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Andersen's Fairy Tales The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Snow Queen, The Real Princess and a host of other wonderful tales which form so much a part of childhood are part of Andersen's Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen. This volume contains eighteen selected stories. Some of them are old familiar friends, while others maybe new to some readers, but all of th Andersen's Fairy Tales The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Snow Queen, The Real Princess and a host of other wonderful tales which form so much a part of childhood are part of Andersen's Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen. This volume contains eighteen selected stories. Some of them are old familiar friends, while others maybe new to some readers, but all of them equally enchanting and enthralling. Today, these stories are known almost everywhere in the world and have been translated into hundreds of languages. Their appeal is not just for children or young readers. As folktales and typical Scandinavian legends, they are a fascinating glimpse into the myths and legends, culture and ethos of the Northern Lands. Since their publication in 1835, they have continued to inspire and delight generations of children and adults. Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author whose work included plays, poetry, travelogues, novels and stories. Born in a noble Danish family, he was inspired to transcribe the tales he had heard as a child from people around him. The stories he selected were interesting, imaginative and unique. Some of them like The Little Mermaid were poignant and were not strictly just for a young audience. In fact, the story went on to capture public imagination to such an extent that today one of the most iconic monuments of Copenhagen is the statue of the Little Mermaid on the Langeline Promenade, which draws thousands of visitors every year. Andersen's first foray into writing fairytales did not meet with much success because translating them from the original Danish was quite difficult and it had only restricted readership. However, in 1845, he reached out to the rest of the world through a brilliant translation of The Little Mermaid in Bentley's Miscellany magazine. Great success followed as his stories began appearing in various English magazines and journals and a whole generation of young English speaking children discovered the treasures of Scandinavia. The stories have continued to enthrall people in many fields. Music, opera, art, literature, drama, film and television have become richer by the addition of various versions of Andersen's tales and his name has become a byword for the genre. He also inspired hundreds of other writers to come out with folktales and stories designed to captivate the imagination of young and old. Stories like The Tinder-Box convey a feeling of mystery and awe, while The Nightingale provides pathos and beauty. As an invaluable addition to any library shelf, Andersen's Fairy Tales can provide hours of reading pleasure to both young and old. A Novel BONUS! - Includes Download a FREE Audio Books Inside (Classic Book Collection) Audiobooks Made Easy. - Enjoy books in a whole new way. Great narrators make a story come alive. - Be more productive. Transform you commute, workout or chores into listening time. - Listen anytime, anywhere. Listen on your ipod, laptop, smartphone or tablet. Listen in your car, on a run, in the office, in the gym... BONUS! - Included Exclusive Collection of FREE Audio Books Downloads in MP3 Format Inside. You get all these Bonuses just for taking action today..... It's our way of saying "thanking you" Click the "Add to Cart" button to start your reading journey RISK FREE!


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Andersen's Fairy Tales The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Snow Queen, The Real Princess and a host of other wonderful tales which form so much a part of childhood are part of Andersen's Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen. This volume contains eighteen selected stories. Some of them are old familiar friends, while others maybe new to some readers, but all of th Andersen's Fairy Tales The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Snow Queen, The Real Princess and a host of other wonderful tales which form so much a part of childhood are part of Andersen's Fairy Tales, by Hans Christian Andersen. This volume contains eighteen selected stories. Some of them are old familiar friends, while others maybe new to some readers, but all of them equally enchanting and enthralling. Today, these stories are known almost everywhere in the world and have been translated into hundreds of languages. Their appeal is not just for children or young readers. As folktales and typical Scandinavian legends, they are a fascinating glimpse into the myths and legends, culture and ethos of the Northern Lands. Since their publication in 1835, they have continued to inspire and delight generations of children and adults. Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author whose work included plays, poetry, travelogues, novels and stories. Born in a noble Danish family, he was inspired to transcribe the tales he had heard as a child from people around him. The stories he selected were interesting, imaginative and unique. Some of them like The Little Mermaid were poignant and were not strictly just for a young audience. In fact, the story went on to capture public imagination to such an extent that today one of the most iconic monuments of Copenhagen is the statue of the Little Mermaid on the Langeline Promenade, which draws thousands of visitors every year. Andersen's first foray into writing fairytales did not meet with much success because translating them from the original Danish was quite difficult and it had only restricted readership. However, in 1845, he reached out to the rest of the world through a brilliant translation of The Little Mermaid in Bentley's Miscellany magazine. Great success followed as his stories began appearing in various English magazines and journals and a whole generation of young English speaking children discovered the treasures of Scandinavia. The stories have continued to enthrall people in many fields. Music, opera, art, literature, drama, film and television have become richer by the addition of various versions of Andersen's tales and his name has become a byword for the genre. He also inspired hundreds of other writers to come out with folktales and stories designed to captivate the imagination of young and old. Stories like The Tinder-Box convey a feeling of mystery and awe, while The Nightingale provides pathos and beauty. As an invaluable addition to any library shelf, Andersen's Fairy Tales can provide hours of reading pleasure to both young and old. A Novel BONUS! - Includes Download a FREE Audio Books Inside (Classic Book Collection) Audiobooks Made Easy. - Enjoy books in a whole new way. Great narrators make a story come alive. - Be more productive. Transform you commute, workout or chores into listening time. - Listen anytime, anywhere. Listen on your ipod, laptop, smartphone or tablet. Listen in your car, on a run, in the office, in the gym... BONUS! - Included Exclusive Collection of FREE Audio Books Downloads in MP3 Format Inside. You get all these Bonuses just for taking action today..... It's our way of saying "thanking you" Click the "Add to Cart" button to start your reading journey RISK FREE!

