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Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. *********************** Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************************************


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Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. *********************** Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************************************

30 review for Right Ho, Jeeves

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    This is almost as funny as The Code of the Woosters, which is saying a lot, since Code is the funniest book ever written by anybody anywhere. The plot isn't important: as usual, misunderstandings and peevishness disrupt the general mood of an old English country house, lovers are parted and social bonds are threatened, but by the end--thanks to the inimitable Jeeves-- tranquility is restored, couples are reunited, and--most important of all--aunts are placated. The justly famous climax where a t This is almost as funny as The Code of the Woosters, which is saying a lot, since Code is the funniest book ever written by anybody anywhere. The plot isn't important: as usual, misunderstandings and peevishness disrupt the general mood of an old English country house, lovers are parted and social bonds are threatened, but by the end--thanks to the inimitable Jeeves-- tranquility is restored, couples are reunited, and--most important of all--aunts are placated. The justly famous climax where a tipsy Gussie Fink-Nottle delivers the prize speech at the Market Snodsbury Grammar School may be the most hilarious passage in all of Wodehouse, but since it occurs three-quarters of the way through the novel, I feared that the last seventy-five pages or so might be something of a letdown. I needn't have worried. Jeeve's resolution of all the difficult strands of the situation is so quietly effective that I can give it no greater praise than by deeming it--in Jeevesian parlance--"most satisfactory."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Algernon (Darth Anyan)

