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An Old Fashioned Girl (eBook)

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Louisa May Alcott was a 19th century American novelist. Her novels Little Women and Jo's Boys are her best-known works. Alcott became a strong feminist and abolitionist. In 1862-63 she worked as a nurse in the Union Hospital in Georgetown D C. I n An Old-Fashioned Girl Polly, a sensibly brought-up country girl, encounters fashionable life on her first visit to Boston. Late Louisa May Alcott was a 19th century American novelist. Her novels Little Women and Jo's Boys are her best-known works. Alcott became a strong feminist and abolitionist. In 1862-63 she worked as a nurse in the Union Hospital in Georgetown D C. I n An Old-Fashioned Girl Polly, a sensibly brought-up country girl, encounters fashionable life on her first visit to Boston. Later she returns to live there and teach music. For grades 5-8.


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Louisa May Alcott was a 19th century American novelist. Her novels Little Women and Jo's Boys are her best-known works. Alcott became a strong feminist and abolitionist. In 1862-63 she worked as a nurse in the Union Hospital in Georgetown D C. I n An Old-Fashioned Girl Polly, a sensibly brought-up country girl, encounters fashionable life on her first visit to Boston. Late Louisa May Alcott was a 19th century American novelist. Her novels Little Women and Jo's Boys are her best-known works. Alcott became a strong feminist and abolitionist. In 1862-63 she worked as a nurse in the Union Hospital in Georgetown D C. I n An Old-Fashioned Girl Polly, a sensibly brought-up country girl, encounters fashionable life on her first visit to Boston. Later she returns to live there and teach music. For grades 5-8.

30 review for An Old Fashioned Girl (eBook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kwesi 章英狮

    I'm one of the biggest fans of Louisa May Alcott after reading her Little Women when I was in high school. It was an amazing book that every girls and boys would love and cherish until end and it was one of the greatest classics that I read since I started reading. This time, Louisa May Alcott turned the old pages of this book into a magnificent old-fashioned story. Real and fluent in a way that every reader will appreciate the old ways and life of Polly Milton. Me, myself is an old-fashioned. I I'm one of the biggest fans of Louisa May Alcott after reading her Little Women when I was in high school. It was an amazing book that every girls and boys would love and cherish until end and it was one of the greatest classics that I read since I started reading. This time, Louisa May Alcott turned the old pages of this book into a magnificent old-fashioned story. Real and fluent in a way that every reader will appreciate the old ways and life of Polly Milton. Me, myself is an old-fashioned. I lived in a rural area before, no high buildings, few population, more green and fresh air. Money and style were never been a priority of every citizen. We cherish every simple blessings that we receive. Until, I went to an urban city where money and stars are ready to explode and every people are trying to catch every piece of those shiny stone. A little poverty might not hurt ones interest if we just live in simple and with harmony. This is the welcome sign built nearby the boundary of my hometown with the strong green color and blue sky that made every people live with harmony with nature. If I'm not mistaken, the city had planted many trees last month to be recognize in the Guinness Book of Records. Only few appreciated life in simple way and one of them is Polly Milton. When she was 14 she was invited by her friend Franny Shaw and to live with life in the city. Unfortunately, she was a girl with simple dresses and manner like an old-fashioned woman. She was rejected by many friends and people she met because of her taste in fashion as well as her point of view to simple life. After the rejection, she went back to her hometown and continued her life as a provincial girl. After six years, she went back to Boston to help her brother Will to enter college by teaching music lesson to her students. But a great lost happened to the Shaw, as their business become bad and they have to live in small expense. The kids were forced to live with Polly and live with their small income. Because of her selflessness and sacrifice, the Shaw brothers and sisters changed as the days came by and the simplest love become the greatest power to conquer poverty. First illustrated pictures of Louisa May Alcott's book as drawn and published by Roberts Bros. in 1870. Left, Polly went to Boston again. Right, Tom went back to Polly's place when he succeed in looking a job in the West. Like any Louisa May Alcott books, she always recognized her characters as old-fashioned in a way that they are simple, although through this book she emphasized it clearly the advantage of living with small poverty. No excess money to be used and to be contented in small things. But I must say, that the contentment of men never end as it is a continues process. At least in the end, she unleash the true essence of being simple not only for girls but to everyone. Although, Alcott's romantic interest of her characters were not interesting like in her other books. Purely, it was well written in an old-fashioned that looses the essence of writing it romantically or maybe she's not really a romantic writer itself and consider the words that her characters said as to be well-chosen. Other problem with it was too short and slow-paced that few may get interest to read this book. Her interest of making girls to read her books were more distinguished since she used a strong female characters and extras as well as dictating female clothes and manners in her generation. Not recommended to male readers but more recommended to those girls who enjoyed reading classics, chic-lit and young adult novels, and to those guys who are curious to read this book. But I can't guarantee the reader's likeness because of its girly content. The city celebrated T'nalak Festival, a week long celebration to show case its town's beauty and culture by many forms of arts by street dancing, fashion walk and many more. The T'nalak Festival is celebrated starting July 18. A must visit festival every year! Review posted on Old-Fashioned Reader . Rating: An Old-Fashioned Girl by Louisa May Alcott, 3 Sweets Challenges: Book #190 for 2011 Book #108 for Off the Shelf!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Loretta