30 review for Andersen's Fairy Tales: A Novel Bonus! - Includes Download a Free Audio Books Inside (Classic Book Collection)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Complete Fairy Tales: The complete collection, Hans Christian Andersen Hans Christian Andersen often referred to in Scandinavia as H. C. Andersen, (2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875) was a Danish author. All the best-loved fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen: The Tinder-Box; Little Claus And Big Claus; The Princess And The Pea; Little Ida’s Flowers; Little Tiny Or Thumbelina; The Saucy Boy; The Travelling Companion; The Little Mermaid; The Emperor’s New Suit; The Goloshes Of Fortune; The Daisy; The Complete Fairy Tales: The complete collection, Hans Christian Andersen Hans Christian Andersen often referred to in Scandinavia as H. C. Andersen, (2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875) was a Danish author. All the best-loved fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen: The Tinder-Box; Little Claus And Big Claus; The Princess And The Pea; Little Ida’s Flowers; Little Tiny Or Thumbelina; The Saucy Boy; The Travelling Companion; The Little Mermaid; The Emperor’s New Suit; The Goloshes Of Fortune; The Daisy; The Brave Tin Soldier; The Wild Swans; The Garden Of Paradise; The Flying Trunk; The Storks; The Elf Of The Rose; What The Moon Saw; The Wicked Prince; The Metal Pig; The Shepherd’s Story Of The Bond Of Friendship; A Rose From Homer’s Grave; The Buckwheat; Ole-Luk-Oie, The Dream-God; The Swineherd; The Angel; The Nightingale; The Ugly Duckling; The Top And Ball; The Fir Tree; The Snow Queen; The Little Elder-Tree Mother; The Elfin Hill; The Red Shoes; The Jumper; The Shepherdess And The Sweep; Holger Danske; The Bell; Grandmother; The Darning-Needle; The Little Match-Seller; The Sunbeam And The Captive; By The Almshouse Window; The Old Street Lamp; The Neighbouring Families; Little Tuk; The Shadow; The Old House; The Drop Of Water; The Happy Family; The Story Of A Mother; The Shirt-Collar; The Flax; The Phoenix Bird; A Story; The Puppet-Show Man; The Dumb Book; The Old Grave-Stone; The Conceited Apple-Branch; The Loveliest Rose In The World; In A Thousand Years; The Swan’s Nest; The Story Of The Year; There Is No Doubt About It; A Cheerful Temper; A Great Grief; Everything In The Right Place; The Goblin And The Huckster; Under The Willow-Tree; The Pea Blossom; She Was Good For Nothing; The Last Pearl; Two Maidens; In The Uttermost Parts Of The Sea; The Money-Box; A Leaf From Heaven; Jack The Dullard; Ib And Little Christina; The Thorny Road Of Honor; The Jewish Maiden; The Bell-Deep; The Bottle Neck; Soup From A Sausage Skewer; The Old Bachelor’s Nightcap; Something; The Last Dream Of The Old Oak; The Marsh King’s Daughter; The Races; The Philosopher’s Stone; The Story Of The Wind; The Girl Who Trod On The Loaf; Ole The Tower-Keeper; Anne Lisbeth; Children’s Prattle; The Child In The Grave; Two Brothers; The Pen And The Inkstand; The Farm-Yard Cock And The Weathercock; Beauty Of Form And Beauty Of Mind; A Story From The Sand-Hills; The Butterfly; The Bishop Of B0rglum And His Warriors; The Mail-Coach Passengers; The Beetle Who Went On His Travels; What The Old Man Does Is Always Right; The Snow Man; The Portuguese Duck; The Ice Maiden; The Psyche; The Snail And The Rose-Tree; The Old Church Bell; The Silver Shilling; The Snowdrop; The Bird Of Popular Song; The Will-O’-The-Wisp Is In The Town, Says The Moor-Woman; The Windmill; In The Nursery; The Golden Treasure; The Storm Shakes The Shield; Delaying Is Not Forgetting; The Porter’s Son; and more Others!!!!! تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و هشتم ماه سپتامبر سال 2013 میلادی عنوان: مجموعه قصه های پریان: چهار جلدی؛ نویسنذه: هانس کریستین اندرسون؛ مترجم: جمشید نوایی؛ تهران، نگاه، 1384؛ در چهار جلد، در 1470 ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان دانمارکی - سده 19 م ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to The Complete Fairy Tales, written in 1835 by Hans Christian Andersen. Many people are familiar with the fairy tales written by the Grimm brothers, but sometimes don't realize there were several different versions or collections by different authors. Another popular one is the series written by Hans Christian Anderson. The two I was the most familiar with were "The Ugly Duckling" and "The Emperor's New Clothes." In both, you see some of the "horror" that you see Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to The Complete Fairy Tales, written in 1835 by Hans Christian Andersen. Many people are familiar with the fairy tales written by the Grimm brothers, but sometimes don't realize there were several different versions or collections by different authors. Another popular one is the series written by Hans Christian Anderson. The two I was the most familiar with were "The Ugly Duckling" and "The Emperor's New Clothes." In both, you see some of the "horror" that you see from other classic fairy tales, but these are more about reality and real-life situations that could occur. Also, they don't always end up a positive note. A few movies have been made from them, and countless cartoons and TV shows. I enjoyed some of them, but not all of them. I do think they are worth a read, as they provide some insight into the goings-on of a working mind nearly 200 years ago. It's true-to-form stories that have a basis in moral lessons versus coming-of-age sentiments. Both are valuable, but they are a bit different. Not quite for young children, probably better for pre-teens or teenagers. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pouting Always

    Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all. Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to. I just can't get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor's daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all. Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to. I just can't get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor's daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically leaves her homeless because that's what she deserves for rejecting an honest prince, or when the guy who journey's with the other guy beats the princess while following her and she thinks its a hail storm. I could go on and on. I literally did not get anything constructive from reading any of the stories and only finished reading the book because I have this compulsive need to finish a book once I start it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    If you want to read the real stories that inspired the lion's share of Disney films, definitely read Mr. Andersen's collection of fairy tales. Do not expect happy endings however - leave those to Walt&Co. Instead imagine families trying to scare their kids into behaving in order to survive the many dangers in this world - represented fantastically by witches and wolves and other beasties and meanies. A wonderful collection!