    Who needs expensive Freudian psychiatrists when you can have this: The discovery of some toy duck in the soap dish, presumably the property of some former juvenile visitor, contributed not a little to this new and happier frame of mind. What with one thing and another, I hadn't played with toy ducks in my bath for years, and I found the novel experience most invigorating. For the benefit of those interested, I may mention that if you shove the thing under the surface with the sponge and then let Who needs expensive Freudian psychiatrists when you can have this: The discovery of some toy duck in the soap dish, presumably the property of some former juvenile visitor, contributed not a little to this new and happier frame of mind. What with one thing and another, I hadn't played with toy ducks in my bath for years, and I found the novel experience most invigorating. For the benefit of those interested, I may mention that if you shove the thing under the surface with the sponge and then let it go, it shoots out of the water in a manner calculated to divert the most careworn. Ten minutes of this and I was enabled to return to the bedchamber much more the merry old Bertram. Old Bertram is in dire need of moral bracing, since one of his recurring spats over wardrobe with his trusted man Jeeves has left him without valuable advice just when he needed it most. Valiant efforts to solve the problems of his friends and family gathered at Brinkley Court on his own are only serving to further push him deeper into the soup. Bertie blames it on bad luck and on the French: If I hadn't gone to Cannes, I shouldn't have met the Bassett or bought that white mess jacket, and Angela wouldn't have met her shark, and Aunt Dahlia wouldn't have played baccarat. If you want to find the connection between sharks, white mess jackets, baccarat, devil's costumes, newts and French cooking you have come to the right place at Brinkley Court. Be careful though of Bertie's 'clever' plans, and keep Gussie Fink-Nottle away from the strong spirits. As his Aunt Dahlia rather cruelly but truthfully puts it: You may well say 'Golly!'. Anatole, God's gift to the gastric juices, gone like the dew off the petal of a rose, all through your idiocy. After reading four or five Jeeves short stories collections in a row I was just in the right disposition for a more substantial fare, and the master didn't disappoint. Right Ho, Jeeves is one of Wodehouse's best novels, showcasing his talent to weave together several storylines and to ramp up the mischief and hijinks to stratospheric levels, where even the imperturbable gentleman's gentleman Jeeves would be hard put to come up with a solution. Some of the faces are familiar, as are some of the romantic missteps that crop up in almost every Wodehouse story, but there is something about how the different characters come together and interact that make me appreciate the long form better than the above mentioned short stories. This splittig of the troubles into four or five separate incidents makes it a little harder to pick a main plot line in the novel, but, judging by screen time and by the laughter-meter, I would pick August Fink-Nottle as the leader of the pack. This old school friend of Bertie, this 'newt-nuzzling blister' as he is more or less affectionately referred to, has fallen in love. And because he is pathologically shy and accident prone, he appeals to Jeeves as a go-between. As you might remember, Jeeves and Bertie had a tiff over a dinner jacket, so Bertie takes, reluctantly, the role of Cupid: A splendid chap, of course, in many ways - courteous, amiable, and just the fellow to tell you what to do till the doctor came, if you had a sick newt on your hands - but quite obviously not of Mendelssohn's March timber. I have no doubt that you could have flung bricks by the hour in England's most densely populated districts without endangering the safety of a single girl capable of becoming Mrs. Augustus Fink-Nottle without an anaesthetic. Yet such a girl resides presently at Brinkley Court: Madeline Bassett, another gold-plated comedy arrow in the author's quiver. A sensitive, poetic soul, whose exclamations about daisy chains and fluffy rabbits in the meadows are apt to give even the strongest man the shivers: ... the thought of being engaged to a girl who talked openly about fairies being born because stars blew their noses, or whatever it was, frankly appalled me. confesses Bertie, yet that's exactly where his efforts on behalf of Gussie lands him. It's enough to turn our bachelor friend to despair: I've said it before, and I'll say it again - girls are rummy. Old Pop Kipling never said a truer word than when he made that crack about the f. of the s. being more d. than the m. Gussie and the Bassett are not the only couple trying to mend up the ties of love. Bertie's cousin Angela is on the warpath with her fiancee, another Wodehouse recurring character and frenemy of Bertie, Tuppy Glossop. Add to the double dose of romance the volatile temper of the Brinkley Court's celebrated cook Anatole and the sour disposition of the lord of the manor, and you have the main ingredients of the soup Bertie is currently wallowing in. Well, I'm dashed. I'm really dashed. I positively am dashed, Jeeves. finally confesses the master after all his best efforts misfire, and he goes back, as the reader already knew he would, to his trusted servant for rescue. But can even Jeeves transform a newt like Gussie into a dragon? Only active measures, promptly applied, can provide this poor, pusillanimous poop with the proper pep. Don't you just love this alliterative game? But what can he be talking about? I am still cracking with laughter as I remember the effect of alcohol on the timid man's disposition: It just shows, what any member of Parliament will tell you, that if you want real oratory, the preliminary noggin is essential. Unless pie-eyed, you cannot hope to grip. (I should try the recipe when writing my reviews. Maybe they will be as popular as Gussie's speechmaking under the influence) On a personal level, I am most grateful to P G Wodehouse for making me fall in love with the English language all over again. I feel so lucky to be able to enjoy his prose in the original club vernacular, even as I dive to the dictionary for "sedulously" (diligent in application or attention; persevering; assiduous.) or "hornswoggle"(to swindle, cheat, hoodwink, or hoax.). Even his insults have style, inventivity, and his short portraits are unrivaled in the field of comedy: - Uncle Tom who always looked a bit like a pterodactyl with a secret sorrow. - Tuppy : If you can visualize a bulldog which has just been kicked in the ribs and had its dinner sneaked by the cat, you will have Hildebrand Glossop as he now stood before me. - Aunt Dahlia: She looked like a tomato struggling for self-expression. also: ... the nearest thing to a charging rhinoceros. Recurrent jokes that are continued from one story to another are another secret ingredient mixed by Wodehouse into his recipe for success. I have already mentioned the wardrobe malfunctions. Another example is the reference to the habit of Jeeves to move about silently: My private belief, as I think I have mentioned before, is that Jeeves doesn't have to open doors. He's like one of those birds in India who bung their astral bodies about - the chaps, I mean, who having gone into thin air in Bombay, reassemble the parts and appear two minutes later in Calcutta. Only some such theory will account for the fact that he's not there one moment and is there the next. He just seems to float from Spot A to Spot B like some form of gas. or, I dismissed Jeeves with a nod, and he flickered for a moment and was gone. Many a spectre would have been less slippy. I am sure the author will come with a fresh twist on the old jokes for his next novel, and this is one of the reasons I am glad that he was so productive and that I have so many more of his novels to enjoy in the future. Recommended as the best remedy for a sour disposition. If you haven't yet read one of Wodehouse farces, this is a good introduction to his style.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Bertie Wooster takes the reins from his gentleman's gentleman Jeeves, who had everything well enough in hand, and soon everything's gone pear-shaped, if that's the expression I'm looking for. Bertie's well-intentioned schemings upset his aunt and uncle's brilliant French chef, who gives notice, which upsets everyone's gastric juices! Meanwhile his meddling upon a friend's behalf almost divorces Bertie himself from his beloved bachelorhood, egads! When one comes to the realization that they are a Bertie Wooster takes the reins from his gentleman's gentleman Jeeves, who had everything well enough in hand, and soon everything's gone pear-shaped, if that's the expression I'm looking for. Bertie's well-intentioned schemings upset his aunt and uncle's brilliant French chef, who gives notice, which upsets everyone's gastric juices! Meanwhile his meddling upon a friend's behalf almost divorces Bertie himself from his beloved bachelorhood, egads! When one comes to the realization that they are a first class idiot, it's time to throw in the towel and call the National Guard...or even better, Jeeves. Well now, how can you go wrong with a comedy that has "Right Ho" taking up two-thirds of its title? You can not, my old bean, you can not. Add in a generous helping of Gussie Fink-Nottles, Madeline Bassetts and Tuppy Glossops and you have yourself a school prize winner! Drunken awards speeches and other kooky hijinks abound!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    The 2012 re-read Gussie Fink-Nottle is in love with Madeline Bassett but can't seem to talk to her. Madeline Bassett is in love with Gussie Fink-Nottle but thinks Bertie Wooster wants to marry her. Bertie's cousin Angela was engaged to Tuppy Glossop but they had a bust-up over whether or not Angela saw a shark. Can Jeeves put them all back together? He might have been able to, had he and Bertie not had a falling out over Bertie's white mess jacket... First off, this review will hardly be unbiased The 2012 re-read Gussie Fink-Nottle is in love with Madeline Bassett but can't seem to talk to her. Madeline Bassett is in love with Gussie Fink-Nottle but thinks Bertie Wooster wants to marry her. Bertie's cousin Angela was engaged to Tuppy Glossop but they had a bust-up over whether or not Angela saw a shark. Can Jeeves put them all back together? He might have been able to, had he and Bertie not had a falling out over Bertie's white mess jacket... First off, this review will hardly be unbiased. My love for P.G. Wodehouse is such that if the zombie apocalypse occured and Wodehouse came staggering toward me with a lust for brains, I would be completely unwilling to shoot him. The second full-length Jeeves and Wooster novel is a big improvement over the first. The writing is crisper, the similes even more hilarious, and Jeeves and Wooster function like a well-oiled machine. Once again, the rift between Jeeves and Wooster was used as a plot device, more effectively than in Thank You, Jeeves. As usual, quotable lines are in abundance. As usual, I did not write any of them down while I was reading. "Lack of appetite? I'm as hollow as the Grand Canyon!" "The exquisite code of politeness of the Woosters prevented me clipping her one on the ear-hole." The strength of the Jeeves and Wooster books is that Bertie is a bit of a fathead, and he performs the role admirably in Right ho, Jeeves. Bertie thinking he could be as good as Jeeves at solving problems? Pshaw, I say! Once things are suitably muddled, Jeeves saves the day, as he always does. I do not consider the previous sentence a spoiler since it happens in every Jeeves book. Funny moments abound, many of them centering on a drunken Gussie Fink-Nottle. Aunt Dahlia is in fine form. Tuppy, Angela, and Madeline Bassett were negligible but still had their moments. Right Ho, Jeeves, the second Jeeves and Wooster novel, is a much better read than the first. Wodehouse is the master of the bumbling romantic comedy. Four easy stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    In 2012, I was elected the Vice President of our college alumni association here in the UAE. I was to take charge at our annual get-together: at the same event, I presented an ottamthullal, a satirical dance-drama which was a runaway hit. What with all the celebratory euphoria, I imbibed a little too much of the happy juice in the parking lot outside the venue (drinks were not allowed in the hall) and before I knew it, I was pickled to the gills. You can see me with a beatific smile as I took the In 2012, I was elected the Vice President of our college alumni association here in the UAE. I was to take charge at our annual get-together: at the same event, I presented an ottamthullal, a satirical dance-drama which was a runaway hit. What with all the celebratory euphoria, I imbibed a little too much of the happy juice in the parking lot outside the venue (drinks were not allowed in the hall) and before I knew it, I was pickled to the gills. You can see me with a beatific smile as I took the stage later in the day. See the serenity of the countenance: And here I am, shaking hands with the President. I don't remember what I was saying to him. In fact, I don't remember much of the afternoon. ------------------------------------- Here's Bertie Wooster, talking about Gussie Fink-Nottle, about to distribute the prizes at Market Snodsbury School. When I was able to see clearly once more, I perceived that Gussie was now seated. He had his hands on his knees, with his elbows out at right angles, like a nigger minstrel of the old school about to ask Mr. Bones why a chicken crosses the road, and he was staring before him with a smile so fixed and pebble-beached that I should have thought that anybody could have guessed that there sat one in whom the old familiar juice was plashing up against the back of the front teeth. Many people would have guessed the same thing about me that day! ------------------------------------- Fortunately, I was not called on to give a speech - like Gussie was. If it had happened, I'm sure the script would have gone something like the passage reproduced below. ...Gussie, having stretched his arms and yawned a bit, switched on that pebble-beached smile again and tacked down to the edge of the platform. "Speech," he said affably. He then stood with his thumbs in the armholes of his waistcoat, waiting for the applause to die down. It was some time before this happened, for he had got a very fine hand indeed. I suppose it wasn't often that the boys of Market Snodsbury Grammar School came across a man public-spirited enough to call their head master a silly ass, and they showed their appreciation in no uncertain manner. Gussie may have been one over the eight, but as far as the majority of those present were concerned he was sitting on top of the world. "Boys," said Gussie, "I mean ladies and gentlemen and boys, I do not detain you long, but I suppose on this occasion to feel compelled to say a few auspicious words; Ladies--and boys and gentlemen--we have all listened with interest to the remarks of our friend here who forgot to shave this morning--I don't know his name, but then he didn't know mine--Fitz-Wattle, I mean, absolutely absurd--which squares things up a bit--and we are all sorry that the Reverend What-ever-he-was-called should be dying of adenoids, but after all, here today, gone tomorrow, and all flesh is as grass, and what not, but that wasn't what I wanted to say. What I wanted to say was this--and I say it confidently--without fear of contradiction--I say, in short, I am happy to be here on this auspicious occasion and I take much pleasure in kindly awarding the prizes, consisting of the handsome books you see laid out on that table. As Shakespeare says, there are sermons in books, stones in the running brooks, or, rather, the other way about, and there you have it in a nutshell." It went well, and I wasn't surprised. I couldn't quite follow some of it, but anybody could see that it was real ripe stuff, and I was amazed that even the course of treatment he had been taking could have rendered so normally tongue-tied a dumb brick as Gussie capable of it. It just shows, what any member of Parliament will tell you, that if you want real oratory, the preliminary noggin is essential. Unless pie-eyed, you cannot hope to grip. "Gentlemen," said Gussie, "I mean ladies and gentlemen and, of course, boys, what a beautiful world this is. A beautiful world, full of happiness on every side. Let me tell you a little story. Two Irishmen, Pat and Mike, were walking along Broadway, and one said to the other, 'Begorrah, the race is not always to the swift,' and the other replied, 'Faith and begob, education is a drawing out, not a putting in.'" I must say it seemed to me the rottenest story I had ever heard, and I was surprised that Jeeves should have considered it worth while shoving into a speech. However, when I taxed him with this later, he said that Gussie had altered the plot a good deal, and I dare say that accounts for it. At any rate, that was the conte as Gussie told it, and when I say that it got a very fair laugh, you will understand what a popular favourite he had become with the multitude. There might be a bearded bloke or so on the platform and a small section in the second row who were wishing the speaker would conclude his remarks and resume his seat, but the audience as a whole was for him solidly. There was applause, and a voice cried: "Hear, hear!" "Yes," said Gussie, "it is a beautiful world. The sky is blue, the birds are singing, there is optimism everywhere. And why not, boys and ladies and gentlemen? I'm happy, you're happy, we're all happy, even the meanest Irishman that walks along Broadway. Though, as I say, there were two of them--Pat and Mike, one drawing out, the other putting in. I should like you boys, taking the time from me, to give three cheers for this beautiful world. All together now." Presently the dust settled down and the plaster stopped falling from the ceiling, and he went on... This is the funniest part from the funniest book I have ever read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Nielsen