    Cute story but I did not enjoy it as much as Little Women.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Starry

    Holy sermonizing, Batman! This isn't just an old-fashioned story, it's an old-fashioned way to tell a story -- heavy-handed preachiness in which dear little Polly, daughter of a poor minister, inspires morality among wealthy Bostonians, pleases her elders with her goodness and simplicity, and spreads joy to everyone in her path. As subtle as a tornado. If you can get past the preaching, the story has its charms. It shares some sweet elements with Little Women -- a spirited American girl grows up Holy sermonizing, Batman! This isn't just an old-fashioned story, it's an old-fashioned way to tell a story -- heavy-handed preachiness in which dear little Polly, daughter of a poor minister, inspires morality among wealthy Bostonians, pleases her elders with her goodness and simplicity, and spreads joy to everyone in her path. As subtle as a tornado. If you can get past the preaching, the story has its charms. It shares some sweet elements with Little Women -- a spirited American girl grows up poor but virtuous and eventually inspires her childhood playmate to exchange his foppishness for manliness. Hmm, sorry. That still sound kinda preachy and old-fashioned. Should I be embarrassed that it appeals to me? I also need to make a confession about Alcott's sermons -- as unpopular as this book would be to modern teens, I still will want my daughter to read it some day (preferably before she masters the eye roll). Alcott's social commentary, though 150 years old, is spot-on. In fact, not much has changed beyond fashion (snoods and bustles, anyone? some fetching muttonchop sleeves?). We still complain about kids growing up too fast and then acting bored and disaffected when they reach young adulthood. We still live in a society of gossip, back-stabbing, idleness, selfishness, waste and excess. Also, Alcott hits on a middle political ground that appeals to me. Nowadays, my Republican friends rail about how the poor need to suck it up and work harder and stop bleeding the system with their laziness. My Democrat friends point out that anyone who says this is completely out of touch with those outside their own social class, many of whom only lack opportunity. Alcott manages to balance both sides in a traditional, common-sense American approach: her idea of virtue is to work hard, to value independence, to be content with little; and yet she also sees virtue as generosity, providing charity (money, work, food/clothing) to those in need, fostering sympathetic and active awareness of and kindness toward those outside your social class. (Granted, Republican Friends, all her needy characters are willing to work hard and only lack opportunity. Still, in this big, imperfect world where greed and selfishness and laziness are not limited to any one class, I'd rather err on the side of mercy...) Similarly, Alcott's old-fashioned-sounding ideas of femininity initially sound abrasive but have an appeal. She celebrates marriage as equal yoking that capitalizes on the complementary natures of men and women. But, at the same time, she shows that an admirable woman is one who is confident, capable, self-sufficient, never simpering or false or overly delicate. Uh oh. Now who's sermonizing? Sorry. She started it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hallie

    I could never quite stomach Little Women, as a child or adult, but An Old-Fashioned Girl has all the positives of LW with less sentimentality, a proper romance with the right person, and social commentary I found much more powerful and direct than LW's. I loved it when I was young, reread it many times, and loved reading it to the girls. Then when I was doing my second-time round studying, and we read Portrait of a Lady, I had a Moment of profound significance. Okay, neither profound nor really s I could never quite stomach Little Women, as a child or adult, but An Old-Fashioned Girl has all the positives of LW with less sentimentality, a proper romance with the right person, and social commentary I found much more powerful and direct than LW's. I loved it when I was young, reread it many times, and loved reading it to the girls. Then when I was doing my second-time round studying, and we read Portrait of a Lady, I had a Moment of profound significance. Okay, neither profound nor really significant, but I liked my Moment. Just as James "rewrote" Middlemarch's Dorothea on her honeymoon in Rome in Portrait, I think Alcott "rewrote" Isabel Archer's sitting alone pondering by the fire scene with Polly doing exactly that in the "Nipped in the bud" chapter. Which made me very happy, even though I could find no evidence for the argument that it was an intentional homage. (A few years later I did an essay on AOFG and that was fun too.) (Well, writing the essay wasn't fun, but the research and thinking about how so many authors were writing interactively in the nineteenth century and how very much that included those who sometimes or always wrote for younger readers.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CN3w... Description: Tells the story of Polly, the old-fashioned girl, her friendship with the wealthy Shaws of Boston and the lessons she learns about happiness and riches.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laure

