kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Scene & Structure

Availability: Ready to download

Craft your fiction with scene-by-scene flow, logic and readability. An imprisoned man receives an unexpected caller, after which "everything changed..." And the reader is hooked. But whether or not readers will stay on for the entire wild ride will depend on how well the writer structures the story, scene by scene. This book is your game plan for success. Using dozens of exa Craft your fiction with scene-by-scene flow, logic and readability. An imprisoned man receives an unexpected caller, after which "everything changed..." And the reader is hooked. But whether or not readers will stay on for the entire wild ride will depend on how well the writer structures the story, scene by scene. This book is your game plan for success. Using dozens of examples from his own work - including "Dropshot," "Tiebreaker" and other popular novels - Jack M. Bickham will guide you in building a sturdy framework for your novel, whatever its form or length. You'll learn how to: -"worry" your readers into following your story to the end -prolong your main character's struggle while moving the story ahead -juggle cause and effect to serve your story action As you work on crafting compelling scenes that move the reader, moment by moment, toward the story's resolution, you'll see why believable fiction must make more sense than real life. Every scene should end in disastersome scenes should be condensed, and others built big. Whatever your story, this book can help you arrive at a happy ending in the company of satisfied readers.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Craft your fiction with scene-by-scene flow, logic and readability. An imprisoned man receives an unexpected caller, after which "everything changed..." And the reader is hooked. But whether or not readers will stay on for the entire wild ride will depend on how well the writer structures the story, scene by scene. This book is your game plan for success. Using dozens of exa Craft your fiction with scene-by-scene flow, logic and readability. An imprisoned man receives an unexpected caller, after which "everything changed..." And the reader is hooked. But whether or not readers will stay on for the entire wild ride will depend on how well the writer structures the story, scene by scene. This book is your game plan for success. Using dozens of examples from his own work - including "Dropshot," "Tiebreaker" and other popular novels - Jack M. Bickham will guide you in building a sturdy framework for your novel, whatever its form or length. You'll learn how to: -"worry" your readers into following your story to the end -prolong your main character's struggle while moving the story ahead -juggle cause and effect to serve your story action As you work on crafting compelling scenes that move the reader, moment by moment, toward the story's resolution, you'll see why believable fiction must make more sense than real life. Every scene should end in disastersome scenes should be condensed, and others built big. Whatever your story, this book can help you arrive at a happy ending in the company of satisfied readers.

30 review for Scene & Structure

  1. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    There are several good reviews already, so I will highlight some of the key components of the book. We learn about the story question, about cause and effect, and about stimulus and response. Next, we learn scene and sequel structural components. Scene classic structural components are goal, conflict and diaster. The classic structural components of sequel are emotion, thought, decision and action. We next tackle variations in scene, common errors in scene and how to fix them, and plotting with There are several good reviews already, so I will highlight some of the key components of the book. We learn about the story question, about cause and effect, and about stimulus and response. Next, we learn scene and sequel structural components. Scene classic structural components are goal, conflict and diaster. The classic structural components of sequel are emotion, thought, decision and action. We next tackle variations in scene, common errors in scene and how to fix them, and plotting with scene and sequel. Finally, we study a master plot which outlines a suggested story through its chapters. The appendices at the end of the book provides further study of key components. Scene & Structure is a good resource for beginning writers. (I understand from other reviews there exist an updated copy of this book with recent fiction excerpt examples.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Peto

    Hear ye, hear ye: I am rereading marked passages from previously read writing books right now and writing reviews, in some cases, such as now, for the first time. I admit, I may not have reviewed this one before in a selfish, misguided attempt to keep the book a secret. I apologize. It’s a gem, one of my very, very favorite writing books. It’s nuts & bolts, baby, published in 1993, and written by an author whose 80+ novels are completely unknown to me. Furthermore, I have no intention of maki Hear ye, hear ye: I am rereading marked passages from previously read writing books right now and writing reviews, in some cases, such as now, for the first time. I admit, I may not have reviewed this one before in a selfish, misguided attempt to keep the book a secret. I apologize. It’s a gem, one of my very, very favorite writing books. It’s nuts & bolts, baby, published in 1993, and written by an author whose 80+ novels are completely unknown to me. Furthermore, I have no intention of making room for them on my to-read list. They sound like outdated crap. I paraphrase but I think Ulysses S. Grant said something about everyone thinking they can be a general, whereas most people would not presume they could command a fleet of ships because of the obvious technical knowledge and skill requirements. It’s like that with readers and writing (not that I'm saying readers can't have opinions or give 1 star reviews!). I should be an expert writer, having read so much - I even majored in it!, but you can read and read and not really notice all that much. Scene & Structure will open your eyes. If you’ve read other books about structure, books that began with a focus on cause and effect, stimulus and response, and how to use that pattern to build text, books that then explained scenes and sequels and how to link them, then you may not need this book. After those basics, Bickham explores variations and “common pitfalls”. He even makes a pretty good argument for starting with this structure even if your actual writing emphasizes elements that are more likely to result in a final product that is literary or experimental, rather than commercial. If I ever get published published, I don’t owe it all to my wife, my mother, my father, my children or the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, but to Jack M. Bickham, may he RIP.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Weiland