  5. 5 out of 5

    ♔ Jaela ♊ Killer ⚔ QUEEN

    Although some of the tales are really disturbing, the fantasy and imagination behind them is indisputable. I grew up reading this book and I'm sure it'll be valuable for all future generations.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eldonfoil TH*E Whatever Champion

    Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans. If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I'll forget about him from here on out. What is most generally striking/perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned. I don't think it's just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that senses more darkness than light. “Yes, every year the trees have new, fr Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans. If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I'll forget about him from here on out. What is most generally striking/perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned. I don't think it's just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that senses more darkness than light. “Yes, every year the trees have new, fresh leaves, but that is not true of the human heart.” (From a Window in Vartov) HCA desperately wants and loves beauty, yearns for music and poetry and life and innocence, and so we get this at the center of so many of his tales, but at the same time it is mostly apparent that these ideals are but dreams that we must continually reach for, work for, cherish when they sparingly come, because what this world is really filled with is darkness. He seems to say, feel both beauty and evil, know them both, accept them both, but my heart pains that the former will never have the upper hand. Throughout his tales I find his dreamy poetics are amazingly served with a shimmering personal touch; they are not distant, community-built folktales. There are also wonderful juxtapositions, magical paradoxes, and a communicative simplicity that can travel, like a drop in the lake, as deeply as the reader wishes to take things. At the same time, there are many stories of a different breed which will never make it to Disney. Stories like Two Virgins/Two Maidens, In the Duck Yard, and The Cock and the Weathercock dish out satire as sharp as any I've ever encountered. Sharp not only in its depth of understanding, but also in both heavy-handedness and bitterness. Word play, symbolism, and connections in these stories are as far from innocence and naivete as you will find. Other not so well-known stories such as A Drop of Water and The Shadow are probably my favorites so far. Both are extremely intense and particularly revelatory regarding how HCA views human behavior and human nature. Very direct, dark and twisted, but done in unique and colorful ways, they continue to show that HCA was not a simple children's man or the one-trick pony that permeates much of his recognition. And at some point, I don’t recall exactly when, I began to think a lot of Kafka while reading HCA. What are the connections? In a time when the construction of myths and fairy tales is practically extinct, when even the originals are mostly watered down and considered antiquated, Mr. Andersen delivered his most pleasant winds not so long ago and they stretch back to not only the earliest of human experience, but also connect just as strongly to us sensitives amongst moderns. This is a tome to keep bedside, never finishing, never repeating.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    You should call things by their true names, and even if you don't do so usually, you ought to in a fairy tale. --HCA, "The Rose-Tree Regiment" I enjoyed most the first section, from The Sandman, a series of pleasant dreams for good children. I'll have to read it in full some time. As for the rest, they were mostly better-known Andersen tales, all of which I had read before, some even previously illustrated by Zwerger as stand-alone picture books. So, nice illustrations, big text blocks, familiar You should call things by their true names, and even if you don't do so usually, you ought to in a fairy tale. --HCA, "The Rose-Tree Regiment" I enjoyed most the first section, from The Sandman, a series of pleasant dreams for good children. I'll have to read it in full some time. As for the rest, they were mostly better-known Andersen tales, all of which I had read before, some even previously illustrated by Zwerger as stand-alone picture books. So, nice illustrations, big text blocks, familiar stories. Nothing to wrote home about unless you've not read them before. My favorite was from Thumbelina, because doesn't the flower fairy prince totally look like a douche trying to make it with some innocent teen?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Hans Christian Andersen once said, "Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale." And his life certainly was an extraordinary rags to riches story. In all Hans Christian Andersen wrote 156 fairy tales, of which forty are in this luxury, large format edition, to represent the cream of the crop. It is a beautiful, sumptuous book, the semi-matt purple cover slightly textured and embossed, giving almost a "padded" feel. It has a feature reminiscent of medallions in old books; in this case an inset Hans Christian Andersen once said, "Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale." And his life certainly was an extraordinary rags to riches story. In all Hans Christian Andersen wrote 156 fairy tales, of which forty are in this luxury, large format edition, to represent the cream of the crop. It is a beautiful, sumptuous book, the semi-matt purple cover slightly textured and embossed, giving almost a "padded" feel. It has a feature reminiscent of medallions in old books; in this case an inset glossy illustration of a mermaid. The paper throughout is glossy, and most pages are bordered with patterns and old gold surrounds. Three gold colours are used; the spine is a slightly brighter gold, and the page edges are shiny and gilt-edged, plus there is a gold ribbon bookmark attached. There is an interesting introduction by the translator, Neil Philip, plus copious, carefully drawn illustrations by Isabelle Brent. These are mostly in gouache, and the illustrator makes much use of jewel colours, patterning and many magnificent gold highlights. It is a book which simply begs to be picked up. The choice of purple and gold is perhaps significant, since it is clear that Hans Christian Andersen believed himself to be a member of the royal family. Not only that, but he tortured himself with the belief that he was unacknowledged royalty, who had been cast out, and this conviction plagued him all his life. Interestingly, although there will probably never be any proof of Hans Christian Andersen's true birth, it is not simply an idle dream, but a genuine possibility. Hans Christian Andersen may have been the illegitimate son of Crown Prince Christian Frederik, later Christian VIII, and the teenage countess Elise Ahlefeldt-Laurvig. He was born in 1805 at Broholm Castle near Odense. Both Hans Christian Andersen's official parents worked at the castle, his "mother" as a nursemaid, and his "father", a cobbler for the family. There had also been a precedent for an illegitimate daughter (Fanny) to have been adopted by another servant of the Royal family a year earlier. Hans Christian Andersen seems to have had a privileged position with this family. Rather than play with the other poor children, he was allowed to play with Prince Christian Frederik's son, Prince Fritz, who was three years younger than him. When this prince later died, Hans Christian Andersen was the only person, not in the family, who was allowed to view the body privately. When he was seven years of age, Hans Christian Andersen's official father was paid to serve in the Napoleonic wars, in place of a local landowner. He returned four years later, a broken man, and died in the Spring. Hans's mother was now destitute, with few choices as she was illiterate, so she took in washing, standing waist deep for hours in the icy river, trying to stay warm by taking nips of schnapps. Two years later she married another shoemaker, who took no interest in the young Hans. Hence Hans Christian Andersen grew up in heartbreaking poverty, and all his life remained self-conscious about his lower class background, despite his success. Perhaps it is because he was born poor that he was obsessed with social class, and always trying to claw his way to the top. He seemed to both worship the nobility but also resent them for holding him at arm's length. He was of course dependent on the patronage of the wealthy to create his art. Whatever the cause, Hans Christian Andersen's stories portray everyone from invented royalty, to the truly destitute. He believed, "Every man's life is a fairy tale written by God's fingers." Hans Christian Andersen was awkward and earnest; gawky, ill-at-ease, and always feeling he was picked on by all and sundry. Many of his protagonists are obvious depictions of himself; caring a lot what other people thought of them and worried about fitting in. "The Emperor's New Clothes" and "The Ugly Duckling" are clear examples. Yet even battling all his worries, Hans Christian Andersen managed to find his voice and write his stories. In many of his stories he seems to explore ideas about wealth, self-worth, and the meaning of life. Many other aspects of the author's life feed into his stories, which were quite an eye-opener to read. If you think that he wrote "nice" stories for children, then perhaps think again. Some of them are very dark in tone, and most are quite depressing. He has been called a "poet of human suffering". Story after story ends in rejection, humiliation or disappointment. Many of the stories feature a downtrodden protagonist. Sometimes the main character will work hard, and then have a wonderful "fairytale" ending. Perhaps they are lucky, becoming rich, or