales, los miles de guiños, los paralelismos con las novelitas baratas Olvidémonos todos de la película, por favor. Y tengamos en cuenta una cosa: Este es un cómic para amantes de los libros con mente abierta. Esta es una de las pocas grandes obras de Alan Moore que me quedaban por leer, y llevaba años con ganas, al principio tengo que decir que me decepcionó un poco, me parecía la típica historia de aventuras ambientada en la época victoriana... Pero los personajes literarios tan oscuros como geniales, los miles de guiños, los paralelismos con las novelitas baratas de la época (penny dreadful)... todo eso acabó enganchándome y me acabé dando cuenta de que aunque la historia en sí no fuera especialmente remarcable, todo resultaba tan original que me encantaba. Altamente disfrutable, quiero más.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Χαρά Ζ.

    I found this utterly entertaining. What i loved most are the dialogues. The way the characters talk to each other is just beautiful. Can't wait to continue with the series <3

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    1.5 to 2.0 stars. I was really disappointed with this graphic novel after going into it was high expectations. Not quite bad enough to rate 1 star as there are some clever scenes and some of the dialogue is engaging. On the whole though, this is an AMAZING CONCEPT that deserved better treatment than it received here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Alan Moore has had terrible luck with the film industry. The only adapatation of his work that he had the presence of mind to disavow before its release was the surprisingly good "V for Vendetta." The others of his works produced for the screen were the tepidly-received "From Hell" and the god-awful "League of Extraordinary Gentleman" adaptation, "LXG." The film was stillborn, creatively, lacking the tongue-in-cheek humor and moral ambiguity that made the books so enjoyable, and was very obviousl Alan Moore has had terrible luck with the film industry. The only adapatation of his work that he had the presence of mind to disavow before its release was the surprisingly good "V for Vendetta." The others of his works produced for the screen were the tepidly-received "From Hell" and the god-awful "League of Extraordinary Gentleman" adaptation, "LXG." The film was stillborn, creatively, lacking the tongue-in-cheek humor and moral ambiguity that made the books so enjoyable, and was very obviously the work of a group of movie executives who were determined to create a hit new action franchise. The problem: how to make a seriously-intended action movie starring Alan Quatermain, a vampire, the Invisible Man, Dr. Jekyll and Captain Nemo? (The answer: you can't.) The comic opens with the retrieval of Alan Quatermain from a Moroccan opium den, by Mina Murray and Captain Nemo. A confrontation with an evil spirit, documented in the appendices to the comics, has left Quatermain a shadow of a man, a bedraggled wretch lying on filthy mattresses, hopelessly addicted to opium. Miss Murray and the captain are on assignment to the British government's secret service, and take their orders from stout gentleman by the name of Bond. One by one, the team is rounded up, some of the members found in places that would not make it to the silver screen. The terrifying Mr. Hyde is the perpetrator of the Murders in the Rue Morgue, a job being investigated by Edgar Allen Poe's Inspector Dauphin. The Invisible Man has been running rampant in a girl's boarding school, some of whose occupants believe they have come to be impregnated by the Holy Spirit. Throughout the series, even minor characters are given a backstory; most of them are borrrowed from turn-of-the-20th century literature. The results are delicious and frequently hilarious. Captain Nemo's first mate is a sailor from the Pequod; one of the schoolgirls attacked by the Invisible Man turns out to be Pollyanna, (who, not surprisingly, is determined to be positive about the whole affair.) Over the two volumes, appearances are also made by Professor Moriarty, Shelock Holmes himself (and his allegedly more brilliant brother, Mycroft,) Mr. Toad from Wind in the Willows(!), Rupert the Bear, Dr. Moreau, the Martians from War of the Worlds, and the alien Sorns from C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet. Topping it all off are the hilarious letters to the editor pages, managed by a draconian Victorian moralist and written in the purplest of prose. (Oh, and the artwork is spectacular.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    earthy