    **WOOSTERS' GUIDE** (as opposed to boring old Webster's guide) *Woosters are men of tact, and have a nice sense of host obligations. *Even when displaying the iron hand, Woosters like to keep the thing fairly matey. *When woosters put their hand to the plough, they do not readily sheath the sword. *Woosters are fair minded, and make allowances for men parading through London all night in scarlet tights. (my favorite) *Woosters like to have their story ready. *A Woosters' word is his bond. *Woosters ar **WOOSTERS' GUIDE** (as opposed to boring old Webster's guide) *Woosters are men of tact, and have a nice sense of host obligations. *Even when displaying the iron hand, Woosters like to keep the thing fairly matey. *When woosters put their hand to the plough, they do not readily sheath the sword. *Woosters are fair minded, and make allowances for men parading through London all night in scarlet tights. (my favorite) *Woosters like to have their story ready. *A Woosters' word is his bond. *Woosters are quicker witted than the ordinary man and can read between the lines. *Woosters are ingenious, Jeeves, exceedingly ingenious. *Woosters are always at their shrewdest, and most level-headed in moments of peril. *Woosters are as quick as lightning. *It is unworthy of the prestige of a Wooster to squash in among the proletariat in a standing-room-only section. *Woosters have an uncanny knack for going straight to the heart of things. *A Wooster is seldom baffled, for more than the nonce. And last, but certainly not least, *Woosters can bite the bullet.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Apatt