    The reading makes for tough and tedious going at some points, but the info is well worth the dig. This is the perfect follow-up to Swain’s classic Techniques of the Selling Author (which makes sense, since Bickham was Swain’s student). It does a marvelous job of expounding on Swain’s “scenes” and “sequels” and answering many of the holes left in Swain’s necessarily abbreviated crash course. The section on structure, however, leaves much to be desired. Instead of any solid advice, the author offe The reading makes for tough and tedious going at some points, but the info is well worth the dig. This is the perfect follow-up to Swain’s classic Techniques of the Selling Author (which makes sense, since Bickham was Swain’s student). It does a marvelous job of expounding on Swain’s “scenes” and “sequels” and answering many of the holes left in Swain’s necessarily abbreviated crash course. The section on structure, however, leaves much to be desired. Instead of any solid advice, the author offers only his own personal “master plot,” which is a quick recipe for hackneyed storytelling.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Stevie

    I'm about halfway through and it is already a valuable tool. It really deals with the structure of a good story and how to push and pull the reader through without letting them get bored. I find myself getting stuck in the scenes and not looking at the big picture. This will help me create goals in the beginning so my characters will hopefully have focus and purpose. I would recommend to anyone wanting to write fiction. This book was recommeded to me by a critic who read an excerpt of my work in I'm about halfway through and it is already a valuable tool. It really deals with the structure of a good story and how to push and pull the reader through without letting them get bored. I find myself getting stuck in the scenes and not looking at the big picture. This will help me create goals in the beginning so my characters will hopefully have focus and purpose. I would recommend to anyone wanting to write fiction. This book was recommeded to me by a critic who read an excerpt of my work in progress 'Dark Angel's Kiss and now that I'm over the hurt I realize she was right. Thanks for caring enough to tell me the truth! It will be a better book because of your advise.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Great stuff here. Bickham takes the scene/sequel concept and goes into great detail on why and how to use it, how to subvert it, how to change things up when pace or plotting requires it, and so on. I had never fully understood the scene/sequel concept before reading this, and reading it, I underwent something of a mental shift around the concept. I think I've been inadvertently doing this wrong in a lot of my previous short stories and novel attempts, and even if I don't implement Bickham's meth Great stuff here. Bickham takes the scene/sequel concept and goes into great detail on why and how to use it, how to subvert it, how to change things up when pace or plotting requires it, and so on. I had never fully understood the scene/sequel concept before reading this, and reading it, I underwent something of a mental shift around the concept. I think I've been inadvertently doing this wrong in a lot of my previous short stories and novel attempts, and even if I don't implement Bickham's methods exactly (he wrote a lot of thrillers, and so that's the filter he views writing through), I think just knowing the concepts and keeping them in mind will help my writing. I tried out the basic structure in my latest short story, and I think it came out the better for it. As always with books on writing, steal whatever works for you, ignore the rest. In this case, I think a great deal of it will work for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a classic book on writing technique, focussed on writing one particular kind of book. I'd call that kind of book "action-oriented popular fiction" - basically a thriller or suspense novel. That's not to say that the techniques aren't useful for writing other kinds of books, but the less your book is like a thriller, the less useful the advice will be. I've shared extensive notes on Google+ under the hashtag "#sceneandstructure", so I won't repeat them here. However, in broad outline, Bic This is a classic book on writing technique, focussed on writing one particular kind of book. I'd call that kind of book "action-oriented popular fiction" - basically a thriller or suspense novel. That's not to say that the techniques aren't useful for writing other kinds of books, but the less your book is like a thriller, the less useful the advice will be. I've shared extensive notes on Google+ under the hashtag "#sceneandstructure", so I won't repeat them here. However, in broad outline, Bickham lays out an approach that will give you a linear story - flowing logically and naturally from a disturbing change that challenges the character at the beginning to a resolution at the end. He does this by proposing a structure he calls "scene and sequel". A scene is a moment-by-moment recounting of things that happen, starting with a character goal, moving through conflict that prevents the character from reaching the goal, and finishing with a "disaster" that leaves the character worse off than before. A sequel is about the character reacting to the scene emotionally, thinking about it, and deciding what to do next. Obviously, they follow one another neatly in alternation. This kind of stimulus/response structure also occurs at lower structural levels. It's almost fractal, though he doesn't use that word. Bickham does a beautifully clear job of explaining this, and then goes deeper, setting out how to vary the structure, how to resolve problems, and finally how to create a "master plot" to guide you through your story with the scene/sequel structure. He closes with useful appendices, giving examples from published fiction and breaking them down line by line to demonstrate his points. I'd recommend this book if your writing has ever had any of the following common criticisms: - It doesn't flow well - It doesn't make sense or is hard to follow - It fails to grip the reader - Characters do things for no logical reason in order to serve the author's plot - It's all action with no depth - It's all reflection with no action - The plot meanders with no clear purpose - It was too slow to get going - Everything fell apart in the middle - The ending made no sense and didn't follow on from what had happened previously - The villain's actions made no sense - The stakes were too low and I didn't care about them - The plot seemed contrived and ridiculous - I didn't care about what happened to the characters. Again, if your first priority isn't to keep the reader up late into the night turning the pages, this may not be the book for you. But if you have goals even vaguely adjacent to that, I strongly suggest you pick up a copy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anna Erishkigal

