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The Raven: With Literary and Historical Commentary

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An excellent early study of Poe's masterpiece from a literary rather than a psychological point of view. The author discusses "the most popular lyric poem in the world" in terms of the creative genesis of the poem and the history of the poem. Mr. Ingram presents translations that were made into French, German, Hungarian and Latin, a number of fabrications that were publish An excellent early study of Poe's masterpiece from a literary rather than a psychological point of view. The author discusses "the most popular lyric poem in the world" in terms of the creative genesis of the poem and the history of the poem. Mr. Ingram presents translations that were made into French, German, Hungarian and Latin, a number of fabrications that were published, and some of the many parodies to which the poem gave rise. Incudes a bibliography of the early publishing history of the poem.


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An excellent early study of Poe's masterpiece from a literary rather than a psychological point of view. The author discusses "the most popular lyric poem in the world" in terms of the creative genesis of the poem and the history of the poem. Mr. Ingram presents translations that were made into French, German, Hungarian and Latin, a number of fabrications that were publish An excellent early study of Poe's masterpiece from a literary rather than a psychological point of view. The author discusses "the most popular lyric poem in the world" in terms of the creative genesis of the poem and the history of the poem. Mr. Ingram presents translations that were made into French, German, Hungarian and Latin, a number of fabrications that were published, and some of the many parodies to which the poem gave rise. Incudes a bibliography of the early publishing history of the poem.

30 review for The Raven: With Literary and Historical Commentary

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    Shall we descend into madness? Shall we be haunted by our own desires? Shall we be consumed by that terrible facet of life known only as death? Shall we cling to what cannot be reanimated? Shall we wish for a return of something that has long been in darkness? Shall we become obliterated by the brutal finality of such a statement as “nevermore?” Lenore has gone. She has departed from this life, and is permanently out of the reach of the man. The raven represents the solidarity of this. Despite h Shall we descend into madness? Shall we be haunted by our own desires? Shall we be consumed by that terrible facet of life known only as death? Shall we cling to what cannot be reanimated? Shall we wish for a return of something that has long been in darkness? Shall we become obliterated by the brutal finality of such a statement as “nevermore?” Lenore has gone. She has departed from this life, and is permanently out of the reach of the man. The raven represents the solidarity of this. Despite how much he longs for the impossible, despite how much he hopes for something that could never occur, he still has that inclination that the fantastical could happen: he has to believe that she could come back. And the raven represents the voice of reason, the voice of actuality. And it kills him. It is pain, despair, melancholy and a spiritual death all rolled into one haunting feathery package. He rebels against this voice of rationality. He knows the voice speaks the truth, but he cannot simply accept it. He has lost something vital; he has lost part of himself that will never grace his presence again. And he clings to hope, a false hope such as it is. The raven smashes this to oblivion; it destroys any last semblance of the miraculous occurring. It makes the man realise that this is life, not some whimsical world where nothing bad ever happens. People die. People we love die. Nothing can change that. Lenore will never walk through his chamber door again, and the reality drives him into madness. It shatters his life. ”And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted- nevermore!” His soul will never lift anymore; hope shall never be lifted anymore. By the end of the poem he has full realised the reality of the situation. The raven, the dark bird of harsh truth, the harbinger of the words he simply doesn’t want to hear, has become demonised. It has become the very object he did not want to face; he created a sense of longing to protect himself from the emotional loss of Lenore, and this bubble of falsehood has been burst. Reality sets in, and it is a fate worse than death. It is one of persecution and mental chaos as the bird is simply unable to supply the man with all his answers. He is driven mad by the unknown. The man in the poem has lost “Lenore.” But, what is this Lenore? Is she a woman? Is she this man’s lost love? Or is she something much, much, more? I think on the surface level of the poem she is his dead wife. But the archaic references speak of something else. Lenore could perhaps be a universal suggestion of a lost sense of self or even humanity. We are no longer what we once were. It is also rather significant that the man is persecuted only by the natural world. Very much in the Romanticism vein, man stands aside from nature. He has become something different with his modernisation and industrialisation. He walks outside his nature. And Poe, being an anti-transcendentalism thinker (a dark romantic), demonstrates that life isn’t all sunshine and roses, and nor could it ever be. It is pessimism in full force, and although I strongly disagree with the outlook on life, and appreciate the idealistic utopia offered in the poetry of Percy Shelley and other Romantics much more, I do love the dark beauty of this poem. The finality of the phrase “nevermore” is nothing short of maddening reality for our lost man. It is the end of hope. This is quite easily one of Poe's finest works, and I highly recommend listening to this version of the poem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Befli... (It's narrated by Christopher Lee!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annet

