kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

DC Comics Essentials: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, #1

Availability: Ready to download

This is first chapter from Frank Miller's graphic novel masterpiece, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS. It remains an undisputed classic, one of the most influential stories ever told in comics, and is a book cited by the filmmakers as an inspiration for the most recent Batman movies. BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS is one of the titles featured in the DC ENTERTAINMENT ESSEN This is first chapter from Frank Miller's graphic novel masterpiece, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS. It remains an undisputed classic, one of the most influential stories ever told in comics, and is a book cited by the filmmakers as an inspiration for the most recent Batman movies. BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS is one of the titles featured in the DC ENTERTAINMENT ESSENTIAL GRAPHIC NOVELS AND CHRONOLOGY 2014 catalog. Inside is an expansive look at our rich backlist collection created by the best writers and illustrators in the industry. This catalog can be used as an important resource for new fans seeking a starting point, as well as look back at our impressive backlist for the most fervent DCE enthusiasts.


Compare
kode adsense disini

This is first chapter from Frank Miller's graphic novel masterpiece, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS. It remains an undisputed classic, one of the most influential stories ever told in comics, and is a book cited by the filmmakers as an inspiration for the most recent Batman movies. BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS is one of the titles featured in the DC ENTERTAINMENT ESSEN This is first chapter from Frank Miller's graphic novel masterpiece, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS. It remains an undisputed classic, one of the most influential stories ever told in comics, and is a book cited by the filmmakers as an inspiration for the most recent Batman movies. BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS is one of the titles featured in the DC ENTERTAINMENT ESSENTIAL GRAPHIC NOVELS AND CHRONOLOGY 2014 catalog. Inside is an expansive look at our rich backlist collection created by the best writers and illustrators in the industry. This catalog can be used as an important resource for new fans seeking a starting point, as well as look back at our impressive backlist for the most fervent DCE enthusiasts.

30 review for DC Comics Essentials: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, #1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    Solid batman outing. Old school artwork but great story from Miller. Seems to have aslightly different style to the more recent novels.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    I've read this countless times in the trade paperback that but this is the first time I've read it as an individual comic book, and on digital. Wildstorm did a great job remastering this issue. What is there more to say? This is the first part of Frank Miller's seminal miniseries on Batman. He aged Bruce Wayne to the edge of crankiness, removing it as far from the smiling corporate pitchman he had become and returning him to his roots as a dark knight. I love reading it on digital, a new experienc I've read this countless times in the trade paperback that but this is the first time I've read it as an individual comic book, and on digital. Wildstorm did a great job remastering this issue. What is there more to say? This is the first part of Frank Miller's seminal miniseries on Batman. He aged Bruce Wayne to the edge of crankiness, removing it as far from the smiling corporate pitchman he had become and returning him to his roots as a dark knight. I love reading it on digital, a new experience to say the least. I could easily zoom in on the panels and enjoy Lynn Varley's lush coloring. This is one of the two best Batman stories ever. The other one is also written by Miller. A must read for any fan of the comic book medium.

  3. 4 out of 5

    José

    Old Bats still can kick some ass. It was awesome!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Heath

    Wow. That was much deeper than I was expecting. "I see a reflection." It's interesting that Batman's villains are almost always similar to himself. It's also interesting to see how much this hurts him. I wonder if that's why he's so reluctant to kill...? He thinks that saving them can save his own soul? Hm. I feel a blog post coming on. =)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Saleem Khan