    Great concept, horrible execution. The art is atrociously awful, and sexism and racism abound (perhaps legitimate given the time period, but is it necessary to revel in them with such glee?). As a diehard Sherlockian, I was a bit confused about the timing--this story takes place in 1898, and Sherlock Holmes is believed dead; however, his "hiatus" was actually 1891-1894, so he'd totally be around at this point. As continuity errors go, it's a big one, since the plot and particularly the villain a Great concept, horrible execution. The art is atrociously awful, and sexism and racism abound (perhaps legitimate given the time period, but is it necessary to revel in them with such glee?). As a diehard Sherlockian, I was a bit confused about the timing--this story takes place in 1898, and Sherlock Holmes is believed dead; however, his "hiatus" was actually 1891-1894, so he'd totally be around at this point. As continuity errors go, it's a big one, since the plot and particularly the villain are heavily dependent on Holmes not being around. About the only thing really going for this one is the characterization of Mina Murray (of Dracula fame) as a smart, confident woman with loads of charisma and leadership qualities. It would've been nice to see her compatriots--the Invisible Man, Allan Quartermain, Jekyll/Hyde, and Captain Nemo--actually bother to respect her instead of sniping about uppity women behind her back and miraculously saving her when she's sexually threatened (seriously, Moore, would it kill you to write a story in which a woman ISN'T sexually assaulted?). In conclusion: Possibly worth reading if you're a big Victorian literature fan; otherwise you can skip it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Great concept, terrible execution. Moore manages to reduce about a dozen Victorian adventure classics to fit into his apparently pea-sized brain, and out comes this. This book offended both my conservative and my liberal impulses, with banal pornographic sequences, flat, amoral "heroes" and offensive Asian stereotypes. (Moore has less sympathy for Chinese people than Tolkien has for orcs.) This book certainly isn't suitable for children, and it's too childish for me. So I don't know who the audi Great concept, terrible execution. Moore manages to reduce about a dozen Victorian adventure classics to fit into his apparently pea-sized brain, and out comes this. This book offended both my conservative and my liberal impulses, with banal pornographic sequences, flat, amoral "heroes" and offensive Asian stereotypes. (Moore has less sympathy for Chinese people than Tolkien has for orcs.) This book certainly isn't suitable for children, and it's too childish for me. So I don't know who the audience is.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Not to be confused with the bizarre but hilarious British television show about a dysfunctional rural town, The League of Gentlemen. This graphic novel is daring, imaginative, artistic and engaging, and my favourite part of it would hands-down be its characters. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is unforgettable and practically alive as a work of fiction.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Sorry...not my cup of English Breakfast Tea. I found it rather disappointing. I'd never read any of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen before this, I'd only seen the movie (of course it was a bit disappointing to so...) This, like a lot of books that I've been disappointed in is one I think is a good idea. It just doesn't, "come off". Willamina who is not Mina (am I the only one who actually read that novel????). Allan Quatermain is an opium addict, Captain Nemo is still trucking around under Sorry...not my cup of English Breakfast Tea. I found it rather disappointing. I'd never read any of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen before this, I'd only seen the movie (of course it was a bit disappointing to so...) This, like a lot of books that I've been disappointed in is one I think is a good idea. It just doesn't, "come off". Willamina who is not Mina (am I the only one who actually read that novel????). Allan Quatermain is an opium addict, Captain Nemo is still trucking around under the sea...a bit. Edward Hyde is running amok... you get the idea. (At least I didn't see Tom Sawyer). This just didn't draw me in nor even appeal to me. If you're a League fan, enjoy. Don't plan to follow it up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    I admit I saw the movie first. With that out of the way, I am going to try hard not to compare the two in my review, even though I did when I was reading. I will just add that I have no quarrels with the casting decisions all around (not including the addition of Dorian Gray and Tom Sawyer). I've been wanting to read this for a while because I love mashups, and I have a particular love for Victorian genre fiction and literature. I finally bit the bullet and pulled this off my library shelves. Her I admit I saw the movie first. With that out of the way, I am going to try hard not to compare the two in my review, even though I did when I was reading. I