    I purchased this book 'used' as Writer's Digest has replaced it with a different book, but a friend recommended it to help me iron out some bugaboos in my writing. Unlike the newer book, the prose is denser and a bit more difficult to digest, but as my friend had promised, this older version of scene-writing was filled with lots of examples where the concepts are broken down in detail, tagged, and clearly labeled as you try to put the concepts in the book into action. It is structured like a col I purchased this book 'used' as Writer's Digest has replaced it with a different book, but a friend recommended it to help me iron out some bugaboos in my writing. Unlike the newer book, the prose is denser and a bit more difficult to digest, but as my friend had promised, this older version of scene-writing was filled with lots of examples where the concepts are broken down in detail, tagged, and clearly labeled as you try to put the concepts in the book into action. It is structured like a college textbook, with homework exercises at the end to put the information into practice. The newer WD book has examples from popular fiction, but they are not broken down nearly as much. I guess it's a matter of six of one and half a dozen of the other? The other WD book is better for skimming, while this book is better if you decide to sit down and step-by-step rebuild a chapter that just isn't doing what you need it to do. If you've read the 'build a scene' books and are still kinda scratching your head, grab this book if you can find it. It will be like taking a college course in scene-building.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kym McNabney

    I purchased this book on a recommendation. I did get quite a bit from it though I have to admit I had a hard time following it in many parts. The information was a bit confusing at times. I guess if one can get even one thing from a non-fiction read, it was worth reading. I did enjoy reading some of the segments of the author's novels. One particular book intrigued me enough to check out the author on the web. I was surprised to find out he wrote over 75 books, and is the author of a childhood mo I purchased this book on a recommendation. I did get quite a bit from it though I have to admit I had a hard time following it in many parts. The information was a bit confusing at times. I guess if one can get even one thing from a non-fiction read, it was worth reading. I did enjoy reading some of the segments of the author's novels. One particular book intrigued me enough to check out the author on the web. I was surprised to find out he wrote over 75 books, and is the author of a childhood movie I saw, The Apple Dumpling Gang. Even more intrigued, I dug deeper and was saddened to find that he is no longer living. All in all, I would suggest this book to any struggling and or new writer. I also plan on purchasing one of his novels that was reference in the book, Katie, Kelly, and Heck.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve Goodyear

    It gave me some good tips and ideas, but the read really didn't inspire me. I found it trying to be a little too prescriptive and formulaic for my tastes, and I think I would've had more confidence as a reader if the analysis was applied to a classic at times rather than a piece author's unpublished work.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    This book provides some nice insights on popular writing; but author Jack M. Bickham tries to boil everything down into simple formulas, and I hate formulas--which is probably why I never passed Statistics in college. There's not a whole lot that Bickham says here that you couldn't get from just picking up any best-selling novel at random and studying the author's use of structure on your own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Hobbs

    Appreciate the authors ideas! Most helpful! I highly recommend this book and will list this as the number one writing "how to" book needed by each author! Well written and well received! :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Gold

    Clear instructions on how to use the scene/sequel and stimulus/response structures in novel writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Yu

    I found this book quite useful as a novice fiction writer. Other books tend to take a top down approach to crafting a novel. This book takes a bottoms up approach, which really helped to fill in some of my knowledge gaps. Bickham talks about how to construct a beat within a scene, and ultimately how to create scenes that have good forward momentum. The foundation of stimulus-internalization-reaction and scene-sequel was enlightening to me, as it is the structure that most readers subconsciously c I found this book quite useful as a novice fiction writer. Other books tend to take a top down approach to crafting a novel. This book takes a bottoms up approach, which really helped to fill in some of my knowledge gaps. Bickham talks about how to construct a beat within a scene, and ultimately how to create scenes that have good forward momentum. The foundation of stimulus-internalization-reaction and scene-sequel was enlightening to me, as it is the structure that most readers subconsciously come to expect. With this, I feel like I now have a solid canvas to paint on, whereas before, I was writing things mostly based on feeling, which was inconsistent. The examples he gives are rather dry, but that's okay. The important part is learning about the structure.