    I read 'Little Women' a long time ago and loved that book. Ok, I was much younger then. However, I cannot help but being disappointed by 'An Old-Fahsioned Girl'. The story is very sweet but marred by the narrator's preachy comments. They intrude on the story so much. I could not help smiling at times at some of them. 'Plus ca change'! Blaming the youth for their apparent lack of purpose and superficiality etc. Glad to know that our well meaning set have been at it for more than a century now. :P L I read 'Little Women' a long time ago and loved that book. Ok, I was much younger then. However, I cannot help but being disappointed by 'An Old-Fahsioned Girl'. The story is very sweet but marred by the narrator's preachy comments. They intrude on the story so much. I could not help smiling at times at some of them. 'Plus ca change'! Blaming the youth for their apparent lack of purpose and superficiality etc. Glad to know that our well meaning set have been at it for more than a century now. :P Looking at the date when the book was written - 1869 - it did advocate some more 'advanced' ideas about women's independence, that was nice. I am sure quite forward for the age.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I ended up enjoying this more than I expected to at the beginning, but it didn't make me care as much as Little Women. I think it's because a child was teaching children and adults to be better people, rather than an adult with life experience. It took longer for me to see the characters as individuals rather than caricatures. I was rooting for characters at the end, though, so I did care more than I thought.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Retna

    This book left me with such a happy feeling as a kid and I know I would still love this book when I read it again. It's like watching "The Sound of Music", you want to find comfort in it when the world dissapoints you, because you will be reminded that no matter what, being sincere and true to yourself will pay (and surely will get the boy/ the man you fall for!). Of course when you went to high school, you might learn another thing, that inner beauty didn't always prevail, thanks to the boys' h This book left me with such a happy feeling as a kid and I know I would still love this book when I read it again. It's like watching "The Sound of Music", you want to find comfort in it when the world dissapoints you, because you will be reminded that no matter what, being sincere and true to yourself will pay (and surely will get the boy/ the man you fall for!). Of course when you went to high school, you might learn another thing, that inner beauty didn't always prevail, thanks to the boys' hormones who will ask for more than just you having a heart of gold. But those boys will be men, and the right men will want to get the ones with inner beauty. So yes, tell your dearest daughters that inner beauty rocks, and one trait that this materialistic, superficial world will surely need.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne Osterlund

    Polly Milton is a fourteen-year-old country girl raised on old-fashioned values and invited to Boston for an extended stay with her friend, Fanny Shaw. Quite the unlikely friendship since Fanny, despite being only two years older, is no longer just a girl, not poor, and not old-fashioned. Little does Polly know the breakers which lie ahead: flounces and frizzles and the height of fashion, girls who consider flirtation the true purpose of schooling, and one particularly beastly red-headed boy who Polly Milton is a fourteen-year-old country girl raised on old-fashioned values and invited to Boston for an extended stay with her friend, Fanny Shaw. Quite the unlikely friendship since Fanny, despite being only two years older, is no longer just a girl, not poor, and not old-fashioned. Little does Polly know the breakers which lie ahead: flounces and frizzles and the height of fashion, girls who consider flirtation the true purpose of schooling, and one particularly beastly red-headed boy who insists on plaguing his sister’s country friend. Aww. I first fell in love with An Old-Fashioned Girl after discovering a hard copy version amongst the Louisa May Alcott collection on my grandmother’s shelf. That copy, which was in perfectly decent condition when I first read it, is now so tattered I doubt the cover or the binding would survive another reading. This is my favorite Louisa May Alcott book and also one of my favorite books of all time. All the characters have spunk and fire and flaws. The dialogue is engaging, and it’s fun to hear the slang of the era. (I also love how the little sister, Maud, speaks with a lisp throughout the first portion of the novel). Like Little Women, An Old-Fashioned Girl begins with the main character in her teens, then fast forwards in time. Six years to be exact for the final two-thirds of the novel. All the main characters (Polly, Fan, and Tom) are forced to learn to swim or sink in the face of scheming marriage hunters, the societal expectations of Boston’s High Society, and the allure and illusion of monetary security. One of those novels I can read again . . . and again . . . and again. In a way, Louisa May Alcott wrote An Old-Fashioned Girl to please all those readers who were heartbroken by the way she ended Little Women. And personally, I am so glad she did.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abigayle Claire

    This will forever be one of my favorite books (tying with The Scarlet Pimpernel). I love and relate to Polly so, so much and I think her plight of having to remain secure in who she is, is something girls of today can still relate to. None of the characters are perfect, but their interactions and desire to be better makes the book very compelling as it follows Polly's visits to her (very different) friend, Fanny's, house. It's similar to some of Alcott's other works because of the strong life le This will forever be one of my favorite books (tying with The Scarlet Pimpernel). I love and relate to Polly so, so much and I think her plight of having to remain secure in who she is, is something girls of today can still relate to. None of the characters are perfect, but their interactions and desire to be better makes the book very compelling as it follows Polly's visits to her (very different) friend, Fanny's, house. It's similar to some of Alcott's other works because of the strong life lessons and family values that come through the anecdotal storytelling, but much shorter and simpler than Little Women. While the book itself is definitely old-fashioned, this world could do with some of that, especially in the areas of friendship despite differences and security despite ridicule.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patience