    I originally rated this 5 stars. Now, it's a 1. I first read it as the original series of prestige-format comic books, and thought it was a brilliant satire commenting on society in the late 1980s. What has changed is my understanding of Frank Miller's intent. In blog posts (now deleted) and interviews 20+ years after first publication, Miller revealed himself to be a bigoted neo-fascist. This made one thing clear: The world and attitudes he depicts in the Dark Knight Returns are not a satire or a I originally rated this 5 stars. Now, it's a 1. I first read it as the original series of prestige-format comic books, and thought it was a brilliant satire commenting on society in the late 1980s. What has changed is my understanding of Frank Miller's intent. In blog posts (now deleted) and interviews 20+ years after first publication, Miller revealed himself to be a bigoted neo-fascist. This made one thing clear: The world and attitudes he depicts in the Dark Knight Returns are not a satire or a cautionary tale at all. It is his prescription for how to solve what he sees as the world's problems. And that changes The Dark Knight from a being a brilliant work of art into being a puerile but terrifying adolescent male power fantasy. No thanks.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    I just recently purchased the hardcover collectors edition of The Dark Knight Returns which collects each issue as a separate hardcover book all in a really nice box set. I think this was the comic that sort of started my Batman obsession. The first issue of the Dark Knight Returns is a personal story about an aging Bruce Wayne and him trying to move on from being Batman after retiring ten years earlier due to the death of Jason Todd. Frank Millers artwork is definitely dated, and could be deeme I just recently purchased the hardcover collectors edition of The Dark Knight Returns which collects each issue as a separate hardcover book all in a really nice box set. I think this was the comic that sort of started my Batman obsession. The first issue of the Dark Knight Returns is a personal story about an aging Bruce Wayne and him trying to move on from being Batman after retiring ten years earlier due to the death of Jason Todd. Frank Millers artwork is definitely dated, and could be deemed ugly by today’s standards but for the time it was groundbreaking. The real reason The Dark Knight Returns remains such a classic though is because of the writing. Frank Miller has very organic and realistic dialogue, and some of the real highlights are in this first issue with Bruce Wayne’s monologues. Miller also reminds us that Gotham is in fact a city, with news reporters, politicians, and people for and against the idea of vigilantism. Much of this book is from the viewpoint of Gotham’s citizens, and is thus made a very intriguing sociopolitical satire.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    So many aspects of the movies and other Batman comics I have read make much more sense now after reading this. The fact that this is 30 years old is astonishing, it still feels so fresh. The story is great, the asides told through television interviews and bulletins are genius, and the illustrations are out of this world. The comic picks up with the mutants causing more and more trouble in Gotham, Batman has been in retirement for a decade but feels he must put on his cape and save Gotham from i So many aspects of the movies and other Batman comics I have read make much more sense now after reading this. The fact that this is 30 years old is astonishing, it still feels so fresh. The story is great, the asides told through television interviews and bulletins are genius, and the illustrations are out of this world. The comic picks up with the mutants causing more and more trouble in Gotham, Batman has been in retirement for a decade but feels he must put on his cape and save Gotham from itself. Understandably not everyone is happy to see him back and many are quick to lay Gotham's problems at Batman's feet. He has to battle evil, save face, and try to stay healthy and fit (which is hard because he's legit old now). Throw in the fact that Harvey Dent is let out (they fixed his face, no more two sided evil nature!) and there are rumors that the Joker is sane enough to do interviews on television, and that a young girl has started tagging along as Robin and you've got one hell of a great graphic novel. Solid from start to finish.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Moataz Ibrahim

    Batman comes back after 10 years to fight a gang that calls itself The Mutants. That might be a good way to describe the start of this quadrology. But I think it'd be more honest to say that he came back because he needed to. Batman came back because the society forgot and surrendered to its demise, and he needed to remind them one more time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Really cool but the thing about buying comics in series is that they aren't satisfying until you've read the whole story arc........