  14. 5 out of 5

    K.R. Patterson

    Definitely one of the best writing books I've read. At first I was thinking it was going to be a knock-off of Dwight Swain's, and it was a lot like his, but this one actually helped me understand so much more than Dwight's. Though I believe Dwight did communicate these same things, it was just that presented this way--a slightly different way--it all became so much more clear. I especially loved the end, when it gives an example plot outline. LOVED that! I've always wanted someone to do that. Th Definitely one of the best writing books I've read. At first I was thinking it was going to be a knock-off of Dwight Swain's, and it was a lot like his, but this one actually helped me understand so much more than Dwight's. Though I believe Dwight did communicate these same things, it was just that presented this way--a slightly different way--it all became so much more clear. I especially loved the end, when it gives an example plot outline. LOVED that! I've always wanted someone to do that. That alone made the book 5 stars for me. Most of all, it made me realize I need to quit fighting the system and just go with it. It's only when you know the rules, and know them well, that you should ever veer off the path.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Louden

    dated at times, hard to get into (hence why on my shelves for so long) but super useful, esp. for thriller and action /adventure novelists.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alison McMahan

    Includes the clearest explanation of MRU violations (motivation reaction units) since Dwight V. Swain himself, along with an inspiring explanation of scene & sequel. A must for every fiction writer.

  17. 5 out of 5

    C.H. Knyght

    Dang, it's been a long time since I read this, but it was one of the foundation block to my journey as an author.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Weinstein

    Another excellent source to stimulate better writing.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Shirk

    This book has a lot of good, useful information, especially chapter ten: common errors in scenes and how to fix them. But the book was a bit dry in parts so it took me awhile to read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joanie Bruce

    This is a great book for seasoned authors as well as beginners. It really teaches you to make sure you have a reaction to everything in your story. It's also a great tool for building your plot.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Newton Nitro