    Nevermore! ........... Read this poem, listen to this poem and study the drawings of Gustave Dore... and know this is a unique masterpiece. Hauntingly beautiful. Brooding, dark, desperate, mysterious... These starting lines are famous I think: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. "'Tis some visiter," I m Nevermore! ........... Read this poem, listen to this poem and study the drawings of Gustave Dore... and know this is a unique masterpiece. Hauntingly beautiful. Brooding, dark, desperate, mysterious... These starting lines are famous I think: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. "'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door -- Only this, and nothing more." Hauntingly beautiful. The encounter of a man mourning over his deceased wife Lenore and a darkblack raven.....And the additional beauty of it, go to YouTube and listen to a really brooding telling by Sir Christopher Lee. Listen how he says "Nevermore!" in a gruelling way. I first read it, studied the drawings and then I started listening.... And if you search further there are tellings by Christopher Walken and of course, Vincent Price. All wonderful and weird, intriguing. Edgar Allen Poe, what was in his mind? Brilliant writer! ....Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow:-vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore - For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore - Nameless here for evermore.... Christopher Lee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Befli... Christopher Walken: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7G_f... Vincent Price: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7zR3...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Happy Halloween, EAP! This is probably the best poem in history ever to have sold for $9. But what is it about? That's a more difficult question. The poem has undeniable power, but its power (as in much of Poe) is not entirely susceptible of rational explication. First, there's the sheer liturgical music of the poem, as evidenced from the very opening lines: "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore-- While I nodded, near Happy Halloween, EAP! This is probably the best poem in history ever to have sold for $9. But what is it about? That's a more difficult question. The poem has undeniable power, but its power (as in much of Poe) is not entirely susceptible of rational explication. First, there's the sheer liturgical music of the poem, as evidenced from the very opening lines: "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore-- While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. ''Tis some visiter,' I muttered, 'tapping at my chamber door-- Only this and nothing more.'" We've technically got 8-syllable troches here (trochaic octometer?), with the stress on the first syllable of each line, but the real genius is how the rhymes weave in and out of the lines, with the rhymes not just happening at the end of each line but also in between (dreary / weary; napping / tapping). As a reader, you get so caught up in the sing-song rhymes that what exactly is happening seems secondary, and the fact that it's often opaque seems irrelevant to its linguistic power. Or perhaps it heightens its power in the same way as the Latin Mass, through the sheer rhythmic beauty of the sounds themselves. Because really almost nothing is explained here--who's Lenore? What's the raven doing? Was there another visitor at the door? What does "nevermore" mean? No, as in much of Poe, what's transcendent here is the feeling, the emotion, of dread, loss, and the slow descent into madness, until at the end, "the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting" about his door, "And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor / Shall be lifted--nevermore!"