    I love this book. I've read it once before, several years ago, but I didn't remember much of it and it was fun to go through it again - especially now that I appreciate all the lessons tucked into "Old Fashioned Girl". Polly Milton rather reminded me of Pollyanna in a way - she comes to the city to visit her best friend Fanny Shaw and brings the sunshine with her to a rich but struggling household. She is a blessing to those around her, and her old-fashioned ways turn out to be the best as Polly I love this book. I've read it once before, several years ago, but I didn't remember much of it and it was fun to go through it again - especially now that I appreciate all the lessons tucked into "Old Fashioned Girl". Polly Milton rather reminded me of Pollyanna in a way - she comes to the city to visit her best friend Fanny Shaw and brings the sunshine with her to a rich but struggling household. She is a blessing to those around her, and her old-fashioned ways turn out to be the best as Polly influences the circle she finds herself in. Some might call Louisa May Alcott's books preachy, but I love them, and I must say I enjoyed Miss Alcott's insight into a girl's character/emotions. Made me smile and nod in agreement! :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 3 STARS Polly is invited to stay with wealthy friends in Boston and finds herself to be an old-fashioned country girl. She is not worldly about parties, boys or acting like she has money. She would prefer to help her elders, read books and spend her time with hobbies. Polly seems to be helping each of the Shaws more than receiving their patronage. I LOVE Little Women so was excited to read another book by Alcott but I found this one to lack the heart and story of Little Women. An Old-Fash RATING: 3 STARS Polly is invited to stay with wealthy friends in Boston and finds herself to be an old-fashioned country girl. She is not worldly about parties, boys or acting like she has money. She would prefer to help her elders, read books and spend her time with hobbies. Polly seems to be helping each of the Shaws more than receiving their patronage. I LOVE Little Women so was excited to read another book by Alcott but I found this one to lack the heart and story of Little Women. An Old-Fashioned Girl I think is more simplistic and fluffy. You never get to really know Polly like you do the characters in Little Women and the storyline does not have much climax. It is a fair book and if I read it as a child maybe I would have liked it a lot more. My Novelesque Blog

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I confess I've only read Part One a few times, but I must have read Part Two at least a dozen. I'm not sure I can quite explain why a piece of juvenile fiction that suffers from no pretensions of being a great work of art is one of my absolute favorite books, but it is. There is something beautiful to me about the simplicity of the characters, the straightforward and unapologetic morality, and the everyday historical tidbits sprinkled through this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

    This is one of Louisa May Alcott's lesser known novels, but it is a good one ... in my opinion it's one of her best. I read it back when I was thirteen and I think it really shaped my adolescence. I kind of embraced being old fashioned because of this book. Polly is so thrifty and I loved the idea of being creative and saving money, especially as a poor teenager. It's a good book ... especially for younger girls, or older ones that like remembering simpler times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emanuela

    Un classico “evergreen”, scritto a fine Ottocento ma che ha molto da insegnare ad adolescenti e genitori di oggi. Due amiche, una ricca, il cui unico problema è scegliere il vestito da indossare, ed una povera, sempre con il sorriso sulle labbra e sempre pronta ad aiutare il prossimo, soprattutto quello più sfortunato di lei. ~Il contatto con la povertà mi rende riconoscente e grata di quello che ho, mi fa sentire ricca e mi rende disponibile a fare quanto posso per quelle disgraziate creature. ~. Un classico “evergreen”, scritto a fine Ottocento ma che ha molto da insegnare ad adolescenti e genitori di oggi. Due amiche, una ricca, il cui unico problema è scegliere il vestito da indossare, ed una povera, sempre con il sorriso sulle labbra e sempre pronta ad aiutare il prossimo, soprattutto quello più sfortunato di lei. ~Il contatto con la povertà mi rende riconoscente e grata di quello che ho, mi fa sentire ricca e mi rende disponibile a fare quanto posso per quelle disgraziate creature. ~...quante cose i poveri sono in grado di insegnare ai ricchi... ~Ci sono buoni sentimenti, dolcezza, rassegnazione anche nei casi più squallidi: basta avere occhi per vederli, cuore per intuire. È molto chiaro il messaggio che ci lascia l’autrice: non sono i soldi, le frivolezze, le cose materiali a fare la felicità, bensì l’amicizia e l’amore verso il prossimo, la famiglia ed anche verso il lavoro. Cerco soltanto di prendere tutto dal lato migliore: è una ricetta quasi infallibile. Non puoi immaginare quante cose buone di possono tirar fuori dalle situazioni più difficili, se solo ci si prova. Si potrebbero fare tantissime altre citazioni, tutte dense di significato, l’ultima e poi mi fermo qui: Se cerchi di combattere i tuoi guai, li hai già risolti per metà.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn Buxton