    O “Elements of Fiction Writing” é uma série de livros extremamente úteis para escritores, cada livro focando em elementos essenciais da escrita. Estou lendo em ordem, e finalmente cheguei no Scene and Structure, de Jack Bickham, que apesar de pequeno, é um dos melhores e mais claros guias sobre Cena e Estrutura narrativa. A idéia por trás da coleção Elements of Fiction Writing é passar os conceitos básicos da arte da escrita, acumulados pela experiência dos escritores. Assim como uma pessoa que f O “Elements of Fiction Writing” é uma série de livros extremamente úteis para escritores, cada livro focando em elementos essenciais da escrita. Estou lendo em ordem, e finalmente cheguei no Scene and Structure, de Jack Bickham, que apesar de pequeno, é um dos melhores e mais claros guias sobre Cena e Estrutura narrativa. A idéia por trás da coleção Elements of Fiction Writing é passar os conceitos básicos da arte da escrita, acumulados pela experiência dos escritores. Assim como uma pessoa que for trabalhar com design gráfico deve aprender conceitos como “contraste”, “composição”, “paleta de cor, de tons”, etc. um escritor só tem a ganhar ao aprender conceitos básicos como cena, sequência, conflito, estímulo-resposta, internalização, etc. De posse dessas ferramentas técnicas, o foco do esforço do escritor fica mais ligado a parte de criação e arte. O livro procura responder várias perguntas do ponto de vista de um escritor, como, por exemplo: O que é uma cena? Qual é o propósito de uma cena em uma narrativa? Como uma cena se posiciona dentro de uma estrutura narrativa? Qual é a estrutura de uma cena? Como se conecta uma cena com outra? Bickham responde essas e muitas outras perguntas em grande detalhe, e com exemplos práticos (que correspondem a uma grande parte do livro, e ajudam muito na compreensão). Os exemplos servem para ilustrar os princípios e técnicas discutidas ao longo do livro. Fica a recomendação, o livro é muito bom para se compreender e usar o conceito de cenas e de sequências, entre outros. Durante a leitura fiz algumas anotações, que vou postar logo abaixo. Espero que sejam úteis, mesmo sem os extensos exemplos que aparecem no livro. E isso é só algumas coisas que peguei do livro, uma pequena parte, que certamente vou colocar em vídeos posteriores do NitroDicas. :D ANOTAÇÕES DO SCENE AND STRUCTURE Fatos sobre leitores: * Eles, em sua maioria, são fascinados por mudanças significativas na vida dos personagens. * Eles, em sua maioria, querem uma história que comece com tal mudança. * Eles, em sua maioria, querem ter uma “pergunta de história” para se preocuparem. (será que o protagonista vai ser bem sucedido? vai sobreviver? vai conseguir o amor de sua vida? vai fugir? vai vencer a oposição? etc.) * Eles, em sua maioria, rapidamente perdem a paciência com tudo que não estiver relacionado diretamente com a “pergunta da história”. Plano para estruturar uma trama de história: 1. Considere todos os materiais que você imaginou. Identifique, na sua história, os momentos em que as cenas importantes acontecem. Elimine tudo que não contribua para o impacto emocional e o entendimento dessas cenas importantes. 2. Pense sobre o que motiva o seu personagem, o que o incomoda, o que poderá causar a maior reação emocional nele e que tipo de vida anterior ele teve que o levou a reagir dessa forma. Planeje cenas que ataquem diretamente essa motivação, esses pontos fracos do seu personagem. 3. Identifique ou crie uma situação dramática ou evento que irá colocar o seu personagem em um momento significante e ameaçador de mudança. 4. Planeje a sua narrativa para abrir com esse evento significante de mudança. 5. Decida qual é a intenção ou objetivo que seu personagem mais importante terá para resolver a nova situação que se encontra, depois da mudança significativa na cena inicial da narrativa. Esse objetivo se transformará na “pergunta da história” , que surgirá na mente do leitor. 6. Imagine como será a jornada do protagonista para alcançar o seu objetivo principal. 7. Imagine quando e como a pergunta da história será resolvida. 8. Com o ponto de partida e de chegada planejados (ou esboçados), desenvolva as narrativas paralelas que acontecerão no meio, lembrando que elas devem sempre orbitar em torno da pergunta principal da história. A narrativa contemporânea é rápida, ágil e direto ao ponto. Sua unidade básica é o estímulo - resposta, as frases que compõe as cenas se alternam (ou deveriam se alternar) entre estímulo e resposta. Estímulo + Internalização + Resposta geram o fluxo narrativo e tornam plausível para o leitor, mantendo a suspensão de descrença necessária para se imergir em uma história. A alternância de Estímulo+Internalização+Resposta gera a “ilusão de realidade”. Exemplo: “Pedro viu a onça em cima da árvore” (estímulo) “Ele engoliu seco e pensou “vou morrer agora!” (internalização) “Ele sacou sua pistola e deu um tiro.” (resposta). Quando a narrativa mostra “respostas” sem ligá-las a um “estímulo” claro, o leitor fica confuso e quebra a suspensão de descrença. Exemplo: “Ele engoliu seco.” (internalização) “Ele sacou sua pistola e deu um tiro.” (resposta) “Pedro viu a onça em cima da árvore” (estímulo) Em cada simples construção de narrativa em termos de causas e efeitos ou melhor, estímulos e respostas, deve se manter os seguintes princícios em mente: 1. Estímulos precisam ser externos, ou seja ação, diálogo, algo que pode ser testemunhado como se estivesse sendo feito em um palco de teatro. 2. Respostas também são externas, da mesma maneira que os estímulos. 3. Internalizações, como próprio nome diz, são internas, são as emoções, os pensamentos, as sensações, que o personagem ponto de vista da cena sente em relação ao estímulo. 4. Para cada estímulo você precisa mostrar uma resposta. 5. Para cada resposta desejada (ou para cada ação do personagem), você precisa criar e mostrar para o leitor um estímulo ou uma motivação internalizada. (decisão feita a partir dos pensamentos do personagem ponto de vista). 6. Uma resposta deve se seguir diretamente a um estímulo. 7. Se a resposta a um estímulo não parece lógica na superfície, você precisa explicar posteriormente ou dar bases lógicas para a resposta antes dela acontecer. 8. O Padrão Básico é Estímulo - Resposta ou Estímulo - Internalização - Resposta. 9. Você trabalha a Internalização quando for necessário transformar uma transação (estímulo - resposta) da narrativa em algo compreensível e com credibilidade. Veja na sua própria escrita. Cheque cuidadosamente para ter certeza que você está mostrando as causas para os efeitos desejados, e está mostrando os efeitos de causas que já apareceram em momentos anteriores da narrativa. Olhe também, para suas menores transações de estímulo-resposta: Para cada estímulo, você mostra uma resposta? Para cada resposta, você mostrou um estímulo externo e imediato? Em transações complexas, em momentos complexos da narrativa, você passou informação para o seu leitor por meio de uma internalização explicativa? Internalização é o monólogo interior, os pensamentos, emoções e reações internas do seu personagem POV (o que tem o Ponto de Vista narrativo da cena). O PADRÃO DE UMA CENA Existem tradicionalmente dois tipos de elementos narrativos básicos, as Cenas e as Sequências. CENAS são os momentos EXTERNOS em que o protagonista está ativo na trama, onde ele age no mundo em sua volta em busca de um objetivo. O foco de uma Cena está na interação do personagem com o mundo ao seu redor. Podem e devem conter internalizações curtas, mas o foco está nos eventos externos. SEQUÊNCIAS é a reação INTERNA ao que aconteceu em uma Cena, uma reação interior, ou uma verbalização de um processo interior de reação, entendimento, reflexão e criação de um novo objetivo. É o momento narrativo que o personagem reage ou digere psicológicamente o que aconteceu na Cena. É uma internalização extensa. As Sequências são bons momentos para se colocar um flashback (uma cena que se passa no passado) ou um backflash (uma frase que alude rapidamente a eventos no passado). Sequências podem (e devem) conter eventos externos, mas estes são curtos ou servem apenas de base para a sequência (por exemplo, uma sequência clássica é o protagonista confessando seu drama interno para um amigo íntimo, a conversa é uma ação externa mas o foco narrativo está nas reações emocionais e posteriormente racionais do protagonista ao que acontece nas cenas anteriores). A prosa contemporânea mistura esses dois momentos em configurações complexas, com cenas e sequências se alternando rapidamente. Porém, a título didático, é interessante notar esses dois momentos, o momento do foco nas Açôes Externas e o momento do foco nas Reações Internas dos protagonistas de uma narrativa., Além da Cena e Sequência, temos CENAS DE PREPARAÇÃO (partes de Cenas onde se prepara o conflito, criando o background necessário para que o impacto emocional do desastre ou complicação no final da cena seja enfatizado) e TRANSIÇÕES (parágrafos que estabelecem transições de tempo e espaço entre as Cenas e Sequências, normalmente feitos em sumários narrativos. ESTRUTURA DE UMA CENA Uma cena normalmente é estruturada da seguinte forma: 1) Declaração do Objetivo da Cena Essa declaração é normalmente feita pelo personagem mais envolvido no conflito da cena. Exemplo: A cena começa com um personagem gritando "eu vou te matar!", claramente mostrando o objetivo principal do conflito central da cena. Existem milhares de formas de mostrar ou declarar o objetivo de uma cena. 2) Introdução e desenvolvimento do conflito central da Cena. Esse é o coração de uma cena. Enquanto houver conflito, a cena mantém o interesse do leitor e mantém sua tensão. No momento em que o conflito é resolvido, a cena se encerra. O conflito deve ser mantido em uma crescente de dificuldades para o protagonista, uma crescente de complicações. 