  4. 4 out of 5

    James

    First... you must read the introductory stanza from Edgar Allan Poe's famous poem, The Raven. And then I'll provide a short review: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore— While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. “’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door— Only this and nothing more.” And this is what will happen to you First... you must read the introductory stanza from Edgar Allan Poe's famous poem, The Raven. And then I'll provide a short review: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore— While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. “’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door— Only this and nothing more.” And this is what will happen to you once you read it: Yeah, I probably should have told you that part first, huh? But that's the thing about Mr. Poe. He enjoyed the fact that his writing drove him crazy. And all of us. That tapping... non-stop... reminds you of his other work, The Tell-Tale Heart. This raven and its real or imaginary appearance is such a powerful image. And here's the thing about this poem... you need to have a professional read this poem aloud, perhaps with a little music in the background. Just a little bit, as the words in the poem... the rhymes, the images... it's ghastly. And if the speaker is as brilliant as Poe, (s)he will alter their voice as each line erupts, enticing the rhythm and the beat. And when it happens, the fear will surround you. The words will penetrate you as your eyes ears lay still, absorbing the melody and the lyrics. It may sound funny, but find a recording of it. Listen to it in a semi-dark room. And just let the poem attack your mind and body. I believe it's what inspired the boat ride in the Willy Wonka movie... only much darker. You will love it! About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Raven, Edgar Allan Poe "The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress The Raven, Edgar Allan Poe "The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore— While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. "'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door— Only this and nothing more." عنوان: کلاغ؛ شاعر: ادگار آلن پو؛ بازسرایش: سپیده جدیری؛ تهران، ماهریز، 1385؛ در 126 ص؛ شابک: 9647729634؛ موضوع: شعرهای شاعران سده 19 م عنوان: کلاغ و اشعار دیگر؛ شاعر: ادگار آلن پو؛ مترجم: محمدصادق رئیسی؛ تهران، پیام امروز، 1395؛ در 173 ص؛ شابک: 9789645706935؛ شعر کلاغ: بازسروده سپیده جدیری در انزوای نیمه شبی دلتنگ آنگه که او چو خاطره ای کمرنگ اندیشه های تلخ مرا اندود چشمان من ز خواب، بخارآلود ناگه کوبه های کسی بر در آرام، همچو زمزمه نجواگر نجوای من به خویش، ملامتگر یک میهمان خسته ی ناهنگام یک میهمان خسته و دیگر هیچ اینک به خاطر آورم آن را، آه ماه دسامبر، نیمه شبی جانکاه گویی گذار روشن اخگر بود روحی که در اتاق شناور بود در حسرت سپیده دمان بودم بیهوده، در تلاش گریز از غم آری، غمش مرا به جهان تفته ست دوشیزه ای که از کف من رفته ست بی نام دوشیزه ی اینجا بود بی نام، سربسته و دیگر هیچ آنگاه، خش خشی که مرا افکند در چنگ تـَنگ وحشت بی مانند از قلب سرخ پرده برون آمد نجوای من دوباره نهیبم زد یک میهمان خسته ی ناهنگام یک میهمان خسته و دیگر هیچ گفتم: ببخش، منتظر بر در گویی ز قعر خواب شنید این سَر آنک کسی به کوبه ی پر تردید در را - چنان که زمزمه ای - کوبید در باز شد به عمق سیاه شب یک شامگاه تیره و دیگر هیچ بر شامگاه تیره نگه کردم با دیدگان خیره نگه کردم اما سکوت با سخنی نشکست جز با «لـِنور»، دخترک سرمست نامش چنان سرود غم انگیزی جاری شد، اندر آن شب پائیزی پر زد «لـِنور»، از لب من در دشت پژواک آن دوباره به من برگشت بی نام دوشیزه ی اینجا بود بی نام، سربسته و دیگر هیچ ... ا. شربیانی

  6. 5 out of 5

    Navessa

    Am I the only one creeped out by ravens? Every time I hear mention of them I shudder. I mean, come on. Have you ever heard one croak? Second question; have you ever heard a tree full of them croak? I have. There I was, minding my own business, just trying to walk home from the bus stop. I didn’t even see them until I was directly beneath the tree. I heard this strange rustling sound and thought it was weird because the leaves had already fallen. Naturally, I paused to look up. What was I met wit Am I the only one creeped out by ravens? Every time I hear mention of them I shudder. I mean, come on. Have you ever heard one croak? Second question; have you ever heard a tree full of them croak? I have. There I was, minding my own business, just trying to walk home from the bus stop. I didn’t even see them until I was directly beneath the tree. I heard this strange rustling sound and thought it was weird because the leaves had already fallen. Naturally, I paused to look up. What was I met with? Okay, maybe it wasn’t that dramatic but I was eleven and they were just up there…looking at me…with their beady little eyes…and their stabby little beaks. Then one opened its mouth and croaked. Then another joined in. Then another. I ran the rest of the way home. I was convinced that it was some kind of omen and I was going to die within 24 hours. My mom didn’t buy it. That heartless woman made me go to school. I spent the next day acting like some kind of little schizo, jumping at noises, slinking down hallways, screaming whenever a loud noise went off. What? I had an overactive imagination as a kid. Ravens still creep me out. Crows too. They hang out in groups called murders. They’re far too intelligent for comfort. It’s in the eyes, in the way they just…stare at you. *shudder* Did you know that they can count to five? One species even makes its own tools. And another…sorry, I’m getting off topic. I avoided reading this poem until I was in my twenties. I’d read all of his other works before I sucked it up and attempted this. It gave me nightmares. I suggest never reading Poe’s thoughts on this poem. It takes the magic away. His approach to writing it was too clinical, too structured. I like to ignore what he said about his method and picture him gaunt and disheveled, crouched over a piece of parchment and scribbling away like a madman. I’ll leave you with my favorite passage: “And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted – nevermore!” This review can also be found at The Book Eaters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. "'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door -- Only this, and nothing more." I had started reading the Raven before but was never able to quite get through it. When I came across this illustrated version at my library I decided to give it another shot. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. "'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door -- Only this, and nothing more." I had started reading the Raven before but was never able to quite get through it. When I came across this illustrated version at my library I decided to give it another shot. The illustrated version made it so much better. The illustrations by Ryan Price are dark and gritty… much like the story of the Raven. I’ve read several illustrated books this year that have added a certain something to the already great story (A Monster Calls comes immediately to mind) and the Raven is no exception. You can find a few more illustrations by Ryan Price from the book here but I would also recommend checking out the rest of his work here as well, although I must say I think his work in the Raven is my favorite.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Nevermore! RAISE RAVENS... First of all, two things... ...one, I classified this poem as a "short story" since I haven't read so much poetry as to justify a tag for that in my personal list to describe books... ...two, I rated 4 stars, since kinda the same reason, due I haven't developed a knack for poetry, but since I was curious about this poem by Edgar Allan Poe, still I read it, and certainly I liked it quite a bit, but it's some hard to enjoy for me poetry. Nobody's fault. This is easily one Nevermore! RAISE RAVENS... First of all, two things... ...one, I classified this poem as a "short story" since I haven't read so much poetry as to justify a tag for that in my personal list to describe books... ...two, I rated 4 stars, since kinda the same reason, due I haven't developed a knack for poetry, but since I was curious about this poem by Edgar Allan Poe, still I read it, and certainly I liked it quite a bit, but it's some hard to enjoy for me poetry. Nobody's fault. This is easily one of the most famous poems of all time and one of the masterpieces in the middle of Poe's works. And this edition has the plus of having the gorgeous illustrations by Gustave Doré (that I already knew about him thanks to "Pawn Stars" where another book illustrated by him was taken there). Funny thing is that most people think that a talking raven is a paranormal element, in an episode of "Doctor Who" (Capaldi's era) was shown ravens talking too as something unusual, but I watched a TV show in "Nat Geo Wild" where they informed that ravens indeed learn to "talk", much like parrots, repeating words that they heard. Ravens even do a "funeral" ceremony for those dead ravens that they find, reuniting for a moment around the fallen comrade. Amazing animals, the ravens are. In this captivating poem, a male character is mourning the loss of his lover, Lenore, and in the middle of his sorrow, a raven gets into the room, and while the bird only says "Nevermore", the male character manages to think that this raven is answering all his questions, not matter how diverse are. When you are in deep pain... ...you only hear what you want to hear... ...even if it makes you angry.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Samra Yusuf