    I went into this book knowing it would be good, and needing “a little old-fashioned,” (to shamelessly quote Phil Coulson), but I had no idea that it would take me on such a roller-coaster of emotions. I experienced just about every feeling under the sun while reading An Old-Fashioned Girl... and that's the true magic of storytelling. Polly "I don’t want a religion that I put away with my Sunday clothes, and don’t take out till the day comes round again; I want something to see and feel and live b I went into this book knowing it would be good, and needing “a little old-fashioned,” (to shamelessly quote Phil Coulson), but I had no idea that it would take me on such a roller-coaster of emotions. I experienced just about every feeling under the sun while reading An Old-Fashioned Girl... and that's the true magic of storytelling. Polly "I don’t want a religion that I put away with my Sunday clothes, and don’t take out till the day comes round again; I want something to see and feel and live by day-by-day.” This girl is one of Alcott’s characteristic strong-yet-feminine heroines, and I liked her more and more as the story progressed. She was a lot like Meg from Little Women, and to be honest, a big chunk of the book was like an extended version of Meg’s visit to the Moffats. But instead of succumbing so much to peer pressure, Polly brought her good old-fashioned sunshine into the worldly-minded house of the Shaws. That said, she was still an imperfect human being, and I loved that. Tom “… I’m only a curse instead of a comfort.” Tom reminded me so much of Laurie, that I couldn’t help but love him. His character arc was one of the most poignant in the book (although his sister Fanny did a fair amount of growing too), and by the end he’d gone from a harum-scarum boy, to an unmistakable dandy, and finally, to a man. Another thing I have always liked about Alcott’s writing is her witty descriptions. I found myself frequently stopping to chuckle, smile, or simply ponder a phrase or idea. There was a fair amount of “moralizing,” as some of her characters would put it, but I never found it overpowering. We need more old-fashioned girls (and boys) in the world. In closing, if you like sweet, simple tales of love, friendship, and remembering the important things in life, this book is for you.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Re-reading September 2016 Nov 2013: ALouisa May Alcott classic and deservedly so. Many reviewers warned of the disconnect between the first and second section. The first portion of the book was originally written in serial and the second portion was the conclusion of the story making it printable as a book. Some reviewers complained that the break of six years between the two sections was awkward. I do not agree with that concern. While I agree that the two sections do read differently from each o Re-reading September 2016 Nov 2013: ALouisa May Alcott classic and deservedly so. Many reviewers warned of the disconnect between the first and second section. The first portion of the book was originally written in serial and the second portion was the conclusion of the story making it printable as a book. Some reviewers complained that the break of six years between the two sections was awkward. I do not agree with that concern. While I agree that the two sections do read differently from each other, it feels appropriate as there is a distinction between the ages of the characters - children at the start and young adults in the end. While the book was perfectly enjoyable, it was not, in my opinion LMA's best work. The story is charming but a little forced (and rushed) in the final pages. While the characters are interesting, I did not find them as well developed as those in the Little Women series or my favorite, the Rose Campbell series (Eight Cousins/Rose In Bloom). A charming and sweet escape, I will always love this book but never consider it is as strong as some of the others.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josiphine/Tessa

    Ah, I love this book. For some reason the first time I go sledding each winter it makes me think of that two-page sledding scene (not Jack and Jill for some obscure reason) and I read it all over again. My only real complaint is that Polly is pretty nearly perfect and the last chapter devolves into utter sap--though Alcott apologizes very prettily for it first. Just good. March 2017: I think that this is the worst of Alcott's books as far as the technical aspects go, but I still really enjoy read Ah, I love this book. For some reason the first time I go sledding each winter it makes me think of that two-page sledding scene (not Jack and Jill for some obscure reason) and I read it all over again. My only real complaint is that Polly is pretty nearly perfect and the last chapter devolves into utter sap--though Alcott apologizes very prettily for it first. Just good. March 2017: I think that this is the worst of Alcott's books as far as the technical aspects go, but I still really enjoy reading it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have been slowly making my way through this novel for a while. True, this book isn't as strong as her other stories, I always love Alcott. In our world, differences between men and women or discouraged. One of the things I love about Alcott's stories is good girls were homemakers and did womanly things, but it didn't make her girls weak. This was such a sweet, simple story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Natasha GJ Nanny Nakia