3) Falha, complicação final, desastre, uma vitória parcial, ou outra variação que leva a trama adiante. É o que acontece com o personagem em sua tentativa de atingir o seu objetivo na cena. Ao criar cenas é importante considerar os objetivos dos personagens envolvidos em uma cena, os ângulos do conflito (os diversos interesses envolvidos no conflito de uma cena), e a natureza da complicação que fechará a cena, e a direção que essa complicação dará para a narrativa. Ao editar cenas, observe os seguintes pontos: 1) O objetivo das cenas devem estar relacionados com a questão principal da narrativa. 2) O conflito de uma cena tem que estar relacionado com o objetivo do protagonista nessa determinada cena. Se o objetivo do protagonista em uma cena muda, o conflito deve mudar de acordo. 3) O conflito em uma cena deve ser com outra pessoa, ou outro elemento externo. Conflitos internos acontecem em sequências ou são apenas pontilhados em uma cena por meio de internalizações curtas. Quando essas internalizações aumentam de tamanho, uma sequência se inicia dentro de uma cena, o que torna a narrativa mais lenta (mas que pode aumentar o realismo psicológico, caso seja necessário). 4) Cenas não podem ser planejadas isoladamente, elas devem estar integradas com suas sequências e com toda a narrativa. 5) O melhor é manter um Ponto de Vista por cena, para evitar confusões na leitura. Como toda regra de narrativa, existem exemplos de grandes mestres da literatura que quebram essa dica, mas eles assim o fazem com algum objetivo específico e contextualizado na narrativa. ERROS COMUNS EM CENAS Uma cena com muitos personagens envolvidos, tende a diminuir o conflito. O melhor conflito é entre duas pessoas, ou, se houver muitos personagens em uma cena, usar de artifícios para centrar o conflito entre dois personagens mais importantes para a cena. 1) Circularidade do conflito. O conflito tem que ser resolvido, de uma forma ou de outra, de preferência, causando complicações para o protagonista. Se o conflito chega a um impasse e a narrativa fica apenas repetindo o conflito, a trama para e a cena perde o seu sentido dentro da narrativa. 2) Perder o foco da cena. Um conflito por cena é o ideal. 3) Antagonista sem motivação em relação ao conflito principal da cena. 4) Discórdia sem base lógica dentro da narrativa, o famoso “discordar por discordar”. 5) Desastres ou complicações do final da cena que são “forçadas”, ou causadas por algo que não tem relação direta com a cena. ESTRUTURA DE UMA SEQUÊNCIA Uma Sequência tem a seguinte estrutura (mas não necessáriamente todos esses elementos): 1) Reação emocional e física ao que aconteceu na cena. 2) Reação racional, dilema, busca de um novo objetivo, de uma solução para superar o desastre ou complicação causada pela cena. 3) Criação de um novo objetivo, cuja busca irá gerar uma nova cena. Uma sequência começa para o seu personagem POV no momento em que uma cena termina. Atingido pelo desastre ou complicação do final da cena, o personagem reage emocionalmente, seguido mais tarde por um período de reflexão, que pode, cedo ou tarde, se transformar em uma nova decisão, em um novo objetivo que o levará a uma nova cena. Uma sequência se estrutura em EMOÇÃO - PENSAMENTO - DECISÃO - AÇÃO Cenas são excitantes, cheias de conflito, ação, diálogo, ou seja, de leitura rápida. Mais cenas deixam o livro de leitura mais rápida e excitante, porém as sequências são necessárias para dar mais profundidade psicológica aos personagens e aumentar a plausabilidade da história. Sequências, por outro lado, são reflexivas, psicológicas, emocionais, podem ou não conter memórias, considerações, ter sumários narrativos expositivos etc. As sequências tornam a leitura mais lenta, mas servem para aprofundar na caracterização e dão mais realismo psicológico para a história. O segredo é equilibrar Sequências e Cenas dentro da proposta da narrativa. Narrativas de ação, por exemplo, tentem a ter mais cenas do que sequências, e as sequências, quando aparecem, são curtíssimas, servindo apenas para que o protagonista tome fôlego para uma nova cena. Romances mais literários (por exemplo, livros da Clarice Lispector), costumam possuir mais sequências do que cenas, muitas vezes porque o foco narrativo está na exploração da psicologia dos personagens. Cada escritor deve dosar cenas e sequências em suas narrativas. Se a história está rápida demais, aumente as sequências. Se está arrastada e lenta, diminua as sequências e crie mais cenas. VARIAÇÕES DE CENAS E SEQUÊNCIAS Os escritores tendem a variar e a elaborar estruturas complexas com esses elementos, por exemplo combinando duas cenas e suas sequências em uma unidade narrativa, criando cenas que acabam sem que o conflito principal esteja resolvido, colocando mini-sequências dentro de uma cena, criando uma narrativa externa (o que acontece do lado de fora do personagem) e uma narrativa interna (o que acontece do lado de dentro do personagem), etc. Quanto mais terrível for o desastre no final de uma cena, mais desenvolvida terá que ser sua sequência; pois o personagem terá que fazer uma jornada psicológica mais profunda, para se recuperar da gravidade do desastre, se reestruturar e criar um novo objetivo. ALGUMAS DICAS ADICIONAIS 1. Tenha certeza que o objetivo da cena seja claramente relevante para a narrativa e esteja ligado à pergunta principal levantada pela história (a pergunta da história, por exemplo, no Senhor dos Anéis, é “Será que Sauron será derrotado?” e as cenas da saga, de um modo ou de outro se ligam a essa pergunta). 2. Declare por meio da narrativa, a relevância da cena descrita. Quanto mais claro melhor! 3. Tenha certeza que você passou para o leitor as motivações do personagem antagonista de uma cena, ou faça que o antagonista declare sua motivação (ou demonstre) logo no começo de uma cena. Observe esse padrão em filmes e livros, e veja como diferentes autores lidam com o antagonismo em suas cenas. 4. Busque sempre novos ângulos em um conflito de uma cena, novas formas de complicar e aumentar a tensão de uma cena. 5. Reflita e trabalhe a complicação ou desastre que encerrará a cena, buscando surpreender o leitor ao mesmo tempo que se mantém coerência narrativa. Faça uma lista de várias formas de complicações diferentes para encerrar uma cena e escolha a que vai causar mais dificuldades para o protagonista. Provavelmente será a que vai causar mais surpresa para o leitor. 6. Diálogo é uma ferramenta para criar conflitos em sua narrativa. Conflitos e como seus personagens reagem a eles é uma ferramenta de caracterização. Use-os! 7. Lembre-se, ao construir o conflito dentro de uma cena e planejar o seu desastre, de que as pessoas não são completamente racionais, especialmente em situações de estresse. Faça o seu antagonista perder o auto-controle ou fazer algo que seria loucura em outras circunstâncias. Pense sobre esse personagem que você construiu e se sua loucura parece estar “dentro do personagem”, se está contexualizada na cena, e depois pense se ele pode cometer algum erro estúpido. Os personagens de sua história, mesmo nas cenas mais difíceis, não devem ser robôs racionais (a não ser que isso seja a definição do personagem). Seres humanos são incoerentes, imprevisíveis, principalmente em situações de conflito. 8. Ao revisar uma cena, sempre pense em como você pode aumentar o seu impacto na narrativa, pense se ela está desenvolvendo personagem, avançando a trama ou compondo e reforçando o tom e o tema da narrativa. Uma cena deve sempre trabalhar um ou mais desses elementos. 9. Nunca deixe seus personagens relaxarem em uma cena, mantenha sempre a tensão, a ansiedade do resultado, o conflito que mantém o seu protagonista lutando, buscando, enfrentando, agindo dentro de uma cena. TRANSIÇÕES Transição é uma declaração direta ao leitor indicando uma mudança de tempo, lugar ou ponto de vista da narrativa, ligando uma cena a outra, ou uma cena a uma sequência. Por exemplo “três horas mais tarde, na delegacia do Delegado Gordon…”. Transições podem ser simples ou complexas, podem intercalar cenas ou acontecer dentro de uma cena, ligando dois momentos diferentes. CENAS DE PREPARAÇÃO (SETUP SCENES) São cenas que não possuem conflito e que servem apenas para caracterizar, e criar um background para o conflito principal de uma cena futura. Um exemplo clássico é a série de mini-cenas de um casal de namorados passeando em vários lugares, trocando juras de amor e carinhos, que serve para aumentar o impacto emocional de uma cena de separação, que acontecerá mais tarde. Uma dica com Cenas de Preparação é que devem ser curtas, ou conter mini-conflitos não tão relevantes assim e que sirvam apenas para caracterizar ou reforçar tom e tema da narrativa. DIVISÃO DE CAPÍTULOS O melhor lugar para encerrar um capítulo é no final de uma cena, no desastre ou complicação que encerra a cena. Outra opção é encerrar um capítulo no final de uma sequência, onde o personagem conseguiu criar um novo objetivo que dará prosseguimento a trama. Não existe nenhum padrão para o tamanho de capítulos. Alguns escritores gostam de capítulos curtos, para serem lidos em uma sessão de leitura de 20 minutos. Outros preferem capítulos mais longos. O importante é manter um senso de narrativa, os capítulos devem dar o ritmo e manter o leitor querendo ler mais. Use o espaço entre os parágrafos como transições, para introduzir um novo ponto de vista, para introduzir uma passagem de tempo, etc.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Turok Tucker