    You know the place between sleep and wake, the place where you can still remember dreaming, it’s a worst place to be in when you no longer can sleep nor can dream.we,the humans are a doomed species who ever breathed on planet earth, the moments we cherish turns into memories, the things we desire become wishes, the people we love turns into strangers, and the present we live becomes past… We all live our dear life with a feel of loss, we all devise altered approaches to seek peace, we all at some You know the place between sleep and wake, the place where you can still remember dreaming, it’s a worst place to be in when you no longer can sleep nor can dream.we,the humans are a doomed species who ever breathed on planet earth, the moments we cherish turns into memories, the things we desire become wishes, the people we love turns into strangers, and the present we live becomes past… We all live our dear life with a feel of loss, we all devise altered approaches to seek peace, we all at some phase of our life are rendered alone in a crowd of people around us, we all want to be more understood than loved, we all want someone to hear us when our inner voice is too deafening to hear anything, we all have heard the tapping of something at our window, we all have called those at the past night who are no longer with us, and we’ve heard them answering to our call, talking to us in whispers, when the eyes sleep but heart beats in a relentless rhythm, we hear them,beacause we so want to.. Poe, has a distinct eminence in saying so much with so little words, One can virtually sense the drabness and the loneness he must have felt being alone in his study with barely a fire left and everything dark around him. It almost is letting you think he is completely lost in his own misery from his loss, the loss of his loved one, narrator in his sleep-wake state hears the tapping on window, and at first encounters nothing but darkness. Raven, can surely be the imagination of the narrator and so is the whole dialogue that proceeds, but using this bird only, has its own regard, Raven is a historical figure in bible, Norse mythology and other references, it symbolizes bad omen, thought and memory, death, darkness, wisdom and at times superiority, and we glimpse all the symbolism visualized through lines. Whatever caused the poet to die early, The Raven and its symbolism has to do with his psychosis…. and as he says: Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fernando

    ¡Y pensar que Edgar Allan Poe recibió tan sólo 10 dólares por su poema más famoso y uno de los más memorables en la historia de la literatura! Originalmente había pensado en llamarlo "The Parrot", pero la elección del cuervo le dio un lustre más oscuro de lúgubre desasosiego del yo lírico que declama la pérdida de su querida Lenore. La aliteración utilizada en el poema es única (como en el caso de su otro poema "The Bells"), y será eterno. Forevermore!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Florencia