famous, or falling in love, or a combination of these. Sometimes our downtrodden protagonist works hard, and is just about to achieve fulfilment in one of these ways ... but then suddenly dies for no particular reason. Sometimes there is no change at all, and the downtrodden protagonist remains downtrodden. (And then probably dies.) The downtrodden protagonist is not always "he". Sometimes it is a "she". Or equally often it may be a household object, or a flower, a tree, or an animal. Hans Christian Andersen's stories are fantasies, like dreams or visions. The object or creature will have a personality of its own, often showing a boastful or arrogant side; it will talk to other creatures or objects ... and then die. Sometimes the story does not even seem to be a moral fable; perhaps the object does not seem to have a bad side (but it will probably die nonetheless). His stories often feature children—usually a perfect vision of children who are like miniature adults doing various good things. Sometimes they die too. Sometimes the protagonists do not themselves die, but lose a loved one, and must accept that God is in charge of everything—even when they do not understand the reason. And in this way, through every single story, there seems to be a common thread. Hans Christian Andersen's tales are full of ideas about God, angels, faith, the Bible, the afterlife, and sin. He constantly reflects on what it takes to get into heaven, the various wicked things people do, and the nature of God, love, and forgiveness. Considering that the author himself said the stories were for children, it seems remarkable that they are so preoccupied with the darker side of being human. People sin, he says, and darkness often lives in our hearts and souls. He clearly thinks that all humans are sinners and should live in fear of God, but he also keeps reinforcing the redemptive power of love and faith. Many of Hans Christian Andersen's stories end up with the characters in heaven. Although not exactly a Catholic, his views and expressed beliefs certainly inclined that way. Hans Christian Andersen did not start out by writing fairy tales, although that is what we remember him for. Even as a child he had artistic leanings, becoming swept up by the "Tales from the Arabian Nights" which his father told him, and the toy theatre his father had made. The young Hans played with this, and made clothes for his dolls, dreaming of becoming an actor, a singer or a dancer. After his father died he left home to seek his fortune in Copenhagen, committed to an artistic life. He attached himself to various well-to-do families, successfully courted the attention of wealthy and influential people, one after another, and even had his fees at the Ballet School of the Royal Theatre paid. However this attendance was a short-lived experience. His teachers there crushed him by saying that he "lacked both the appearance and the talent necessary for the stage." Hans Christian Andersen was incredibly sensitive to slights all his life. Every cruel remark, or casual, careless comment would be taken to heart and never forgotten. So his wealthy patrons transferred their money to educating him at a private school for gentlemen. But he found this experience a torment too, saying, "it will destroy my soul". It led to him writing a sentimental, maudlin poem called "The Dying Child". But with a stroke of luck, the poem was published in the newspaper "The Copenhagen Post" in 1827, and the young man's future was assured. Hans Christian Andersen's first writing projects included a play, a book of poetry and a travelogue. The promising young author then won a grant from the king, and this enabled him to travel across Europe and work on being an author. He wrote a novel about his time in Italy, which was published in 1835, the same year as he began writing his stories—called "eventyr", or "fairy tales"—and often based on ideas from folk tales that he had heard or read as a child. Another of his preoccupations was to try out new places. He had a wanderlust, and an urge to flee from what he considered to be provincial life. There are echoes of this in his works. In "Five Peas in the Same Pod" all the peas are happy until one needs to explore the world outside. In "The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep", the couple brave all kinds of adventures, in search of something better. There are many instances of someone "trying out their wings". Hans Christian Andersen himself travelled relentlessly, but had a morbid fear of death. Wherever he laid his head, there next to him was a coil of rope which he took everywhere with him, and a handwritten notice, saying, "I only seem dead". He was obsessed with the thought that he might lapse into a coma, and be buried before he could come round. In fact he kept this strange morbid dread of being buried alive through to the very day he died. Over the next few decades, until his death in 1875, he continued to write for both children and adults. He wrote several autobiographies, and also travel narratives and poetry about the Scandinavian people. In 1845, English translations of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales and stories began to gain the attention of foreign audiences. He became a friend of Charles Dickens, who was already enormously popular, although this friendship ended in failure after Hans Christian Andersen had overstayed his welcome at the great author's home. Charles Dickens rather spitefully put up a notice on the wall of his bedroom, after Hans Christian Andersen had left. It read, "Hans Christian Andersen slept in this room for five weeks—which seemed to the family AGES!" It was in England that Hans Christian Andersen's stories first became classics, despite originally being written in Danish. They had a strong influence on subsequent British children's authors, including George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, A.A. Milne and Beatrix Potter. Over time, Scandinavian audiences then discovered his stories, and now of course they are known world-wide. Hans Christian Andersen's tales seem to have universal appeal, no matter what language they are read in. His stories express themes that transcend age and nationality—often presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity. They are written in a very chatty intimate style, which won him no favours from his original literary critics, who considered this tone inappropriate. But once he found his voice, he found he could not stop writing them, saying, "They forced themselves from me". A friend once expostulated, "You're capable of writing about anything - even a darning needle!" And sure enough, the author rose to the challenge, in his story entitled "The Darning Needle". The stories are clearly cathartic, but also full of beauty, tragedy, nature, religion, artfulness, deception, betrayal, love, death, judgement and penance. And—very occasionally—one has a happy ending. The author called his autobiography "The Fairy Tale of my Life", and indeed his life reads like a traditional fairy tale. Think what the blurb might be: "The son of an illiterate washerwoman and a poor cobbler, who may secretly be a royal prince, who, through sheer persistence and influential help from an unlikely source, becomes a world-famous author, in a privileged position, hobnobbing with royalty" perhaps? Ironically, at the age of fourteen, when he left home, he had predicted this outcome, "First you go through terrible suffering and then you become famous." Charles Perrault had collected fairy tales from many cultural traditions in 1697, and a couple of centuries later in 1808 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collected German folk and fairy tales. Later still, Hans Christian Andersen's first fairy tales followed this template of rewriting a traditional story, but in fact only eight out of a total of 156 are direct retllings of Danish folk tales. He quickly moved on to writing his own—and you can certainly tell. Every single one seems to be about an aspect of himself, and he freely admitted, "I was always the chief person", the gawky ugly duckling who didn't quite fit in. His friend H.C. Orsted had said to him, "[Your novel] will make you famous, but the fairy tales will make you immortal". I have rarely felt such ambivalence towards an author. These fairy stories are probably by the only author for whom my personal rating of works varies between one and five stars. He is an extraordinary writer, but I cannot say that I have enjoyed very many of his tales; many of them I have had to steal myself to read. It will certainly be a while before I read another big book of fairy stories, after ploughing through two collections of "Tales from the Arabian Nights" and now this one. The stories vary in standard and taste so much, that I have given this volume my default rating of three stars. And because of this, I have felt it necessary to review nearly all—(in fact thirty-five)—of the stories in this collection separately, whenever they have been published as individual books. Please see my shelves for links, if you wish to read my review of a particular story. The 40 stories in this volume are: The Princess and the Pea Thumbelina The Swineherd The Buckwheat The Wild Swans The Darning Needle The Nightingale The Teapot The Ugly Duckling The Snow Queen The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep The Last Dream of the Old Oak Tree The Shadow It's Perfectly True Grief Father's Always Right The Snowman The Snail and the Rose Tree "Something' The Fir Tree The Tinderbox Little Ida's Flowers The Little Mermaid The Emperor's New Clothes The Steadfast Tin Soldier The Flying Trunk The Sweethearts "She Was No Good' The Bell The Little Match Girl The Collar The Goblin at the Grocer's In a Thousand Years' Time Five Peas from the Same Pod The Beetle The Toad Dance, Dance, Dolly Mine! The Flax The Gardener and his Master The Book of Fairy Tales