    “This dashed difficult problem of where to begin it. It's a thing you don't want to go wrong over, because one false step and you're sunk. I mean, if you fool about too long at the start, trying to establish atmosphere, as they call it, and all that sort of rot, you fail to grip and the customers walk out on you.” Bertie Wooster, in spite of being a silly ass, has a way with words. His first person narrative is a joy to read, it does help that he has P.G. Wodehouse to write on his behalf. He is r “This dashed difficult problem of where to begin it. It's a thing you don't want to go wrong over, because one false step and you're sunk. I mean, if you fool about too long at the start, trying to establish atmosphere, as they call it, and all that sort of rot, you fail to grip and the customers walk out on you.” Bertie Wooster, in spite of being a silly ass, has a way with words. His first person narrative is a joy to read, it does help that he has P.G. Wodehouse to write on his behalf. He is right of course, the first paragraph of anything is often the hardest one to write. I am, in fact, in the soup at this very moment. (12 hours later) “I must admit that I found myself, at moment of going to press, a little destitute of constructive ideas.” Well, I’m dashed, I went to bed with only one paragraph done, I woke up to find still only one paragraph done! Where are those little elves chappies who are supposed to get things done for you when you are getting your eight hours shuteye? You know, making shoes, writing reviews and whatnot. What rot these stories are. I’d say I have a good mind to complain, except that I don’t actually have a good mind. Right Ho, Jeeves starts off comfortably enough with Bertie having tea in bed and chatting with super butler valet Jeeves about his newt loving friend, Gussie Fink-Nottle, suddenly he is notified in a telegram that “a V-shaped rumminess has manifested itself from the direction of Worcestershire”, at Brinkley Court, where his aunt Dahlia resides. It seems his cousin Angela Travers has broken her engagement with his pal Tuppy Glossop, and his aunt Dahlia is having trouble financing her magazine. The sort of rummy problems Jeeves can solve in a jiffy, except that Bertie is on the outs with Jeeves over a mess-jacket with brass buttons, so he resolves to sort out these difficulties himself. Much hilarity ensues, featuring Bertie getting himself engaged to a Manic Pixie Dream Girl, Brinkley Court’s French chef, Anatole shaking “a few fists” at Gussie clinging to a roof for dear life, fire alarms going off and many other lunatic incidents. Right Ho, Jeeves is a little unusual in that it is an actual novel rather than a collection of short stories like the other Jeeves books I have read. The subplots tie in together surprisingly well so the book does not feel overly episodic. Throughout the book, the well-meaning Bertie comes up with several wild schemes to alleviate his friends’ problems. Unfortunately, he cannot plan more than two steps ahead, and the second step is usually wrong. As with most Wodehouse’s books, there is no real substance to the plot, you read his books for the extraordinary language, hilarious dialogue, and lovable characters. Wodehouse does pull out a nice little twist at the end, though, with Jeeves applying his “psychology of the individual” to save the day. Wodehouse’s books are all “feel good” books that you pick up when you feel a little down; they will soon start to restore your brain tissues. They are also ideal if you need a change of pace from more serious fiction. I’ll be dashed if I can think of anything else to say. What I’ll do is, I’ll bung in some quotes instead to beef up the review. Tinkerty-tonk! The Jeeves & Wooster television series is extremely diverting, sir. If you have not had the pleasure, might I venture to suggest that you endeavour to acquire the DVD forthwith? Thank you, sir. _______________________ Notes: • Audiobook credit: Read with appropriate jolliness by smashing cove, Mark Nelson (American chap and accent, but spiffing fellow), whose enjoyment of the book is quite infectious. Bonus points for Anatole’s accented dialogue! Download from Librivox. • I am glad nobody has to steal anything and try to put it back this time, one of Wodehouse’s favorite plot devices. Quotes: "Eloquent? No, it's not eloquent. Elusive? No, it's not elusive. It's on the tip of my tongue. Begins with an 'e' and means being a jolly sight too clever." "Elaborate, sir?" “Jeeves doesn't have to open doors. He's like one of those birds in India who bung their astral bodies about—the chaps, I mean, who having gone into thin air in Bombay, reassemble the parts and appear two minutes later in Calcutta. Only some such theory will account for the fact that he's not there one moment and is there the next. He just seems to float from Spot A to Spot B like some form of gas.” “I consider that of all the dashed silly, drivelling ideas I ever heard in my puff this is the most blithering and futile.” “I read it backwards. I read it forwards. As a matter of fact, I have a sort of recollection of even smelling it. But it still baffled me.” “He was one of those timid, obsequious, teacup-passing, thin-bread-and-butter-offering yes-men ” “I wish there was something else you could call him except 'Uncle Tom'," said Aunt Dahlia a little testily. "Every time you do it, I expect to see him turn black and start playing the banjo.” “He barked raspingly, as if he were having trouble with the tonsils of the soul.” Gah! Too many great quotes to put in, just read the whole book why don’t you? Bung-oh!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Every line was perfection. I kept laughing out loud and looking for someone to read bits too, but alas, there was no one who appreciates this the way I do at hand. The real tragedy, though, is realizing that I will never have friends with awesome names like Tuppy Glossop, Pongo Twistleton, and Gussie Fink-Nottle!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This was a delight! Truth be told, Wodehouse saved me during a long and boring meeting yesterday. I was stuck in the auditorium for hours, but luckily I had "Right Ho, Jeeves," downloaded on iBooks. Soon I was smiling and trying not to giggle too loudly. In Right Ho, Bertie Wooster manages to bungle things severely with two different couples who are staying at his aunt's house, and even accidentally gets engaged to a silly girl who talks of fairies and stars: "I don't want to wrong anybody, so I This was a delight! Truth be told, Wodehouse saved me during a long and boring meeting yesterday. I was stuck in the auditorium for hours, but luckily I had "Right Ho, Jeeves," downloaded on iBooks. Soon I was smiling and trying not to giggle too loudly. In Right Ho, Bertie Wooster manages to bungle things severely with two different couples who are staying at his aunt's house, and even accidentally gets engaged to a silly girl who talks of fairies and stars: "I don't want to wrong anybody, so I won't go so far as to say that she actually wrote poetry, but her conversation, to my mind, was of a nature calculated to excite the liveliest suspicions. Well, I mean to say, when a girl suddenly asks you out of a blue sky if you don't sometimes feel that the stars are God's daisy-chain, you begin to think a bit." Bertie tries to sort things out between the couples, but his scheme of the lovelorn refusing their dinner ends up insulting his aunt's chef, who threatens to quit. Meanwhile, Bertie unintentionally gets his old friend roaring drunk just before he was to give a speech at a school assembly, which caused a scene of much hilarity, and then the drunkard gets engaged to someone else's betrothed. What a mess! Things are so bad that Aunt Dahlia tells Bertie he is like Attila the Hun. "I was trying to think who you reminded me of. Somebody who went about strewing ruin and desolation and breaking up homes which, until he came along, had been happy and peaceful ... To look at you, one would think you were just an ordinary sort of amiable idiot -- certifiable, perhaps, but quite harmless. Yet in reality, you are a worse scourge than the Black Death." Luckily, Jeeves is around to save the day. He concocts a ruse to get Bertie away from the house for several hours and is able to mend all fences. Right ho! I enjoyed this book so much I'm going to go through the entire Jeeves canon. I think I'll download them before my next meeting, just in case.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Frederick