will just add that I have no quarrels with the casting decisions all around (not including the addition of Dorian Gray and Tom Sawyer). I've been wanting to read this for a while because I love mashups, and I have a particular love for Victorian genre fiction and literature. I finally bit the bullet and pulled this off my library shelves. Here are my thoughts: I think this book is too crass for my tastes. The violence, the characterization, and to some degree, the sexuality (although that is probably more subtly done than the other aspects). On the other hand, I did like Quatermain, Harker, and Nemo, and I sort of liked Dr. Jekyll. I loved the idea of a their teaming up for the defense of Great Britain and all that. I despised Hawley Griffin, the Invisible Man. He was repulsive. His behavior showed no moral compass whatsoever, and his willingness to harm innocent people was distressing. His behavior in the girl's school was beyond the pale. I can't hold the actions of Mr. Edward Hyde against his alter ego, Dr. Henry Jekyll, but I wasn't a fan of the carnage that Hyde perpetrates, gleefully illustrated by the artist of this book, Kevin O'Neil. Another big issue was the very racist Orientalism on display in this book. I realize that this is a realistic reflection of the time period, but I can't be too tolerant of how unrestrained it was , especially in a modern publication. The pictures of the Chinese characters seemed too much racist caricatures from some sort of propaganda pamphlet for my comfort. In contrast, Captain Nemo's character is portrayed with dignity and strength of character. It was hard to integrate the two in my thinking. I want to guess that Moore and the artist wanted us to take it tongue in cheek, but it was a bit too offensive for my tastes. I'm not sure how I feel about this book. I guess if I pick this series up again, it might be with long intervals in between. I definitely have to be in the mood for this kind of subject matter, with main leads whose behavior is disturbingly psychopathic and amoral, and the above mentioned racist content. While I can excuse Dr. Jekyll, right now, I pretty much hate Hawley Griffin and consider him a menace to society. I haven't read The Invisible Man, so it's possible he's very much in line with the character from HG Wells' novel, so I guess I'll have to read it and see what I think. I give this three stars because there is something worthwhile about this idea, but I wasn't too thrilled about several aspects of the execution.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    ‘La Liga de los Caballeros Extraordinarios, Volumen 1’ (The League of the Extraordinary Gentleman 1-6, 2000) es una recopilación de las ediciones en grapa que se publicaron a finales de los 90. El guión es del aclamado Alan Moore, y el dibujo de Kevin O’Neill. La historia transcurre en 1898, cuando Mina Murray es contratada por el gobierno británico para reclutar a una serie de peculiares, por llamarles de alguna manera, personajes. Su misión, enfrentarse a una conspiración contra Gran Bretaña. S ‘La Liga de los Caballeros Extraordinarios, Volumen 1’ (The League of the Extraordinary Gentleman 1-6, 2000) es una recopilación de las ediciones en grapa que se publicaron a finales de los 90. El guión es del aclamado Alan Moore, y el dibujo de Kevin O’Neill. La historia transcurre en 1898, cuando Mina Murray es contratada por el gobierno británico para reclutar a una serie de peculiares, por llamarles de alguna manera, personajes. Su misión, enfrentarse a una conspiración contra Gran Bretaña. Se nota que Alan Moore se lo ha pasado estupendamente escribiendo esta historia, todo un homenaje a la literatura de aventuras y ciencia ficción decimonónica. H.G. Wells, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H. Rider Haggard, Bram Stoker, R.L. Stevenson, son los autores cuyos personajes se pasean por las páginas de esta novela gráfica. Resulta fascinante ir siguiendo las referencias incluidas por el autor. Al final del volumen se incluye además un relato lovecraftiano de Alan Moore, ‘Allan y el velo rasgado’, también muy disfrutable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    I was so not impressed by this. It's my first Alan Moore book, and possibly my last because this just really didn't float my boat. We see a lot of racism and sexism straight away, and a lot of brutality. I don't really mind brutality in graphic novels, but this was just silly and I wasn't interested in the story. The art was rubbish-y (although art is fairly personal so some may like it, it's just not my style) and the story was just a lot of nonsense (again, in my opinion). Sadly, not for me. 1 I was so not impressed by this. It's my first Alan Moore book, and possibly my last because this just really didn't float my boat. We see a lot of racism and sexism straight away, and a lot of brutality. I don't really mind brutality in graphic novels, but this was just silly and I wasn't interested in the story. The art was rubbish-y (although art is fairly personal so some may like it, it's just not my style) and the story was just a lot of nonsense (again, in my opinion). Sadly, not for me. 1*