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    Taking the FutureLearn course from Odense. You can find the complete tales online here HC Andersen Museum Collection 1 Corinthians Chapter 13 Catechism in Christianity

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Monroe

    This is an absolutely fantastic collection of Hans Christian Andersen's best work. The translation, by Tiina Nunnally, is sublime and her notes on past translations of Andersen's stories makes it clear just how sublime it is. If you wanted to read a version closer to H.C. Andersen's original, you'd have to read these in Danish. Jackie Wullschlager's introduction is easily one of the best I've read and an essential lens through which to better understand these tales. Short of reading Wullschlager' This is an absolutely fantastic collection of Hans Christian Andersen's best work. The translation, by Tiina Nunnally, is sublime and her notes on past translations of Andersen's stories makes it clear just how sublime it is. If you wanted to read a version closer to H.C. Andersen's original, you'd have to read these in Danish. Jackie Wullschlager's introduction is easily one of the best I've read and an essential lens through which to better understand these tales. Short of reading Wullschlager's biography of Andersen, "Hans Christian Andersen: The Life of a Storyteller", I think you'd be hard pressed to read a more wonderful account of Andersen's life and stories than this 32-page introduction. And what about the stories themselves? The stories are, of course, phenomenal. This is the first time I've read any of Andersen's stories since I was a child and, if possible, I enjoyed reading them even more as an adult. All the witticisms and references to Andersen's life that you don't pick up on as a child are to be savored as an adult. Many of these stories I had never read or heard before, so I was also surprised and brought back to what it was like to be a child again - so enrapturing are these tales. There are a total of 30 to be found in this lovely collection, some utterly delightful, others surprisingly dark, and still others that perhaps pale in comparison to the rest. But one thing that is for sure is that these tales are rendered by Tiiny Nunnally to be enjoyed better than ever before in English. 1. The Tinderbox - 5 Stars Yes, this is a 5-star story to be sure. More folk than fairy, this tale is in fact based on an older Danish folktale that Andersen transformed with his characteristic wit. It features an A+ decapitation and glorious references to sugar-pigs, cake-wives, and social status. It's stupendous. 2. Little Claus and Big Claus - 5 stars So when I saw the title for some reason I thought that this was going to have something to do with Santa Claus until I realized that, oh yes, Claus is actually a name for ordinary people as well - specifically, Germanic men. But that aside, this is a hilarious story, also based on a Danish folktale, about an awfully clever little fellow who performs some delightful tricks. 3. The Princess on the Pea - 5 stars This is a simple little story but I liked it all the same. One of Andersen's more famous, it has been at last been rendered into English with the correct title (previously this was widely known in English as "The Princess AND the Pea"). A princess who's able to feel a pea beneath 20 mattresses and 20 quilts?? Why, that's something special indeed! How the pea didn't get squashed is something I would have enjoyed learning. 4. Thumbelina - 5 stars Another Andersen classic, "Thumbelina" is a delightful tale and at times a bit scary. Inspired by the folktale "Tom Thumb", this one concerns a little thumb-sized lady and her adventures out in the big wide world. You'll never look at moles the same way! 5. The Traveling Companion - 5 stars This is the first story in the collection that I don't remember having heard before. And it is absolutely fabulous. Quite darker than the ones that preceded it as well. To call it the Danish "Rumplestiltskin" doesn't quite do it justice, and I actually think I liked it better than that famous Grimm Brothers' tale. 6. The Little Mermaid - 5 stars The most famous of Andersen's stories and, in my opinion, the best. The Disney adaptation, which is almost more famous now than the original, is one of Disney's best films and it is still a terrible adaptation. This has it all, including an almost perfect ending. I saw "almost" because the last page of this feels tacked on. The Little Mermaid throws herself from the ship into the sea, and her body dissolves into foam. That should have been the end But instead we get a bizarre bit about "daughters of the air" and an obvious plea to children to be good. That tarnishes what would have otherwise been a perfect tale. But, even tarnished, this is still the great writer's best. 7. The Emperor's New Clothes - 5 stars After "The Little Mermaid", this is likely my favorite of Andersen's stories, and after "The Little Mermaid" it's also probably his most famous. You all know the story, no need for me to recap it here, but I was surprised to learn that the little boy's famous cry at the end of "But he doesn't have anything on!" was hastily added by Andersen after the story had already been sent off to the printer's. This is a satire as excellent and brilliant today, in the age of Trump, as ever. 8. The Steadfast Tin Soldier - 5 stars Delightfully poetic. This is the first of Andersen's stories in this collection to feature inanimate objects brought to life. I'd never noticed how clearly Andersen influenced later films like "Toy Story" until I read this story about the quite appropriately named Steadfast Tin Soldier. 9. The Wild Swans - 5 stars Another classic, albeit one I wasn't too familiar with. This one is also based on a classic European folktale, and it's got all the famous elements we see in other tales like Cinderella. Evil stepmother, a bit of magic, and the transformative power of love. 10. The Flying Trunk - 3 stars This is a sort of story within a story, one involving matches and some dishware, and the other the titular trunk and a Turkish engagement. If only our rich merchant's son could have resisted the urge to set off those fireworks... 