    Those starting to read P. G. Wodehouse should start with this novel, which is sometimes called BRINKLEY MANOR. It is the immediate predecessor to Wodehouse's most perfect novel, THE CODE OF THE WOOSTERS. He wrote this in his mid-fifties. It was something like his fortieth novel. He literally wrote about seventy novels, all of them extremely light, the vast majority of them humorous. (His very early novels were about cricket-players at prep-school.) RIGHT-HO, JEEVES features P. G. Wodehouse's mos Those starting to read P. G. Wodehouse should start with this novel, which is sometimes called BRINKLEY MANOR. It is the immediate predecessor to Wodehouse's most perfect novel, THE CODE OF THE WOOSTERS. He wrote this in his mid-fifties. It was something like his fortieth novel. He literally wrote about seventy novels, all of them extremely light, the vast majority of them humorous. (His very early novels were about cricket-players at prep-school.) RIGHT-HO, JEEVES features P. G. Wodehouse's most famous characters, Bertie Wooster and his butler, Jeeves. The Jeeves novels are like Sunday comic strips come to life; early Sunday comic strips of the sort printed around 1915, where people at dinner parties knock over elaborately placed dinner tables. There is a great deal of slapstick in Wodehouse's novels. The great thing with the Jeeves novels is that they are narrated in the first-person by the very opinionated main character, Bertie. He's an eternally vacationing young aristocrat. His main fear is having to visit one of his intimidating and/or crazy aunts at one of their various mansions. Girls he has no interest in constantly assume he's trying to propose to them and almost all the Jeeves novels involve Bertie's efforts to wriggle out of engagements he himself never instigated. He also has a valiant side. He tries to fix up friends who do love particular girls with the girls of their choice. The plots sound much more like Evelyn Waugh than they actually are. The plots are simply devices for Bertie Wooster to tell us what he thinks of the people who seem always to impinge on his repose. Wodehouse's strong suit is his absolutely classical use of language as juxtaposed with his sharp sense of jazz-age slang. The slang he uses, of course, never partakes of anything sexual. Wodehouse is the least libidinous humorist in the English language. Above all, you don't get a sense that a bully ever wins in Wodehouse. Everything comes right at the end. That's the definition of comedy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    LydiaMae