    Two takeaways up to the point: there are lots of books on plot, few on the actual construction of how to make said plot. For every 15 books that muse, there's one that treats you like a person with a job trying to grow your knowledge. Thank God this is the latter, and in an absolute zero frills method SCENE & STRUCTURE gives a writer learning the craft of writing a great scene some meat and potatoes. I was feeling SOL before this book in getting a good grasp on the dramatic unit - brick in th Two takeaways up to the point: there are lots of books on plot, few on the actual construction of how to make said plot. For every 15 books that muse, there's one that treats you like a person with a job trying to grow your knowledge. Thank God this is the latter, and in an absolute zero frills method SCENE & STRUCTURE gives a writer learning the craft of writing a great scene some meat and potatoes. I was feeling SOL before this book in getting a good grasp on the dramatic unit - brick in the wall - that are scenes. Why is the fundamental component of modern fiction have a blank spot on the bookshelf, while three million books on the muse are ready to fill any wordless hack with the solid form of passing gas. SCENE AND STRUCTURE gets tough, ready for three reads on this puppy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mugizi Rwebangira

    The basic concept it focuses on is "cause and effect". Make sure everything in your plot follows logically from previous elements. Build your story and your scenes step by step. i.e. make sure there is a goal for each scene, and that that goal advances the goal of the chapter which in turn advances the goal of the entire story, etc. This is good advice, and eye-opening if you didn't consider how to structure a scene before, but it quickly gets extremely tedious once he gets into the details. Now, I The basic concept it focuses on is "cause and effect". Make sure everything in your plot follows logically from previous elements. Build your story and your scenes step by step. i.e. make sure there is a goal for each scene, and that that goal advances the goal of the chapter which in turn advances the goal of the entire story, etc. This is good advice, and eye-opening if you didn't consider how to structure a scene before, but it quickly gets extremely tedious once he gets into the details. Now, I'll be fair, I think this book is best for more advanced and serious writers who have the patience to determinedly dig into all the detail, but it was very dry reading for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joed Jackson