11. The Nightingale - 5 stars Surprisingly sweet, this story of the Chinese Emperor and his obsession with the nightingale took a number of unexpected turns. Andersen was clearly in high spirits when he wrote this one. 12. The Sweethearts - 4 stars This thought-provoking tale feels like something Andersen wrote after having become the most famous writer in Denmark (and one of the most famous in all Europe) and thinking back on when a woman he loved rejected him - and, lo and behold, it was! All I can say is, that ball deserved it. 13. The Ugly Duckling - 5 stars Come on. You know you love this one. Another one with clear allusions to Andersen's life. 14. The Fir Tree - 4 stars It's only once you've grown up that you realize that all that urgency to grow up was unwarranted. A reminder to slow down and savor life while you can. 15. The Snow Queen - 5 stars This is one of Andersen's more beloved tales, and it features some beautiful moments and spectacular images. The first part, about the mirror, is haunting, and this more than any of Andersen's other tales seems to deal with the battle between good and evil. Reading it, I was reminded of Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy. 16. The Red Shoes - 3 stars Behave yourselves, children! Don't you wear red shoes when you ought to be wearing black ones or you'll be forced to dance dance dance! 17. The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep - 3 stars Worth it just for the final line - "and (they) loved each other until they broke". 18. The Shadow - 5 stars Woah! I was not expecting that! This reads much more like something Franz Kafka would have written than Hans Christian Andersen. Surprisingly dark and spookily strange. There's nothing else quite like it in Andersen's oeuvre. 19. The Old House - 4 stars There's something surprisingly spooky about this store, reportedly much beloved by Charles Dickens. That poor tin soldier... 20. The Little Match Girl - 5 stars Speaking of Charles Dickens, this gorgeous and heartwrenching story is H.C. Andersen at his most Dickensian. The image of the Little Match Girl, shuddering with cold while staring into the windows of those whose tables were laden with New Year's feasts is absolutely haunting. One of Andersen's best. 21. The Story of a Mother - 4 stars Andersen's misery at his repressed bisexuality and societal isolation made for some incredible tales, not least this one. It all begs the question: whose stories are better? Happy Hans or Miserable Hans? 22. The Collar - 3 stars So I've decided I'm not as big a fan of Andersen's stories that feature inanimate objects as primary characters as much as I am the others. This one I found rather ho-hum. Though it is amusingly self-deprecating. 23. The Bell - 3 stars This one was pleasant enough, but failed to leave much of an impact. 24. The Marsh King's Daughter - 2 stars I thought this one was much too long, featured too many religious overtones, and was ultimately quite unmemorable. Overshadowed by many, much better, stories. 25. The Wind Tells of Valdemar Daae and His Daughters - 2 stars I don't think the wind told it best. 26. The Snowman - 4 stars One can once again see evidence of Andersen's suppressed desires in the Snowman's desperately wanting to be with the Stove. Something that European society at the time would have certainly found most unnatural. 27. The Ice Maiden - 5 stars This fantastic story, set in Switzerland, is one of the best in the collection. Two people, stranded on the island in the little lake, until the Ice Maiden calls the other away. An image both beautiful and haunting. 28. The Wood Nymph - 4 stars Beautiful, uncorrupted nature versus the corrupt hustle and bustle of the city. Andersen as environmentalist, perhaps? 29. The Most Incredible Thing - 5 stars On art and those who would seek to eradicate it. Used during WWII by the Danish Resistance. Without art, without culture, there is nothing. 30. Auntie Toothache - 4 stars This was the last story Hans Christian Andersen ever wrote. Andersen suffered from toothaches his entire life (19th-century European dentistry not being what it is today), and here he has his protagonist, a poet, receives a visit from the titular Auntie Toothache, who promises pain unless the poet should give up writing - forever. Humanity has to be grateful that Andersen himself never made such an agreement.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Good gravy but something was wrong with Hans Christian Anderson. If household objects aren't chatting about their social status, then people are dying in the streets of Copenhagen! I mean, seriously. I knew the original story of The Little Mermaid, but my kids didn't. The horror on their faces was priceless. I also knew the basic story of The Snow Queen, mostly from the Faerie Tale Theatre version. I'd never read the whole thing. I think the best part was when Gerda asks the flowers if they've s Good gravy but something was wrong with Hans Christian Anderson. If household objects aren't chatting about their social status, then people are dying in the streets of Copenhagen! I mean, seriously. I knew the original story of The Little Mermaid, but my kids didn't. The horror on their faces was priceless. I also knew the basic story of The Snow Queen, mostly from the Faerie Tale Theatre version. I'd never read the whole thing. I think the best part was when Gerda asks the flowers if they've seen Kai, and they all reply with weird, existential imagery, and Gerda says, "Well, that's not at all helpful!" HILARIOUS. This is a beautiful edition, though. Color and black-and-white illustrations, gilt-edged, rich paper. Very nice!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    There are some good stories here, and some that scarred my childhood. Between dead match girls and trashed fir trees not to mention frightening Snow Queens the Thumblinias were sometimes needed. Still they last. Excuse me I didn't get much sleep last night, there was something poking my back under my 20 mattresses.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    this is a beautiful barnes & noble edition has some of my favorite fairy tales in it. also some i've never read before. with wonderful illustrations some in colour and full page.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hossein Sharifi