    “Jeeves, I'm engaged." "I hope you will be very happy, sir." "Don't be an ass. I'm engaged to Miss Bassett.” 2018 was missing something, and now I know what. Nothing can make me laugh quite like Wodehouse's Jeeves series. Read with a LibriVox audiobook.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Another adventure with Jeeves,the butler, and his employer Bertram (Bertie) Wooster,the master.But who is really in charge? And for that matter the smartest? It's very apparent from the beginning and the butler did it.But this isn't a murder mystery.And no one dies here ,just their dignity, are sacrificed.When Bertie comes back to his London place, from Cannes,France,after a vacation of two months(his whole life is a vacation).His Aunt Dahlia insists he come to her country house,Brinkley Court, Another adventure with Jeeves,the butler, and his employer Bertram (Bertie) Wooster,the master.But who is really in charge? And for that matter the smartest? It's very apparent from the beginning and the butler did it.But this isn't a murder mystery.And no one dies here ,just their dignity, are sacrificed.When Bertie comes back to his London place, from Cannes,France,after a vacation of two months(his whole life is a vacation).His Aunt Dahlia insists he come to her country house,Brinkley Court, immediately.Strange since his aunt and her daughter Angela, had spent their vacation with him.Jeeves who had stayed in England, also informs Bertie, that his old university friend,Augustus(Gussie) Fink-Nottle,(Wodehouse makes up the greatest names)wants to see him.Weird since Gussie hates London and spends his time studying newts,(salamanders) at his country estate.A man needs to keep busy.You guessed it,a girl is involved.Madeline Bassett, a woman that Wooster met at Cannes.But when Fink-Nottle arrives, he doesn't need to see his friend but Jeeves instead.Word has gotten around that the butler, can solve any romantic difficulties.So Bertie invites Gussie, to go to his aunt's house,Madeline is a guest there.By the way, the reason Wooster's aunt asked him to come. Is that she wants him to give some presents, in the local grammar school, to the small children.Bertie is terrified,the man also has to give a little speech, in front of the whole village.Disaster follows disaster, as Wooster without any help from Jeeves.Bertie insists on that, when he tries himself ,to bring together two couples and get them to the altar.The shy Fink-Nottle and Madeline, his cousin Angela, and her estranged boyfriend, Tuppy Glossop. Both duos become engaged and unengaged, even Bertie somehow gets roped in! Jeeves, please help them!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    So off we go to Brinkley Court for more high japes and adventures. Along the way hearts will be sundered, friendships forged in childhood will be momentarily broken and mentally negligible young men will make complete fools out of themselves. If you’re already aware of the books but can’t quite determine which one this is (after all, they do share very similar plots), then this is the episode with Gussie Fink-Nottle dressed as the devil and Bertie making an eighteen mile round trip on an old bic So off we go to Brinkley Court for more high japes and adventures. Along the way hearts will be sundered, friendships forged in childhood will be momentarily broken and mentally negligible young men will make complete fools out of themselves. If you’re already aware of the books but can’t quite determine which one this is (after all, they do share very similar plots), then this is the episode with Gussie Fink-Nottle dressed as the devil and Bertie making an eighteen mile round trip on an old bicycle to rescue a key which was in Jeeves’s pocket all along. The interesting thing with these stories is how Wodehouse gets around the Superman problem. Of course the main flaw with any Superman story is that he is so much more powerful than anyone else; so invulnerable to attack, that every villain on the planet has to get access to kryptonite to make a dent on him. (Now, one would think that was a rare substance, but no, it seems to be as freely available to the criminal classes as lock-picks.) Wodehouse faces a same issue. Given how smart and assured Jeeves is, given that the man never makes a mistake – how does one eke out a novel worth of material with a central protagonist who can just step in and save the day in an instant? Well the answer is of course young Bertie Wooster. By creating tension between the young master and his valet, by letting Bertie get the idea that Jeeves has somehow lost it, we are treated to over two hundred pages of hilarious thrills and spills as Wooster’s advice causes calamity and disaster at every turn. (It would be like a missing Conan Doyle novel, where Watson tells Holmes he’s gone off his chump and starts to investigate the murders himself). Of course Jeeves will inevitably step in and save everything at the end, but even when all is resolved it’s clearly just at pause until the next set of incredible and hilarious confusions begins. Comic writing at its absolute best. The Master strikes again.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Quinn

    Five stars aren't enough for a book that contains Gussie Fink-Nottle's speech at the Market Snodsbury Grammar School. Any writer who ventures into comedy should read some Wodehouse.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chiara