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    Holy Moly– YES. As someone who thoroughly disliked Man of Steel and didn't finish the Dark Knight movie, I have to say that this graphic novel series was surprisingly fantastic and showed me something about DC that the movies just didn't communicate to me. First of all, this was my first graphic novel, so I may just be reeling from this new style I've been exposed to. But I cannot deny how much the style, art, and story absorbed me from the very beginning. For people like me who have never read a g Holy Moly– YES. As someone who thoroughly disliked Man of Steel and didn't finish the Dark Knight movie, I have to say that this graphic novel series was surprisingly fantastic and showed me something about DC that the movies just didn't communicate to me. First of all, this was my first graphic novel, so I may just be reeling from this new style I've been exposed to. But I cannot deny how much the style, art, and story absorbed me from the very beginning. For people like me who have never read a graphic novel or superhero comic before, I'll lay out the main things about this read that surprised me that I liked: 1) The style was like watching a really old cartoon– in each panel, you can tell that there is almost a shocking amount of thought going into the components and layout of each panel. It's more poignant than a movie because every single panel/frame tells a miniature story of it's own. I didn't know that the position and dialogue of the characters mattered so much– I'm used to funny comics, so I didn't consider the careful design of the story through the panels in Dark Knight Returns. It was super cool because it was like a game where the goal is to find all the information/symbolism in a picture (speech bubbles, posters in the background, color, lighting, etc). It was like a powerful storyboard to a movie– I could almost hear a soundtrack! 2) Satisfying characters. Although the backstories of the characters are not fleshed out as much as in a book or movie, the character art, dialogue, and storyline is so masterfully designed/plotted out that it makes up for the lack of words (as in a book) or screentime (as in a movie). I particularly thought the speech choices for Clark Kent and Commissioner Gordon said a lot about their characters in a way that was to the point and almost better than reading a book or watching a movie. I hate every DC movie I've seen (with the exception of Wonder Woman :)), and this book does a much better job of handling the characters than the movies, in my opinion. I've always been uncomfortable with Batman because I didn't understand his motivation or how we were supposed to think of him– but, reading this, I get now that he's troubled and you're supposed to go-"heyyy...maybe, wait....are you...?" etc, every once in a while. From the movies, I got that he had issues, but I wasn't sure whether I was supposed to forgive them or not. This Batman made a lot more sense to me. I also really liked...Yindel? Is that her name? The art style made each character sharp and unique, which I loved. I loved the art for Yindel and Robin! 3) Variety. It wasn't just one type of panel. I really liked how some panels had rounded edges to show that we were watching TV, and how other panels were huge for cityscapes or falling-off-building shots... the art wasn't just good and perfect for the story– it was also creative and varied in its design, and that went for the speech bubbles as well– I was surprised that I could easily figure out if a character was thinking, talking, on TV, in a recording, etc. Certain styles were used when people were talking in different ways, which I suspect is common in graphic novels, but I had never considered it before, and I liked that that was an aspect of this type of book. The fact that the panel styles changed strategically, modeling quick movie scenes and with interested transitions/cut-off points between each– that was neat. Also, the repetition of different styles of panels (like with the TV broadcasts) made the story more impactful and exciting. 4) For people who don't like dark or intense stuff– hey, there's violence but it isn't that bad! I'm not even kidding! There's bright red blood and punching and people planning how to destroy each other and these creepy mutant guys that maybe want to eat people? I didn't really understand them besides the fact they were mean and had crazy teeth... point is, I was expected huge, distasteful amounts of blood and gore and guns and explosions– but, like the panels, the conflicts were varied, and it wasn't a giant punch-fest! There was more psychological stuff going on, really. And there was hardly any swearing (which I wasn't worried about but was expecting). A huge part of the reason I hate most DC movies I've seen is how dark they are– not scary, but just the whole hopeless ambience really gets me down, and the knowledge that people are making the Joker as awful as possible just to freak you out and make you doubt yourself– that gets under my skin. But the Joker here was actually a really interesting character who didn't make me uncomfortable– you got a sense of...if not his depth, than of the depth and uniqueness of his evil. I thought Batman v. Superman was just "pretty good" until the end– but I really, really liked Dark Knight Returns 4. I may even call it epic– iconic, of course! And I'm saying this as someone who knows of comic superheroes only what I've heard from A) my nerd friends B) pop culture and C) Big Bang Theory. Complaints? Couldn't stand the bold/italicizing of every third word. Made for some interesting dialogue, but it was mainly distracting. In general, a surprisingly good read in a style I found awesome– with less violence and more variation in design than I expected! I recommend it to teens– I don't think tweens would understand some political themes and darker ideas presented in the book... and you want the readers to understand. It makes a bigger impact that way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dayton Johnson