    FANTASTIC !!!! I dreamt of Wind and Rain... I ran with Fairies... Cats whispered to me from dawn to dusk ... I could feel the breeze touching trees' hair. I was living in the fairy tales till the end of the book ! ....................................................... I would like to recommend this to all who want to escape from the harshness of this so called "real world" ! ... It will open a door of dreams to you !

  15. 4 out of 5

    M Blankier

    Andersen is probably best known today for “The Little Mermaid,” usually in the sense that children who have seen the Disney film often hear, from their friends, something to the effect of, “Did you know that she actually dies in the end.” Andersen stories, more than any other traditional fairy tales, are filled with pathos and sadness, and end badly for their protagonists. But to dismiss Andersen’s tales as “dark” fairy tales or, as seems to often be the case, a way to totally scar children forev Andersen is probably best known today for “The Little Mermaid,” usually in the sense that children who have seen the Disney film often hear, from their friends, something to the effect of, “Did you know that she actually dies in the end.” Andersen stories, more than any other traditional fairy tales, are filled with pathos and sadness, and end badly for their protagonists. But to dismiss Andersen’s tales as “dark” fairy tales or, as seems to often be the case, a way to totally scar children forever, is truly to miss out on an incredible imaginary world, one so rich in meaning and elegantly constructed in lyrical language, and to which we mostly owe the aesthetic sensibilities we associate with fairy tales today. When you imagine a fairy tale, you don’t just see the beautiful princess and handsome suitor of the Grimms or Perrault, but the untainted, exquisite nature of Andersen, the warmth of a hearth, the sparkling of snow, the detail. No fairy tale writer before Andersen had been so literary. Nunnally’s translation is faithful not only to the original language, but the poetic spirit of the original text. Yes, Andersen’s stories are brutal, but they are also gentle; merciless, but also sympathetic and tender. The ending of “The Little Mermaid” so often quoted is actually an invitation to children to be good. Like clapping your hands to bring a fairy back to life in Peter Pan, a good child helps shorten the mermaid’s sentence in purgatory and send her to heaven; it’s very beautiful, and if you bypass Andersen’s tales under the idea that they’re screwed up, as I almost did, you are missing out on one of the greatest children’s classics ever written.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erasmia Kritikou

    Πέντε αστέρια για τις υπέροχες ιστορίες του Πατέρα όλων των παραμυθιών -με αυτο το ιδιότυπα λυπηρό, συνηθως τέλος που αγαπά να δίνει στους ήρωές του- μείον ένα αστέρι για τις λιγότερο ευφανταστες και αρκετα τσεκουρεμενες περιληψεις των εκδ. susaeta, καθως και την ελλειψη εντεχνου λόγου. Τεσσερα αστερια στο συνολο και για την συλλογή και διαλογή στη συγκεκριμενη εκδοση: γνωστα παραμυθια οπως η Τοσοδουλα, το Ασχημοπαπο, Άριελ η μικρή γοργόνα, το Κοριτσακι με τα Σπίρτα, αλλά και λιγοτερο γνωστα, εω Πέντε αστέρια για τις υπέροχες ιστορίες του Πατέρα όλων των παραμυθιών -με αυτο το ιδιότυπα λυπηρό, συνηθως τέλος που αγαπά να δίνει στους ήρωές του- μείον ένα αστέρι για τις λιγότερο ευφανταστες και αρκετα τσεκουρεμενες περιληψεις των εκδ. susaeta, καθως και την ελλειψη εντεχνου λόγου. Τεσσερα αστερια στο συνολο και για την συλλογή και διαλογή στη συγκεκριμενη εκδοση: γνωστα παραμυθια οπως η Τοσοδουλα, το Ασχημοπαπο, Άριελ η μικρή γοργόνα, το Κοριτσακι με τα Σπίρτα, αλλά και λιγοτερο γνωστα, εως σχεδον άγνωστα παραμυθια του, όπως ο Φοίνικας, η Πορσελανινη Βοσκοπουλα, η Καμπάνα κοκ. Γενικά, τα παιδιά μου το χαρηκαν. Εμένα μ' ενόχλησε η έλλειψη λογοτεχνίας και οι απλοποιήσεις σε αριστουργηματικά παραμύθια. Γενικά, δεν είναι να παίζεις με τους Μεγάλους Κλασσικούς. Θέλει σοβαρή προσέγγιση και σεβασμό, αν μη τι άλλο, ένα τέτοιο εγχείρημα. Ωστόσο, αποτελεί μια καλή πρώτη επαφή και γνωριμία με τα παραμύθια που αγάπησαν και ανέθρεψαν γενεές γενεών.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kübra Yağmur Aslanhan