    È così... inglese!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kedar

    "Stimulated by the juice, I believe, men have even been known to ride alligators." With lines like these, it is definitely not difficult to love a Wodehouse book. Right Ho, Jeeves sits right there amongst the best of Wodehouse that includes almost all of his books. :) Right Ho, Jeeves goes on to narrate a story about the suggestively piscine Gussie Fink-Nottle (or as Aunt Dahlia prefers to call him eventually Spink-Bottle, and you will know why!) and his problematic betrothal to Madeline Bassett a "Stimulated by the juice, I believe, men have even been known to ride alligators." With lines like these, it is definitely not difficult to love a Wodehouse book. Right Ho, Jeeves sits right there amongst the best of Wodehouse that includes almost all of his books. :) Right Ho, Jeeves goes on to narrate a story about the suggestively piscine Gussie Fink-Nottle (or as Aunt Dahlia prefers to call him eventually Spink-Bottle, and you will know why!) and his problematic betrothal to Madeline Bassett and along with that a story about the lover's rift between Hildebrand AKA Tuppy Glossop and Cousin Angela. Thrown in are some sub-plots about Aunt Dahlia and her gambling issues, the sensitive cook Anatole (god's gift to gastric juices), the paranoid Uncle Tom, and the overall happenings at Brinkley Manor. Who takes charge of solving all of these cases? No, not Jeeves, it's Bertram Wilberforce Wooster! (For an insight into the Woosters, do take a gander at the Wooster Guide: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/....) Bertie believes that Jeeves is unable to pull swift ones as before and decides to take over the reign. So, then the Unstoppable farce meets the Immovable object: Unstoppable farce: "You see now how right I was." Immovable object: "Yes, sir." U.f: "It must have been rather an eye-opener for you, watching me handle this case." I.o:"Yes, sir." U.f:"The simple, direct method never fails." I.o:"No, sir." U.f:"Whereas the elaborate does." I.o:"Yes, sir." U.f:"Right ho, Jeeves." When the farce, better known as Bertie, is aggressively convinced that the supreme spin-doctor, problem-solver Jeeves is not in his right elements, and decides to take control of the thoughtful steering wheel, all falls down. Or at least some of them do. Wodehouse, in his own inimitable style, then goes on to describe the fun and at times laugh-out-loud events that happen and things tumble down, and eventually rise up. It's fun to read his descriptions about a certain fishy chap who become highly inebriated and delivers a superb speech! Eventually, Bertie has to shake off his illusion about the not-in-form Jeeves after he sees how everything is solved by the trustworthy chap. Jeeves actions thoroughly convince us about the aberration that the Wooster spirit is. As Sheldon Cooper would say, there seems to be too much chlorine in the Wooster gene pool! Oh and not to mention about the white mess jacket! All it took was a hot instrument...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Oh, Bertie. Oh, Tuppy. And oh, oh, Gussie. An engagement to the more delicately nurtured of the species can go a bit rummy under certain circs. Not to mention prize-giving at that bally Market Snodsbury Grammar School. Bertie does his best to save the day, based on his knowing "the psychology of the individual", but as usual his schemes only serve to make chaps go to fires from frying pans. Thank goodness for Jeeves!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    One of the (many) fine Jeeves and Wooster novels from between the two WWs. Certainly takes one away from the newspaper headlines. Numerous chuckles, occasional guffaws. Right ho, indeed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shubho

    Unparalleled. Best of Wodehouse. I have probably read this book 5 times now and enjoyed every read more than the prior.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Hallinan

    P.G. Wodehouse is the absolute master of first-person narrative. Bertie's voice in the Jeeves books is one of the greatest achievements in all of comic fiction--absolutely consistent, totally confident, unerringly wrong. Jeeves is the title character, and certainly the greatest butler in literary history, but Bertie is nonpareil. And it's no wonder that the Jeeves books haven't really worked in dramatic form (and I include the very good BBC series with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry) -- without Ber P.G. Wodehouse is the absolute master of first-person narrative. Bertie's voice in the Jeeves books is one of the greatest achievements in all of comic fiction--absolutely consistent, totally confident, unerringly wrong. Jeeves is the title character, and certainly the greatest butler in literary history, but Bertie is nonpareil. And it's no wonder that the Jeeves books haven't really worked in dramatic form (and I include the very good BBC series with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry) -- without Bertie's narrative, what you've got is somewhat mechanical drawing-room comedy with plot reversals that wouldn't look out of place in a sitcom. As an example, one of the highlights of this book, Bertie's account of an eighteen-mile bicycle ride, in the dark, to fetch a key no one actually needs, would be, on film, a man on a bike in the dark, whereas in Bertie's telling it takes on almost Homeric proportions. I don't mean to knock Wodehouse in any way. He creates marvelous characters -- in this book, we have Aunt Dahlia and one of the dampest females in fiction, Madeleine Bassett, who believes the stars are God's daisy chain except when she believes that every time a fairy cries a new star appears. Even Bertie registers the inconsistency. Madeleine's dialogue is Wodehouse in top form, as is the prize presentation at a local elementary school in which Gussie Fink-Nottle, drunk for the first time in his life, makes the keynote speech. The plot springs primarily from Bertie's conviction that Jeeves has sprained his brain and he, Bertie, had better step in and take charge of fixing all that's wrong in his immediate world. And, of course, chaos results and Jeeves eventually has to step in. It's so much better than it sounds that I almost cut this paragraph. The magic is what Wodehouse makes from this material, filtered through Bertie's skewed and somewhat filmy perspective. I laughed out loud more or less continuously. There's no one, unfortunately, like P.G. Wodehouse.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben Rutter

    I saw that it would be fruitless to try to reason with her. Quite plainly, she was not in the vein. Contenting myself, accordingly, with a gesture of loving sympathy, I left the room. Whether she did or did not throw a handsomely bound volume of the Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, at me, I am not in a position to say. I had seen it lying on the table beside her, and as I closed the door I remember receiving the impression that some blunt instrument had crashed against the woodwork, but I was fee I saw that it would be fruitless to try to reason with her. Quite plainly, she was not in the vein. Contenting myself, accordingly, with a gesture of loving sympathy, I left the room. Whether she did or did not throw a handsomely bound volume of the Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, at me, I am not in a position to say. I had seen it lying on the table beside her, and as I closed the door I remember receiving the impression that some blunt instrument had crashed against the woodwork, but I was feeling too preoccupied to note and observe.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vimal Thiagarajan

    The rummy thing about life is that though you feel exhilarated that you've read a wonderful book, you begin to get the wind up your pipe wondering why the dickens you hadn't read anything from this author-chappie ever before