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    4-4.5 stars The adaptation-loved-it shelf may change. Bear in mind, I saw the movie years before I even knew the graphic novel existed (and, thus, years ago). I do still love the idea of some of literature's most beloved characters banding together to create a kickass supergroup. And something else I loved about the book that I think got pushed aside in the film, but Mina being the leader? Hell yeah, girl. Looking forward to volume 2, the Black Dossier, and the rest.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joaquin Garza

    En serio.... ¿Qué les costaba hacer una adaptación fiel?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pinkerton

    Un fumetto vittoriano ma paradossalmente in modo esuberante, che fa proprio di questo il suo punto di forza, reinterpretando - in maniera a dir poco magnifica - alcuni dei più grandi personaggi della letteratura. L’utilizzo da parte di Moore di questa sorta di “Suicide Squad” vintage mi ha lasciato estasiato. Un mistero, anzi più d’uno, da risolvere districandosi fra gli eccessi dell’epoca e le originali quanto letali personalità coinvolte. Ogni singolo personaggio appartenente a questo bizzarro Un fumetto vittoriano ma paradossalmente in modo esuberante, che fa proprio di questo il suo punto di forza, reinterpretando - in maniera a dir poco magnifica - alcuni dei più grandi personaggi della letteratura. L’utilizzo da parte di Moore di questa sorta di “Suicide Squad” vintage mi ha lasciato estasiato. Un mistero, anzi più d’uno, da risolvere districandosi fra gli eccessi dell’epoca e le originali quanto letali personalità coinvolte. Ogni singolo personaggio appartenente a questo bizzarro gruppo di eroi? merita un 10 e lode in pagella. Illustrazioni perfette per l’opera. Non ho dato il voto massimo perché lo scritto “Allan e il velo lacerato” posto in appendice, incentrato sull’esploratore coloniale Allan Quatermain, l’ho trovato senza mezzi termini un polpettone indigesto.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    Alan, you son of a bitch, you've done it again. Recycling literary icons into an old time adventure of steampunk, mystery, villainy, and foreign lands. The writing is styled for 1889, which is cool. The artwork is well done and surprisingly colorful, reminding me of Gibbons in Watchmen. My biggest gripe is how women are portrayed. Nothing new for Moore, however. But let's not gloss over what really matters: the characters. I will admit that I am a shitty reader of classics, even as a former Engli Alan, you son of a bitch, you've done it again. Recycling literary icons into an old time adventure of steampunk, mystery, villainy, and foreign lands. The writing is styled for 1889, which is cool. The artwork is well done and surprisingly colorful, reminding me of Gibbons in Watchmen. My biggest gripe is how women are portrayed. Nothing new for Moore, however. But let's not gloss over what really matters: the characters. I will admit that I am a shitty reader of classics, even as a former English major. I've never read 20,000 Leagues, The Invisible Man, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, or King Solomon's Mines (which, truth be told, I've never heard of). While I have read Poe's "Murders in Rue Morgue" and "The Purloined Letter" (among most of Poe's work), I didn't remember Auguste Dupin. So there's that. But even if you aren't familiar with these characters you won't feel lost. The characters, at least Moore's interpretation of them, are pretty badass. There are a few exceptions because they all can't be badass. Auguste Dupin is forgettable, merely offering quiet detective skills and his French nationality. For one scene he's a decent fighter and gun handler for a short Frenchman. Maybe he offers more in subsequent issues, but he has no "aha" moment in this one. Captain Nemo is a boss. He's mystical, no bullshit, dominating, hates Imperialist England. He pilots an awesome squid-shaped submarine called Nautilus and carries a mini-gun, as in helicopter-mounted MACHINE GUN, in 1889. Yeah. Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde is a fun to watch bumbling scientist turned giant raging murdering primate monster who tears men in half and limb from limb. He's kind of like the pre-Hulk. Or Pringles, he just can't stop. I've never heard of Wilhemina Murray either, but a quick Google search tells me she's a vampire (hence Dracula and the red scarf she wears, and this isn't exactly a spoiler because she's a pre-existing character). She disappointed the hell out of me, however, and I think that's Moore's fault. Due to his history with female characters and playing into 19th century stereotypes, it's suggested that Mina Murray is raped (actually turned into a vampire, but we don't know this contextually), she's almost raped by "beastly" Egyptians, and is constantly threatened/in threat of being raped because of her cowardice/fragility/innate female desire to be dominated (bullshit). And she stutters! Maybe this is a 19th century literary motif, because all of them (minus Nemo the badass) stutter when s-scared. But even as a super strong immortal vampire, Mina didn't really do shit. She brow beat and figured out clues but generally steered clear of any action. Of all characters, why would Moore bench the vampire? The Invisible Man, Hawley Griffin, is a mixed bag. Let's call him trail mix. He's fearless, sneaky, marginal - M&Ms and cashews. But also a serial rapist and murderer - raisins, definitely raisins. Oh, I also forgot Allan Quartermain. What a weird character. An "adventurer" who is like the Cowardly Lion carrying an elephant gun. Some of these male characters are very emasculated and others are raving murderers and rapists. Quite the dichotomy. He likes Mina but doesn't have the balls to tell her. More on that later, I hope. Other characters include a relative of James Bond, Campion Bond, who is very fat for some reason, and later (view spoiler)[after disappearing (hide spoiler)] it's jokingly mentioned his fatter brother has eaten him. Sherlock Holmes makes an appearance. And Holmes' arch nemesis (view spoiler)[James Moriarity (hide spoiler)] serves as a major character and classic evil villain. I think the protagonists hold the story together fairly well considering, but I have my favorites. Surprisingly, I liked Mina, but expected far more from her (and perhaps from Moore). While on the subject of defeminizing, what's up with that whole boarding school scene? (view spoiler)[The girl-on-girl nude spanking creepy headmistress preying on the young girls thing? Then there's the whole Invisible Man raping a bunch of girls and getting them pregnant thing. (hide spoiler)] Again, more rape from Moore, although not surprising, and I think in character with Hawley Griffin. At any rate, lots of rape and suggested/potential rape. So prepare yourself, female readers. Apart from the weird representation of women (dead prostitutes as well), this was very well done and I look forward to other issues.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Octavi