    GIVE ME THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    not many words required: Wauw, Miller brings it out good! I'm a fan, and I'm on to the next one!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Scott

    Late to the party, but the party is still going.... I can see the inspiration behind The Dark Knight movie series here, but there is also so much more. Wry, witty social commentary. A gritty lens worth descending into. And like all good books/graphic novels/etc. perhaps you will emerge with a new perspective. Cutting edge at its time, and still commenting on society today.

  14. 4 out of 5

    SJ Loria

    First. Why Graphic Novels are Valid Literature. Next, Quick Book Review. 1. “So, like, you’re reading comic books now?” I can feel the disgust, the OMG really, the assumption that this genre is childish. Not serious. Not academic. Low art, if one can call it art, assume the ones who do not read much. I can’t say I blame them. I held the same attitude for years before, for whatever the reason, I opened up and tried it. Graphic novels are interesting because they are more collaborative than most forms First. Why Graphic Novels are Valid Literature. Next, Quick Book Review. 1. “So, like, you’re reading comic books now?” I can feel the disgust, the OMG really, the assumption that this genre is childish. Not serious. Not academic. Low art, if one can call it art, assume the ones who do not read much. I can’t say I blame them. I held the same attitude for years before, for whatever the reason, I opened up and tried it. Graphic novels are interesting because they are more collaborative than most forms of literature. One person writes the script and either one person draws or, in this case, one person draws and another colors. So you have a collective creative process. The combination of narrative and art draws you in. It’s actually interesting to use the different frames to tease out meaning. It reminds me of EE Cummings, a poet who really understood that the shape of the words on the page can help contribute to the meaning of what is being said. Graphic novels have that in abundance. 2. This novel touches on serious topics. Eternal questions. In this case, what do you do when you still have a calling but your body is failing? How does it feel as the sun goes down? What’s the ethics of vigilantism? What’s the human experience like - the search for meaning and love - during times of destruction and nihilism? Is it better to answer to public opinion, existing laws (even if incomplete), or your inner voice? Batman, of course, answers to the ladder, but then again so does the Joker. The eternal questions are never black and white. If they can be explored through literature, whether paragraph format or graphic novel, I’m all in. As Dylan would say, let the Chinese build your phones. And let the “ugh, graphic novel?” people play on their apps. We’ll continue to read. Quote (not listening tons of quotes, since one I don’t quite want to spoil the plot and two most of the quotes / effect are the result of the visual presentation). You’ll never get to read this letter. It’ll burn up with me when our orbit deteriorates. Still, my last thoughts will be a prayer for you, for humanity, for planet Earth.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Simon Billinton

    It's an unsettling feeling when you read something revered as a classic and just don't connect with it. You wonder if you just haven't understood it properly. You doubt your self. Then I realised nah...it's just not written that well. The general story idea is very good, but it's written in a snapshot way that isn't just a function of the medium. Feels like the draft storyboard version, rather than the finished whole. I read Batman Year One straight afterward and that was significantly better, w It's an unsettling feeling when you read something revered as a classic and just don't connect with it. You wonder if you just haven't understood it properly. You doubt your self. Then I realised nah...it's just not written that well. The general story idea is very good, but it's written in a snapshot way that isn't just a function of the medium. Feels like the draft storyboard version, rather than the finished whole. I read Batman Year One straight afterward and that was significantly better, with a clean storytelling rhythm.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Set in the not so far off future, Batman having been retired for some years, certain circumstances arise in which Bruce Wayne feels the need for the Dark Knight to rise again. Absolutely beautiful artwork from page to page and Miller (as per usual)shows his peers a thing or two about storytelling and impact. The scenes with the Joker show him at his murderous best and THAT iconic moment where Batman finally snaps (no pun intended) will be forever etched into my mind. Take a bow, mssrs.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bullet Train

    Didn't like the overuse of news station comic panels . Seems like a rather lazy way of providing exposition . Overall I understand the significance of this graphic novel but I don't not feel like it stands the test of time . Millers use of dialogue can occasionally be hard to follow and the pacing just seem awkward to me personally .