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    4 1/2 stars (extra 1/2 star for the narration!) Once again, Jonathan Cecil gives a marvelous reading of Bertie and friends. July 2018 relisten -- no change to the above :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mela

    "Don't do it, Bertie! Don't try to outsmart Jeeves!" - those were words I had on my mouth reading this part of their adventures. Again, I have had a great time. There was no way to not giggling/laughing. P.G. Wodehouse was a genial comedian, without a doubt. And Jonathan Cecil was a brilliant narrator, undeniably perfect to the role. Will I have enough of Jeeves' series someday? I can't imagine.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Temuka Zoidze

    აქამდე სად ვიყავი, ჯივზ?!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tania

    Great stuff. As some clever cove (probably Shakespeare) once said, "Mr Wodehouse's idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in" I couldn't have put it better myself. *The quote is actually Evelyn Waugh*

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Jeeves, hand me my Thesaurus! This is going to require more than a few superlatives for me to even come close to accurately describing just how brilliant this book is. This is, quite possibly, the funniest book I have ever read and most likely will ever read, what? The humour is astoundingly advanced for its time, and effortlessly eclipses most of the 'comedies' I’ve unwittingly subjected myself to over recent years - television included. P.G. Wodehouse has such consistently amazing prose, where Jeeves, hand me my Thesaurus! This is going to require more than a few superlatives for me to even come close to accurately describing just how brilliant this book is. This is, quite possibly, the funniest book I have ever read and most likely will ever read, what? The humour is astoundingly advanced for its time, and effortlessly eclipses most of the 'comedies' I’ve unwittingly subjected myself to over recent years - television included. P.G. Wodehouse has such consistently amazing prose, where every word is so perfectly considered, I actually find myself experiencing severe pangs of jealousy. Add to this the well worked plot and its numerous twists, the running jokes throughout, the unwavering, modest brilliance of Jeeves (in stark contrast to his employer, Bertie Wooster) and you have the ingredients for five stars from me! Read. This. Book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Manab

    এ কী একখান বই কিনলাম, সারা শরীর অকষত, খালি পরথম পাতা নাই। কিছু একটা যে নাই, সেটাও আমি বুঝি নাই পরথমে, বিশ পাতা পরে গিয়ে বুঝেছি। তামাম মুলূকের সবাই জানেন, উডহাউজ হাসাইতে পারে, পদে পদে, পদানুকরমে। সে কী এক-একখান বাকযি। এই পাতা ছেড়ে ঐ পাতা উদধৃত করে কার সাধয! আমার বযকতিগতভাবে বলযানডিংসের কাহিনীগুলি বেশি ভাললাগে। সে যাই হোক, চরিতরের দোষে উসটার আর জীভসই সেরা! এই বইয়ে এক জযাকেট আর ফিঙক-বোটল নিয়ে যা দেখাইলো তারা। অপরাপর উডহাউজের মতই, এখানেও পরেম ভেসতে যায়। ভাসতুক, কিনতু আজতক কাহিনীর সবলপতাহেতু ইনি কারুকে এ কী একখান বই কিনলাম, সারা শরীর অক্ষত, খালি প্রথম পাতা নাই। কিছু একটা যে নাই, সেটাও আমি বুঝি নাই প্রথমে, বিশ পাতা পরে গিয়ে বুঝেছি। তামাম মুলূকের সবাই জানেন, উডহাউজ হাসাইতে পারে, পদে পদে, পদানুক্রমে। সে কী এক-একখান বাক্যি। এই পাতা ছেড়ে ঐ পাতা উদ্ধৃত করে কার সাধ্য! আমার ব্যক্তিগতভাবে ব্ল্যান্ডিংসের কাহিনীগুলি বেশি ভাল্লাগে। সে যাই হোক, চরিত্রের দোষে উস্টার আর জীভসই সেরা! এই বইয়ে এক জ্যাকেট আর ফিঙ্ক-বোটল নিয়ে যা দেখাইলো তারা। অপরাপর উডহাউজের মতই, এখানেও প্রেম ভেস্তে যায়। ভাস্তুক, কিন্তু আজতক কাহিনীর স্বল্পতাহেতু ইনি কারুকে হাই তোলান নাই। কারণ কাহিনী ত এখানে সারসংক্ষেপে না, কাহিনী ছোটো ছোটো ডিটেলে। ছয়টা উপন্যাস শেষ, আর মাত্র পঁয়ষট্টিটা বাকী। দেখি, হাতে আরো কিছু টাকা হলে রাস্তায় ঘুরে ঘুরে আর কয়টা পেয়ে যাই।

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I have read the "Jeeves stories" over and over having discovered them the first time years ago when i was home do to a broken foot I'd gotten on my job and had to be down a bit. While I almost always feel obligated to warn perspective readers that you might run across some words or phrases in a very few of these stories that are today found offensive (as you will if you read Mark Twain) please remember that they weren't meant that way. The stories are a product of their time and if you can get p I have read the "Jeeves stories" over and over having discovered them the first time years ago when i was home do to a broken foot I'd gotten on my job and had to be down a bit. While I almost always feel obligated to warn perspective readers that you might run across some words or phrases in a very few of these stories that are today found offensive (as you will if you read Mark Twain) please remember that they weren't meant that way. The stories are a product of their time and if you can get passed that (and it's not something you'll see except in a couple of stories) you'll find some very creative and funny writing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Josephine Myles

    I can't believe it's taken me so long to get around to reading any P.G. Wodehouse. Clearly I've been missing out. One of the funniest books I've read in a long time. Bertie Wooster's narrative voice is hysterical! Just marvellous. I'm out to hunt down more!

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