    Me acabo de enamorar.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arsénico

    Y yo que iba con miedo porque en su momento vi la película y no me gustó nada... El cómic es extraordinario, y nunca mejor dicho. Dibujo excelente y guión todavía mejor. Los personajes son tan geniales que no puedes evitar cogerles cariño y devorar las páginas con avidez. 100% recomendado, tanto si lees cómics como si nunca lo has hecho y no sabes por donde empezar. Cualquier amante de la lectura lo disfrutará.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joni

    Historia en seis numeros donde se forma un super grupo de famosos personajes de la literatura victoriana, Allan Quatermain, Nemo, Jekill/Hyde, el hombre invisible y Mina Harker. Bajo el mando de Campion Bond son encargados de vigilar y luchar contra el robo de cavorita, el primer material antigravedad secuestrado con la idea de bombardear Londres por aire en las puertas del siglo XX. Muy entretenida y original obra del maestro Moore.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I read this a few years ago quickly, and Greg suggested I reread it because I didn't think it was as awesome as he did… :) It is great, I think, on rereading, getting all these nineteenth century mythical/fantastical/literary heroes together to fight crime and save England…. a lot of fun and as are most things by Dean of Comics Moore, smart and entertainingly smart. The art work by O'Neill is great, too.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review of this trade paperback at: https://bookidote.wordpress.com/2015/... Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ignacio Senao f