    And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted—nevermore! Themes such as loss and relentless melancholy - nothing foreign to Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) - combined with a repetitive rhythm that gives it a unique and gradually oppressive musicality resulted in one of the best literary works of all time, The Raven. This edition, first published in 1844, includes the steel-plate engravings by renowned French artist Gustave Doré (1832–1883), who died shortly afte And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted—nevermore! Themes such as loss and relentless melancholy - nothing foreign to Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) - combined with a repetitive rhythm that gives it a unique and gradually oppressive musicality resulted in one of the best literary works of all time, The Raven. This edition, first published in 1844, includes the steel-plate engravings by renowned French artist Gustave Doré (1832–1883), who died shortly after completing the series. This is the second time I read Poe's masterpiece and it was an entirely different experience. After several poetry collections, I was able to appreciate his creative genius and connect with his words on another level, something I couldn't do many years ago. The following excerpt is part of the Introduction. In few words, Poe's haunting Raven was portrayed with utmost perfection. The Mirror's editor, Nathaniel P. Willis included a short preface to "The Raven", in which he wrote: In our opinion, it is the most effective single example of "fugitive poetry" ever published in this country, and unsurpassed in English poetry for subtle conception, masterly ingenuity of versification, and consistent sustaining of imaginative lift... July 23,18 * Later on my blog.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melki

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Look who’s tweeting now! Fear for fear’s sake - Delusions empowered! Heard it on The Scarecrow News last night. A tale of ominous foreboding. Tapping, rapping, something happening in the world, filling the soul with fear and worry. What happened last night in the barren field? The Scarecrow shouts it out: “Who would believe it? The ravens? We let many in, and it has caused problems we wouldn’t have thought possible!” But what happened? Rumours spread. Thousands and thousands of ravens attacked the Look who’s tweeting now! Fear for fear’s sake - Delusions empowered! Heard it on The Scarecrow News last night. A tale of ominous foreboding. Tapping, rapping, something happening in the world, filling the soul with fear and worry. What happened last night in the barren field? The Scarecrow shouts it out: “Who would believe it? The ravens? We let many in, and it has caused problems we wouldn’t have thought possible!” But what happened? Rumours spread. Thousands and thousands of ravens attacked the Scarecrow in the middle of the barren field? Checking the facts, the guardians of the field say: “’Tis the wind and nothing more!” But the wind? The wind can’t have done all that alone? (“All what?”, the croaking ravens ask. “Nothing happened last night in the barren field!”) “There must be more. Evermore! A Raven Field Massacre?” Rumours spread with every tweet, the more the twitter rises, the more it sounds familiar, and thus true. Tweeting in a circle of calculated fear.”Thousands and thousands of ravens attacked the Scarecrow in the middle of the barren field? Why did they do it? What for?” The birds are tweeting in reply: “Nothing happened, tell no lies, nevermore, nevermore!” And the Scarecrow scornful: “I have the freedom to tweet, just like the birds. Scarecrows have the right to claim their honest lies against the dishonest facts! I will tweet it out, evermore, evermore!” Ravens in fear, croaking and tapping, rapping and croaking: “Our food is gone, the earth is scorched, we can’t survive nevermore!” The Scarecrow yells: “See, they are violent, they are activists, we must protect our country from the ravens. They want to take our freedom away, our food, our jobs, our right to destroy their natural habitat!” “Let’s build a wall, with a roof, to shut them out. Then they can fly around in the air somewhere! Why should we care? Scarecrows first!” And Scarecrow News reports, the wall will pay for itself, it will protect the scarecrows, and make the barren field safe again. The croaking and tapping and rapping from the supporters of the ravens is just humbug, a staged fight. All the other birds love the scarecrow, and the scarecrow loves them. Voices mingle, louder and louder, croaking versus shouting, choking versus pouting: “But nothing will grow on the barren field: Nevermore!” “And the Scarecrow is unharmed, surely that is proof that the ravens did not attack it?” But the Scarecrow News knows better. “If the Scarecrow says something happened in the barren field last night, then it did, regardless of whether there is any proof or not. You have to skip the sources, and go straight to truth! The raven supporters are the enemy of the entire scarecrow nation! And of all the honest birds as well! Their call for free flight for all is disgusting and sad! So sad!” The Scarecrow promises: “Let’s make the scarecrows great again!” The ravens around the world remember, tapping, rapping, croaking: “We have heard that before! And people said: Nevermore!” And the ravens continue croaking, sometimes joking, always reminding the scarecrows of the real nightmare, the one with the ravens robbed of their rightful place in the community of living things, not the made-up story of the ravens attacking the scarecrow. It didn’t happen last night in the barren field! Why would ravens want to go there anyway? No food, no security, people shooting at them, a ridiculous Scarecrow swaggering in the middle of it all? But the Scarecrow has no peace: “But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling, Straight I built the greatest wall in front of bird, and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore— What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking “Nevermore.” And the ravens keep croaking! It is the scarecrow that is a fake - scary but hollow! Hollow but threatening, dangerous in its hollowness! In a barren field of fear, history repeats itself. But the ravens croak, louder and louder. … Nevermore, nevermore, nevermore ...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Luciana Gomez Mauro