  18. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    I actually read this pretty close to when it first came out, when I was working far too close to Forbidden Planet and someone recommended it to me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I've never really gotten into graphic novels but thought I'd give it a shot. It was a great story, but the shock of a "dark" batman was nonexistent for me, since I grew up with Keaton and Conroy, who are about as dark as they get. The art is gritty and chunky, and it makes Batman and Superman feel really feel god-like. It's also nice to see all these old characters trying to achieve a kind of catharsis after years of the same grinding, never-ending cycles of violence. The novel also does a great I've never really gotten into graphic novels but thought I'd give it a shot. It was a great story, but the shock of a "dark" batman was nonexistent for me, since I grew up with Keaton and Conroy, who are about as dark as they get. The art is gritty and chunky, and it makes Batman and Superman feel really feel god-like. It's also nice to see all these old characters trying to achieve a kind of catharsis after years of the same grinding, never-ending cycles of violence. The novel also does a great job of cutting to people on the street, newscasters, politicians, etc, to give the reader a good feel for the crumbling city. My only beef comes from this boneheaded idea that Batman can compete against Superman. He's Superman! He flew around the world so fast he moved time backwards! I know it's cool to pit the two biggest stars in your universe against one another, but it's just not believable to me. If Superman really wanted to kill Batman, it would be over in a nanosecond. I'm sorry, that just needs to be said.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Criss Vo

    When Zack Snyder called Ben Affleck to play Batman, even Affleck was like, "No way. I can't be Batman," but Snyder explained that he would play a messed-up Batman, one who is rugged and not afraid to kill - the same one we saw Affleck displayed in Batman v. Superman, and I believe that Batfleck did an amazing job! This is the exact Batman Snyder was referring to. Frank Miller's Batman is one to remember!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    The story definitely picks up speed and gets really good about half way through. Batman has been away for 10 years but Bruce Wayne couldnt keep his demon down! I am not used to seeing Batman with a gun but that has a twist I wont reveal. It was also good to see Harvey Two Face and it was interesting to see Batman's inner feelings toward his nemesis. As for the art, there were a couple of panels with some noticeable scale problems.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ali Ahsan

    It continues to amaze me as to how you have this incredible story written by Frank Miller and yet, you get movies such as Batman v Superman where they try to mesh multiple stories together. The Dark Knight Returns is a phenomenal story of a hero who's real identity lies in the costume he wears, an identity he cannot escape.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric Brown

    Frank Miller's retelling of the Batman origin that rebooted the character and paved the way for many of the movies currently rolling out from DC. The art was trend setting as well building off Miller's success with Ronin.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Angelica

    A deeper and darker knight returns "You cannot escape me..." Faces a new enemy gang but not just them, even the past still haunts Bruce Wayne/Batman. Hanging the cape and gloves wasn't enough, it stills call him, especially that Gotham is falling apart.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave McAlister

    I first read this as it was published in the '80s and loved it. Recently bought the combined graphic novel and read it again. While it's still good, it doesn't have the same power as when I first read it, I think because it's so much of a satire of the '80s that hasn't aged well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Param

    The best of the best. Arguable the best Batman story ever written, this Frank Miller masterpiece has everything that a Batman fan can ask for in a Batman novel. just pick it up, already!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ava

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nakia

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anna Limarenko

    Awesome classic Batman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.