    Reseñado en mi blog Nanny Books Este tipo de libros me encantan. Recuerdo que la lectura de Mujercitas fue muy especial para mí, adoraba a Teddy y Jo era mi favorita. Habré leído esa novela unas siete veces a lo largo de mi preadolescencia, hasta que presté el libro a una amiga y nunca me lo devolvió. Hace unos años me lo compré de nuevo, pero en otra edición (lo que me dolió mucho). Cuando vi a Una chica a la antigua reeditado, no pude evitar quererlo inmediatamente. Son novelas diferentes y par Reseñado en mi blog Nanny Books Este tipo de libros me encantan. Recuerdo que la lectura de Mujercitas fue muy especial para mí, adoraba a Teddy y Jo era mi favorita. Habré leído esa novela unas siete veces a lo largo de mi preadolescencia, hasta que presté el libro a una amiga y nunca me lo devolvió. Hace unos años me lo compré de nuevo, pero en otra edición (lo que me dolió mucho). Cuando vi a Una chica a la antigua reeditado, no pude evitar quererlo inmediatamente. Son novelas diferentes y parecidas al mismo tiempo, la pluma de Alcott mantiene cierto paralelismo, pero la doctrina feminista se ve mucho más claramente aquí. "... preguntándose si llegaría alguna vez el momento en que las mujeres pudieran ganar un poco de dinero y fama sin pagar un precio tan alto por ellos..." Polly es una chica criada en el campo, de mente sana y con buena conducta. Cuando visita a su amiga Fanny, toda una citadina, se encuentra con que sus vestidos no son lo suficientemente hermosos, sus costumbres son muy anticuadas y los flirteos le esquivan. Sin embargo, la amistad entre las niñas perdura y años después Polly vuelve a la ciudad en busca de un futuro. Condimentando la historia con pasajes morales, la narración en tercera persona mantiene un buen ritmo, alternando el foco de atención entre los variados personajes. Escenas cargadas de humor se mezclarán con aquellas más bien nostálgicas, romances nuevos y romances viejos jugarán a enredar a los protagonistas, pero sin crear triángulos amorosos innecesarios (saben cuanto odio que hagan esas cosas). Con algunos personajes es más fácil saber de quién están enamorados, pero otros esconderán en secreto el nombre que los hace suspirar. Se jugará un buen dilema con Polly y su amor, del cual podemos ir sospechando algo, pero que no descubriremos en su totalidad hasta los últimos capítulos. Así que, en general, el romance no será el tema central del argumento ni será completamente empalagoso. "Los hombres deben respetar a las mujeres como estas, pensó. Sí, y también deben amarlas, pues a pesar de su independencia de espíritu, siguen siendo femeninas." Criticando a la sociedad de la época, hablando sobre ayudar a los más necesitados, tratar bien a los sirvientes, propagar el feminismo y realizar una economía ahorrativa, Polly irá ganándose el corazón de sus conocidos y llegando a inculcar estas ideas. Además de los personajes femeninos, también tendremos la evolución de Tom, el hermano de Fanny, al cual conoceremos desde que era un niño aventurero y travieso. Fue uno de mis personajes favoritos y seguramente es el que más matices tenga, aparte de Polly. Una chica a la antigua es una historia muy dulce, con escenas cargadas de emoción y personajes encantadores. Una novela entretenida, que lleva el sello inconfundible de la pluma de Alcott y que nos atrapará de la misma manera que Mujercitas. Recomendado solo para aquellas lectores que gusten del género.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is now my favorite Louisa May book. I can't believe it has taken me this long to read it. This book is full of goodness, truth, and beauty. I love it. Miss Mills to Polly: “Then, my dear, can't you bear a little ridicule for the sake of a good cause? You said yesterday that you were going to make it a principle of your life, to help up your sex as far and as fast as you could. It did my heart good to hear you say it, for I was sure that in time you would keep your word. But, Polly, a principl This is now my favorite Louisa May book. I can't believe it has taken me this long to read it. This book is full of goodness, truth, and beauty. I love it. Miss Mills to Polly: “Then, my dear, can't you bear a little ridicule for the sake of a good cause? You said yesterday that you were going to make it a principle of your life, to help up your sex as far and as fast as you could. It did my heart good to hear you say it, for I was sure that in time you would keep your word. But, Polly, a principle that can't bear being laughed at, frowned on, and cold-shouldered, is n't worthy of the name.”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    **3.5**

  23. 4 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    Written the year after Little Women, and it shows. I had never read this book until now (thank you Gutenberg) and I see I haven't missed much. It seems to be a recycling of themes from LW, in particular Meg's visit to the wealthy Gardiners and her experiences at their balls and parties, as a "poor relation" (though unrelated). We also find themes that will come into their own in Rose in Bloom: the strong-minded women who are still "little womanly" enough to find their real fulfillment, not in th Written the year after Little Women, and it shows. I had never read this book until now (thank you Gutenberg) and I see I haven't missed much. It seems to be a recycling of themes from LW, in particular Meg's visit to the wealthy Gardiners and her experiences at their balls and parties, as a "poor relation" (though unrelated). We also find themes that will come into their own in Rose in Bloom: the strong-minded women who are still "little womanly" enough to find their real fulfillment, not in their art or intellectual pursuits, but in marriage and homemaking for a man and children; plus rich women channelling their money and free time into charitable works in search of redemption. The "plot" such as it is, hangs together very loosely--first Polly goes on a visit to Snob Hill for what appears to be several months (why, is never explained), and then suddenly, boom! "Six Years Later" she turns up again, determined to be independent by teaching music--just like Phoebe in Rose in Bloom. Where Little Women and other Alcott books manage to mix a little sugar and spice of fun and humour in with the moralising, AOFG is simply sanctimonious and preachy--particularly about the sin of wearing fashionable clothes! This must be what Alcott rebelled against in her correspondence when she spoke of being tired of writing "moral pap for the young." It really feels as if Alcott wrote it in order to keep herself in the public eye; Polly is a Pollyanna prig, and so is the narrative voice! Funny how Polly's brother is determined to be a minister, but they never attend church. I was heartily tired of her before the end of the book, and I got the impression her author was too. By that time, Alcott is writing in generalities, as if she was as eager to write The End as I was to reach it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meredith (Austenesque Reviews)