    Fue mi primera experiencia con un audiolibro de este libro. Y fue espectacular, me hizo hasta temblar con ese maldito cuervo. Tan corto y sencillo, pero buenísimo.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jaya

    So what do you do when you can’t sleep even the clock tell you its 2’o clock of the night? You creep yourself out by reading creepy poems where a Raven talks back to you, saying ...Nevermore... Still can’t sleep? Listen to this rendition. (It mostly scares the daylights out of me) Here are two of my most favorite passages, which I could once, long time back, in another lifetime, recite by rote Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no morta So what do you do when you can’t sleep even the clock tell you its 2’o clock of the night? You creep yourself out by reading creepy poems where a Raven talks back to you, saying ...Nevermore... Still can’t sleep? Listen to this rendition. (It mostly scares the daylights out of me) Here are two of my most favorite passages, which I could once, long time back, in another lifetime, recite by rote Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore?" This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" — Merely this, and nothing more. And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted- nevermore!” P.S: this usually manages to throw me into throes of despondency

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rinda Elwakil

    Eagerly I wished the morrow.. Vainly I had sought to borrow.. From my books surcease of sorrow,sorrow for the lost Lenore.. For the rare and madien whom the angels named "Lenore".. Nameless here for evermore.. خسارة تتبعها خسارة تتبعها خسارة..تلك كانت حياة ذاك الرجل..إدجار آلان بو. عاش منبوذاً كسيراً سكيراً، سلبه الموت حب حياته مرتين.. رحل ادجار آلان بو عن عالمنا مُفلساً وحيداً لا يعرفه أحد، و لم يشهد تقديراً كافياً لابداعه خلال حياته..ماتت حبيبته آنابيل لي جراء السُل أمام عينيه و لم يملك شيئا يمنحه ل Eagerly I wished the morrow.. Vainly I had sought to borrow.. From my books surcease of sorrow,sorrow for the lost Lenore.. For the rare and madien whom the angels named "Lenore".. Nameless here for evermore.. خسارة تتبعها خسارة تتبعها خسارة..تلك كانت حياة ذاك الرجل..إدجار آلان بو. عاش منبوذاً كسيراً سكيراً، سلبه الموت حب حياته مرتين.. رحل ادجار آلان بو عن عالمنا مُفلساً وحيداً لا يعرفه أحد، و لم يشهد تقديراً كافياً لابداعه خلال حياته..ماتت حبيبته آنابيل لي جراء السُل أمام عينيه و لم يملك شيئا يمنحه لها سوي قلباً دافئاً و قطاً يرجوه أن يجلس قليلاً علي قدميها الحبيبتين ليمنحهما بعض الدفء.. And the raven,never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door.. And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming.. And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor.. And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor, Shall be lifted..nevermore. جسّد العظيم جون كوزاك شخصيته ك تكريم لذكراه في فيلم رائع باسم القصيدة.. The raven. القصيدة كاملة منطوقة.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BefliM... أُرشحهما معاً، القصيدة من أفضل ما قرأت له و الفيلم يستحق المشاهدة :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I love this book. If I were going to buy a pop-up, this would be the first one, or Alice in Wonderland. Hard call there. This book is a work of gothic art! Amazing. Seriously, it is so beautiful. Goodreads has grouped this with the regular poem, it appears, but this book is specifically a pop-up book engineered by Christopher Wormell. The isbn is: 9781419721977. It should be listed separately from the poem as this is something different. I stopped by the children’s reading room at the Library of I love this book. If I were going to buy a pop-up, this would be the first one, or Alice in Wonderland. Hard call there. This book is a work of gothic art! Amazing. Seriously, it is so beautiful. Goodreads has grouped this with the regular poem, it appears, but this book is specifically a pop-up book engineered by Christopher Wormell. The isbn is: 9781419721977. It should be listed separately from the poem as this is something different. I stopped by the children’s reading room at the Library of Congress when I’m there and I read a few pop-up books while I’m there. They have an amazing collection of them. Beautiful stark black pop-ups with the color on the man at the desk really popping. I love when he opens the window and the Raven is sitting there. The whole poem is told in little flaps you open. A fantastic story. I love this poem, and I love the fantastic artwork and I love this book. I’m such a fan!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,  Soon again I heard a tapping something louder than before WoW! What a poem it is!! I am not into poems that much but this poem is exceptionally awesome. I couldn't stop reading this. I have read this poem at least 3 times by now. It's just that amazing. Once you started, you couldn't be able to stop until the end. I have fallen in love with this poem of E. A. Poe. Madly!! I have even downloaded its audio version. And that's also real Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,  Soon again I heard a tapping something louder than before WoW! What a poem it is!! I am not into poems that much but this poem is exceptionally awesome. I couldn't stop reading this. I have read this poem at least 3 times by now. It's just that amazing. Once you started, you couldn't be able to stop until the end. I have fallen in love with this poem of E. A. Poe. Madly!! I have even downloaded its audio version. And that's also really great. I will not be spoiling any part of it. I would highly recommend this poem. It's just a five minutes read guys! Go head! Read it! https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem... Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,  Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;      But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,      And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”  This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—              Merely this and nothing more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    I'm not big fan of poetry but I really loved this one. Maybe it's because I listened to version read by Christopher Lee (you can find it on youtube), and it's universal rule that everything is better when heard in voice of Christopher Lee, but this is my favorite work of Poe so far.