    Lo segundo que más me ha gustado de Alan y he leído sus obras magnas. Un autentico pulp metiendo a los personajes más clásicos de la literatura como superhéroes. Mezclando aventura, terror, steampunk … Una gozadera. Un mojón para la película.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I know the comics by Alan Moore for reading V for Vendetta and Watchmen. I had seen the movie based on this story and, as always happens, at least for the first volume the comics is better. The story is intriguing, with great graphics and twists in the right proportion. There are some scenes definitely splatter. The idea of bringing together some of the most famous literary characters of the 19th century, in a superhero team, is great! Extraordinary characters, but everyone brings his skills and I know the comics by Alan Moore for reading V for Vendetta and Watchmen. I had seen the movie based on this story and, as always happens, at least for the first volume the comics is better. The story is intriguing, with great graphics and twists in the right proportion. There are some scenes definitely splatter. The idea of bringing together some of the most famous literary characters of the 19th century, in a superhero team, is great! Extraordinary characters, but everyone brings his skills and his 'demons'. Influenced by the movie, I was surprised to find even a few unexpected characters (view spoiler)[see Moriarty, Sherlock Holmes and August Dupen (hide spoiler)] . Mina Murray is, of course, a very strong woman, strong enough to be at the head of the group, while the character of Allan Quatermain, at least initially, is in a self-destructive phase in which the reader barely recognizes the great explorer. In my edition, there is a story at the end of the comics (but chronologically previous), starring Allan Quatermain and incorporating other literary characters (view spoiler)[John Carter by Burroughs, Randolph Carter by Lovecraft, The Time Traveler by Wells (hide spoiler)] with a strong influence from the Lovecraftian universe. A real gem! One of the greatest adventures of Quatermain and perhaps the most dangerous. I really liked this first volume and I hope it’s also the next.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ana-Maria Petre

    The idea is brilliant. The artwork is incredible as well. The amount of work put in this is obviously huge, from the level of detail in the drawings to the few pages of victorian advertisements. But I feel the characters lack a certain depth. The reader is supposed to be familiar with them, but they are literary characters, and putting them in a comic book cuts away a lot of their personalities. What's more, not all of them are the way I like to remember. I don't remember Griffin (the Invisible The idea is brilliant. The artwork is incredible as well. The amount of work put in this is obviously huge, from the level of detail in the drawings to the few pages of victorian advertisements. But I feel the characters lack a certain depth. The reader is supposed to be familiar with them, but they are literary characters, and putting them in a comic book cuts away a lot of their personalities. What's more, not all of them are the way I like to remember. I don't remember Griffin (the Invisible Man) being a multiple rapist and I haven't pictured Edward Hyde as a textbook monster. Perhaps Alan Moore tried to extend ther personalities in a way, but it doesn't resonate with me. Also, the storyline is, however entertaining, quite common. I would've expected something more complex, with deeper valences. All in all, I'm a little disappointed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    A load of crap. A really cool concept (fictional characters forming a team of secret agents/superheroes) that was not well-done AT ALL. Hey, if you like rape, you'll love this book. If you like weak female characters, you'll love this book. If you like rooting for the rapists, you'll love this book. If you like your graphic novels chock full of men (but not in the fun way), you'll love this book. If you love the Castle Anthrax, but wish it had one of _those_ dungeons in it, you'll love this book. A load of crap. A really cool concept (fictional characters forming a team of secret agents/superheroes) that was not well-done AT ALL. Hey, if you like rape, you'll love this book. If you like weak female characters, you'll love this book. If you like rooting for the rapists, you'll love this book. If you like your graphic novels chock full of men (but not in the fun way), you'll love this book. If you love the Castle Anthrax, but wish it had one of _those_ dungeons in it, you'll love this book. And did I mention the rape? I hate it more and more the more I talk about it. For a fuller review, see http://www.flaminggeeks.com/tripletake/ . I'm J there. K has reviewed it so far as well. We are much in agreement.

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