    Do you ever feel like you are tied up in our times? Worrying too much about cell phones, fashions, and the latest whatevers? This book can set you straight. It gives you a peace of mind and fills you with simple pleasures. The stories main character, Polly, we meet at the age of 14. She has come to stay with rich friends for a while. THey do everything so differently from she. The family has two daughters. One that is two years older than Polly called Fan, who cares for fashion, balls, and beaus Do you ever feel like you are tied up in our times? Worrying too much about cell phones, fashions, and the latest whatevers? This book can set you straight. It gives you a peace of mind and fills you with simple pleasures. The stories main character, Polly, we meet at the age of 14. She has come to stay with rich friends for a while. THey do everything so differently from she. The family has two daughters. One that is two years older than Polly called Fan, who cares for fashion, balls, and beaus. The author daughter is six and she is fixed onoo having her own way about everything. THe young man in the family Tom is a trouble maker, who no matter how hard he tries can't seem to stay out of trouble very long. Polly is a gentle, kind, loving, caring, selfless, practical, and sensible girl. SHe becomes a great service to this family, touching each of them in a special way. She moves in the same town six years later and gives piano lessons. The family needs her more than ever and she helps them all in the end. This book has heart, romance, and realness to it that we can all relate to, rich or poor, young or old. It will make you feel warm fuzzies. Read on a rainy day underneath a flanel blanket!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    When this first started, I wondered why I loved this book so much years ago (I always saw this title and thought, "I LOVE that book" although I couldn't remember a thing about it)! Polly didn't seem very endearing in her young years, but the chapter where six years have passed, I begin to enjoy her merits much more. And yes, she became very endearing. What a sweet tale, with a lovely, classic style of writing. I've always loved Louisa May Alcott's way of describing things, and she brought this st When this first started, I wondered why I loved this book so much years ago (I always saw this title and thought, "I LOVE that book" although I couldn't remember a thing about it)! Polly didn't seem very endearing in her young years, but the chapter where six years have passed, I begin to enjoy her merits much more. And yes, she became very endearing. What a sweet tale, with a lovely, classic style of writing. I've always loved Louisa May Alcott's way of describing things, and she brought this story to life extremely well. The relationships throughout are so sweet and homey. I could completely understand Polly and Will's brother-and-sister relationship and it made my very well. Then there's Tom and Fanny who I couldn't help love :) The beginning few chapters I skimmed because I was a little bored with it, but otherwise this book held my attention. A sweet read, that I'm glad I read again! The ending was very satisfying :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bibliovoracious

    Ok, it was slightly better than Little Women, maybe because there were fewer of them to be relentlessly testing my gag reflex with their moralizing and aspirations to goodness. My second star comes from a whole two pages, a scene that almost doesn't fit with the rest of the book, where LMA gives a glimpse into her changing time, and the future: Becky is sculpting a woman "bigger, lovelier, and more imposing" than any other women of the day. One "set" of Polly's friends are artists and writers wi Ok, it was slightly better than Little Women, maybe because there were fewer of them to be relentlessly testing my gag reflex with their moralizing and aspirations to goodness. My second star comes from a whole two pages, a scene that almost doesn't fit with the rest of the book, where LMA gives a glimpse into her changing time, and the future: Becky is sculpting a woman "bigger, lovelier, and more imposing" than any other women of the day. One "set" of Polly's friends are artists and writers with ambitions- as "independent as birds", who don't give a fig for money, fashion, or society. These girls, visited in just the one chapter, have an inchoate vision of an ideal of womanhood before them- "someday" - when women can earn, vote, be respected by men and loved through respect, and BE something more than the available identities of queen, helpmate, and mother. This is the momentary visit to a possible future that speaks to the awakening questions and dreams of the beginning of suffrage. The 13th chapter somewhat redeems the period piece of the rest of the book, where the girls wade simpering helplessly in the morass of society, their potential futures hinging on marriage and their moral goodness, and poverty rules as the ultimate source of virtue.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    This was a pleasant surprise. Alcott's writing is still pretty 19th-century sentimental to the modern reader, but you get used to it after a bit. I think the main reason her books (including this one) have stood the test of time, despite their archaic style, is that her characters are so lovably imperfect. Watching them strive for moral improvement may be arduous for some, but is inspiring and relatable for me and many other readers. Alcott's sense of humor is delightfully homespun and (unlike o This was a pleasant surprise. Alcott's writing is still pretty 19th-century sentimental to the modern reader, but you get used to it after a bit. I think the main reason her books (including this one) have stood the test of time, despite their archaic style, is that her characters are so lovably imperfect. Watching them strive for moral improvement may be arduous for some, but is inspiring and relatable for me and many other readers. Alcott's sense of humor is delightfully homespun and (unlike other sentimental novels) the emotional responses of the characters seem natural rather than overblown. This was a gem--as good or maybe better than Little Women, and following a young working girl in the 19th century is particularly interesting. I would recommend this to select, nostalgic readers, but not all.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tittirossa