  21. 4 out of 5

    AleJandra

    La primera vez que leí esta historia fue hace 12 años aproximadamente. En aquel entonces era una pobre diabla puberta que empezaba a leer por placer y no obligación, y siguiendo lo pretenciosa que era yo en aquel entonces leía puros clásicos, en especial de terror. Y este fue el primer cuento que leí de Edgar Allan Poe, no recuerdo bien que sentí o pensé aquella primera vez que lo leí Probablemente nisiquiera lo entendí o lo interprete de una manera súper alucinada. El punto es que siempre e con La primera vez que leí esta historia fue hace 12 años aproximadamente. En aquel entonces era una pobre diabla puberta que empezaba a leer por placer y no obligación, y siguiendo lo pretenciosa que era yo en aquel entonces leía puros clásicos, en especial de terror. Y este fue el primer cuento que leí de Edgar Allan Poe, no recuerdo bien que sentí o pensé aquella primera vez que lo leí Probablemente nisiquiera lo entendí o lo interprete de una manera súper alucinada. El punto es que siempre e considerado a Edgar Allan Poe como mi escritor clásico favorito, y como tal tenía muchas ganas de releer sus obras, pero ahora en ingles. Lo cual me costo un poco de tiempo. Para los que leen en ingles y este no es su idioma principal me entenderán. Por que es muy fácil leer un libro contemporáneo, donde se utilizan frases coloquiales y populismos que nos son familiares, ya sea porque los hemos escuchado en alguna canción o visto en la televisión. Pero leer un libro en ingles clásico es un reto mas difícil de lo que me imaginaba, creo que por eso mismo me siento tan orgullosa en este momento de haberlo logrado. Es como haber leído algo completamente nuevo, no solo por lo diferente que soy a aquella primera vez que lo leí, si no por toda las hermosura que cada palabra transmite, sin el cambio de idioma, leyendo exactamente lo que el escritor visualizaba. Sentir ese escalofrió con cada "Nevermore" En conclusión: Leer esta pequeña historia me hizo reafirmar el porque amo tanto el dark romance, y por que me gusta tanto Edgar Allan Poe, y ser capaz de leer y entender sus obras en ingles será difícil, pero lo valdrá. "Dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before"

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peter Meredith

    I write this review as someone who dislikes poetry, or maybe I should say, before I'm attacked by the poetry police, that I have disliked every poem forced down my throat by well meaning sadistic teachers. (Someone please explain the antithetical concept of a well meaning sadist. I'm afraid I might have made that up and it makes no sense.) The Raven I enjoyed. Perhaps because of its length. For me, a poem can't be too long. The longer the poem, the higher my risk of death(probably through suicide I write this review as someone who dislikes poetry, or maybe I should say, before I'm attacked by the poetry police, that I have disliked every poem forced down my throat by well meaning sadistic teachers. (Someone please explain the antithetical concept of a well meaning sadist. I'm afraid I might have made that up and it makes no sense.) The Raven I enjoyed. Perhaps because of its length. For me, a poem can't be too long. The longer the poem, the higher my risk of death(probably through suicide) before I might finish it. Nor can a poem be too short. I know a lot of you out there think, the shorter the better when it comes to poetry, but a short poem is just a waste. The author should have put the time into a dirty limerick instead. Either way, the length of the Raven was, as Goldilocks was so fond of saying, just right. It told it's story and no more. The story itself was good. Poems are a difficult medium for horror, but Poe had me hooked quickly, wondering what it was tapping or rapping on his chamber door. Though it might have been better if the Raven had razor sharp talons instead of just dreadful insinuations with its 'Nevermore' The best part of the Raven for me, the poetry novice, was the clever verbiage matched with the more clever rhyming scheme. You would think that since this was the best poem I've ever read that I would give it five stars, but it was still a poem and likely never to be read by me again...four stars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Athena ღ