    While I have read 2 or 3 other books that covered the subject (and those books each brought value to the table), this is 'the one.' No one book can teach a guy (or gal) to write but this one puts you a big, big step forward. My understanding and insight to the bricks and mortar of fiction writing are on a whole new level. This one will stay close to my writing desk and will find many more sticky notes in it (already has a bunch). So yeah, I definitely recommend this to any and all writers of fic While I have read 2 or 3 other books that covered the subject (and those books each brought value to the table), this is 'the one.' No one book can teach a guy (or gal) to write but this one puts you a big, big step forward. My understanding and insight to the bricks and mortar of fiction writing are on a whole new level. This one will stay close to my writing desk and will find many more sticky notes in it (already has a bunch). So yeah, I definitely recommend this to any and all writers of fiction.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew McAndrew

    This book never seemed to end for me. Though the topic was one worth exploring, I remember feeling like the author repeated the same information a lot. To be fair, though, it could have been where my mind was at at the time that made me feel that way, so I'll generously add a third star.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Plummer

    Good Information but the reading was very tedious. Considered repeatedly to quit but finally fought my way through, felt like wading through a big, though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Britt Malka

    I bought this because somebody advised to read this before Swain's book, and I'm glad I did. It's a quick read that gives good insight into using scenes and sequels.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Great ideas, deeply indebted to Dwight Swain, are presented concisely here. The examples, however, are terrible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zara West

    Well-written with many strong examples. This book builds on Swain's classic and makes the structure of a scene understandable. Good for writers just beginning,

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bri

    Lots of good no-nonsense advice for genre fiction.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.