    Non so se questa edizione sia condensata o se originariamente sia così breve, ma non è altro che un Piccole Donne in miniatura. Una brava ragazza, assennata, che segue il proprio cuore, che ovviamente non batter per il ricco-e-bello-e-gentile ma per un altro molto meno appetibile (perlomeno ai nostri occhi). Sarebbe bello se qualcuno riscrivesse il seguito di Piccole Donne, in una versione in cui Jo adesca i ragazzini, Terry e Amy si fanno le corna, e Meg diventa una casalinga che per superare la Non so se questa edizione sia condensata o se originariamente sia così breve, ma non è altro che un Piccole Donne in miniatura. Una brava ragazza, assennata, che segue il proprio cuore, che ovviamente non batter per il ricco-e-bello-e-gentile ma per un altro molto meno appetibile (perlomeno ai nostri occhi). Sarebbe bello se qualcuno riscrivesse il seguito di Piccole Donne, in una versione in cui Jo adesca i ragazzini, Terry e Amy si fanno le corna, e Meg diventa una casalinga che per superare la frustrazione sniffa colla. E invece, sono sempre vittima del fascino di Jo. E leggo Alcott anche se non ho più 12 anni!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    What a sweet, touching, humorous, classic book!! “An old fashioned girl” is one of my favorites. I read it once last year, and I liked it. I thought it was cute! After this past year, when I went through some things that made me realize being myself is okay, this book took on a new meaning. Here’s a synopsis: In the first part, 14 year old Polly Milton leaves her modest, poor home and life in the country to visit her wealthy friend, Fanny Shaw who lives in the bustling, lively city. Polly soon re What a sweet, touching, humorous, classic book!! “An old fashioned girl” is one of my favorites. I read it once last year, and I liked it. I thought it was cute! After this past year, when I went through some things that made me realize being myself is okay, this book took on a new meaning. Here’s a synopsis: In the first part, 14 year old Polly Milton leaves her modest, poor home and life in the country to visit her wealthy friend, Fanny Shaw who lives in the bustling, lively city. Polly soon realizes how different she is from the other girls. She doesn’t dress up, she is scandalized by their books and plays, she does childish things, her hair is cut short, and she is respectful to adults. But even she can be tempted by the many perks to city life. The Shaw family consists of the hard working Mr. Shaw, the sickly, demanding Mrs. Shaw, the elderly Mrs. Shaw (Mr. Shaw’s mother), the spoiled Fanny, the prankster (and neglected) Tom Jr, and the larger-than-life 6 year old tyrant Maude (who speaks “wike this” and haves “newves like Mama”). Polly ends up changing all of them with her sweet disposition and perseverant heart. In the second half, we fast forward 6 years later. Polly gets a room in the city to teach singing to children. She has grown up and matured a lot since 14. There is lots in this section about trying to overcome the temptations of city life, finding romance, and true friendships. As the characters are older in this half, you get more of the deep stuff. Why is Tom such a party animal? Why can’t Fanny find joy in anything anymore? Why is Tom engaged to the bratty, Alfa-female, Trix? And does Mr. Sydney love Polly? You’ll just have to find out! ;)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angie Thompson

    Re-reading for the no-ideath time. :) Like this book a lot, although I always wondered how Polly and Fanny ever became friends in the first place with how extremely different they were. Can't help loving the way the romance eventually works out, too... And am I allowed to say I love the LibriVox dramatic reading even though I had a hand in making it? Seriously, though, everyone did such a great job! <3<3 Content--a few uses of "the deuce" and "the devil"; one kiss (not descriptive); arguing Re-reading for the no-ideath time. :) Like this book a lot, although I always wondered how Polly and Fanny ever became friends in the first place with how extremely different they were. Can't help loving the way the romance eventually works out, too... And am I allowed to say I love the LibriVox dramatic reading even though I had a hand in making it? Seriously, though, everyone did such a great job! <3<3 Content--a few uses of "the deuce" and "the devil"; one kiss (not descriptive); arguing and name-calling; disobedience to parents (punished); discreet mentions of an attempted suicide

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