    Απίστευτο! Με έπιασε δέος διαβάζοντας το!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nick Pageant

    I read this yesterday for probably the 150th time and want to say thanks to dear old Edgar. I teach therapeutic writing to some quite reluctant students. They literally groan when they see me coming. Each class I struggle to find material that they will relate to in some small way. I chose this standard out of equal parts desperation and resignation... and it worked. Eyes lit up! Comments were made! Unity of effect in good poetry was discussed! Thank you, Edgar Allan Poe, you saved my butt. As t I read this yesterday for probably the 150th time and want to say thanks to dear old Edgar. I teach therapeutic writing to some quite reluctant students. They literally groan when they see me coming. Each class I struggle to find material that they will relate to in some small way. I chose this standard out of equal parts desperation and resignation... and it worked. Eyes lit up! Comments were made! Unity of effect in good poetry was discussed! Thank you, Edgar Allan Poe, you saved my butt. As to the poem itself, I don't know that it's particularly great, but it is perfect. Can a thing be not-great and perfect at the same time? Yes. Because I say so.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Death and SorrowA tragic and creepy poem about a RAVEN who hauntingly appears as a (spirit?) 'rapping' on a man's door who is distraught over the loss of his love Lenore. (or did the man murder Lenore and the Raven came to collect his soul?)The last verse: "And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor-------Shall be lifted Nevermore".

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    Wonderful art captures the impending doom that permeates this poem - listen to Christopher Lee recite this poem on YouTube as you turn the pages...SENDS SHIVERS DOWN MY SPINE!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    The most well-known poem of the author. Its publication in 1845 would offer him, after some time, considerable fame. The Crow is enjoyed almost as much for its rhythmical beauty as for the interest resulting from the publication of the philosophy of the composition; text in which Poe explains and gives detail to the moments prior to, and, which culminate in the poem. For the moment, as for either the discord or acceptance of the author's affirmations, it is clear that it is more beneficial to en The most well-known poem of the author. Its publication in 1845 would offer him, after some time, considerable fame. The Crow is enjoyed almost as much for its rhythmical beauty as for the interest resulting from the publication of the philosophy of the composition; text in which Poe explains and gives detail to the moments prior to, and, which culminate in the poem. For the moment, as for either the discord or acceptance of the author's affirmations, it is clear that it is more beneficial to enjoy each line of the work instead of hastily entering one's opinion or making a show of one's literary knowledge. Like the Greeks, Poe also attempted to marry the genres of the fantasy and the human tragedy. However, he felt it unnecessary to give life to gods and demi-gods to reach this goal. According to Poe, the tragedy and the fantastic had always been of the same world. One doesn't have to go far to come close to the fantastic. A crow and a chorus/refrain would be sufficient for Poe to make this revelation. Never again, are the only words repeated by the crow, a bird that arrives while those suffering the loss of a young woman grieve. It all takes place in one room. There is no need for another space. Only just a few elements are sufficient. The crow, a bust of Palas, the Man and his tragedy, give life to this poem. Poe needed nothing more. Perhaps this is what is attractive about. The Crow. A short work, of few elements, but which contains a desolation that produces a melancholic effect in the soul that surpasses any literary or artistic expectation. Today, The Crow, more than being seen as the consolidation of a literary style, or a poetic writing technique, should be contemplated as one of many illusions which, during our history, has survived the intellect and recuperated its artistic condition, a magic condition of which, we hope, it will never again escape.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    "Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before." One of the most hauntingly beautiful, and influential, poems of our time, The Raven was the first work I read by Edgar Allan Poe, the first time many, many years ago. It’s stayed with me since then, most solidly in the form of the audio narration by the late Christopher Lee (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Befli...). If you haven't listened to this piece of ar "Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before." One of the most hauntingly beautiful, and influential, poems of our time, The Raven was the first work I read by Edgar Allan Poe, the first time many, many years ago. It’s stayed with me since then, most solidly in the form of the audio narration by the late Christopher Lee (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Befli...). If you haven't listened to this piece of art, I'd recommend doing so right now.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sh3lly

    I think my Classics Stupid™ mind kicked in with this one, because... it was ... okay? But Nevermore is a bad-ass name for a raven. I found out Poe married his first cousin and she was 13 and he was 27. That's creepy. However, no one can seem to agree whether they even consummated the marriage. It is clear they loved each other, but whether it was a sexually romantic love is unclear?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mia (Parentheses Enthusiast)

    I've read this so many times I've lost count, but I still adore it. The imagery, the creepiness, the frenetic cadence it takes on when read aloud... Pure awesomeness. I try to read it every Halloween.

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