    Andersen, namı diğer masalların babası... Bir zamanlar masalları uykuya dalmadan önce yüzlerde tebessüm bırakan güzel dinletiler zannederdim. Büyüdükçe hayat kadar korkunç ve gerçek olduklarını anlamaya başladım.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    Saw this on the shelf at my library yesterday when I was browsing the audiobook selection, and used my Goodreads barcode app to scan it in from when I listened to it several months ago. I mostly enjoyed this, although I didn't love all the stories and I kept falling asleep on others as I listened (a hazard associated with listening to audiobooks at bedtime). Listening to 'The Little Mermaid' brought back that sense of sadness and poignancy of reading this much-loved story as a child. There are o Saw this on the shelf at my library yesterday when I was browsing the audiobook selection, and used my Goodreads barcode app to scan it in from when I listened to it several months ago. I mostly enjoyed this, although I didn't love all the stories and I kept falling asleep on others as I listened (a hazard associated with listening to audiobooks at bedtime). Listening to 'The Little Mermaid' brought back that sense of sadness and poignancy of reading this much-loved story as a child. There are other stories in this volume that are equally sad, such as "The Steadfast Tin Soldier,' which gives me some serious heartache. Although Andersen's stories are for a younger crowd than say, Grimms', there are some adult subject matter and themes here. At the same time, that sense of awe and enthusiasm that marks Hans Christian Andersen's storytelling gives these stories a lighter feel than the often gruesome and dark tone of many the real fairy tales (not the Disney versions). But I honestly think that fairy tales are almost essential to giving a child cultural development. It's nice to know that there is the option to play some of these fairy tales as audiobooks, although nothing beats reading a book with a child. I wasn't able to finish this, since it was due back, but I listened to the bulk of it, and I feel I should be able to count it as read. I was glad to see this at my library and that I had the opportunity to enjoy it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pinkerton

    Il ritmo di lettura serrato in quest’occasione non ha certo giovato ad un lavoro del genere, ma non è nemmeno andato ad incidere particolarmente su quella che comunque sarebbe stata la mia valutazione finale. Sono ben 156 i titoli all’interno del volume, eppure non mi sento così “arricchito” dopo l’esperienza. Ammetto che il mio approccio non è stato il medesimo con tutte quante le storie, le più blasonate diciamo, avevano da parte mia un occhio di riguardo in più… ma anche un’aspettativa maggio Il ritmo di lettura serrato in quest’occasione non ha certo giovato ad un lavoro del genere, ma non è nemmeno andato ad incidere particolarmente su quella che comunque sarebbe stata la mia valutazione finale. Sono ben 156 i titoli all’interno del volume, eppure non mi sento così “arricchito” dopo l’esperienza. Ammetto che il mio approccio non è stato il medesimo con tutte quante le storie, le più blasonate diciamo, avevano da parte mia un occhio di riguardo in più… ma anche un’aspettativa maggiore. Per le altre è stato diverso, godevano del beneficio del dubbio ma pagavano lo scotto di essere in mezzo a tante altre che avrei dovuto leggere in un lasso di tempo così breve (per via di una gara di lettura e di una mia decisione non troppo azzeccata ^^’). In generale posso dire di aver riscontrato le solite caratteristiche, morali e non, che accompagnano fiabe e racconti simili appartenenti alla tradizione europea, non filtrati dai rimaneggiamenti moderni atti a renderli più soft e commerciali. Il primo esempio che mi viene in mente è quello della sirenetta, ce la vedete voi una Ariel a cui viene mozzata la lingua come nella storia scritta da Andersen?! Questo è l’aspetto che più di tutti stimola il mio interesse nei confronti delle fiabe, non intendo quello truce, ma le differenze che posso scoprire su queste pagine. Una sorta di versione non censurata dell’originale così com’era stato concepito. Debbo dire però che l’esito non si è sempre rivelato così soddisfacente e, vuoi per la brevità di alcune, vuoi per il dilungarsi in modo relativamente utile di altre, vuoi per quel certo non so che… in più di un’occasione a mio avviso le trasposizioni moderne hanno avuto la meglio sulla vecchia scuola. Trova qui conferma il detto: “chi accresce la propria conoscenza accresce anche il proprio dolore”, perché l’immaginario di alcune storie ormai radicate in me sin dall’infanzia ha perso un po’ della sua magia, causandomi più dispiacere che delusione. Spesso dopo letture del genere mi ritrovo pentito di aver perso il tal titolo così come lo idealizzavo in cambio di una grama realtà, eppure paradossalmente continuo a farne :P Il resto dei racconti ha suscitato in me scarso interesse, non so se per colpa mia: non appartenendo al mio bagaglio culturale veniva a mancare la spinta motivazionale del confronto; o se per colpa loro: se gli altri sono così famosi e loro no un motivo c’è; fatto sta che mi sono apparsi semplicemente come una marea di riempitivi che hanno esageratamente appesantito il tomo. Non fraintendetemi, c’è anche roba buona ma niente che avesse quella ‘singolarità’ tale da fargli meritare le luci della ribalta. Lettura parecchio impegnativa e dall’esito discreto, però me la sono andata a cercare XD

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aubrey

    I recently chose this book for my book cub. I love HCA fairy tales. They are so compelling and read as though you are sitting at the man's feet and he is telling them straight to you and guestering with his overly large hands. What was so great about reading them this time is this particular edition that is translated by Tiina Nunnally. It is incredible with it's bio of him in the front- a MUST read and the notes about each story in the back to conect it to a time and place in the authors life. I recently chose this book for my book cub. I love HCA fairy tales. They are so compelling and read as though you are sitting at the man's feet and he is telling them straight to you and guestering with his overly large hands. What was so great about reading them this time is this particular edition that is translated by Tiina Nunnally. It is incredible with it's bio of him in the front- a MUST read and the notes about each story in the back to conect it to a time and place in the authors life. Also, the translation is fantastic. At the begining of each story is a picture of one of HCA's many intricte paper cut outs that he often created, which inspired me to get creative as well. I like that you can read one story or all of them. Some stories are one page long and others are 30, so you can take or leave it based on your time limit. If you haven't read The Little Mermaid and only seen the Disney Movie then you are really missing out. One of the most heartbreaking love stories you will ever read. My personal favorite is Great Clause and Little Clause. I laughed out loud when I read in the back notes that "Andersen sanitizes the sexual innuendo of the traditional version by giving the farmer an irrational dislike of deacons, though the cuckold theme is clear to adult readers." As a kid I totally bought that the farmer just had an irrational dislike of deacons, and rereading them as an adult has just been a pleasure. He is the original to what Pixar is doing now with thier storytelling that will entertain kids, allow them to learn lessons, and have a lot of deep thinking and jokes specifically put in just for adults. Just a note to parents - Some of these stories can be somewhat graphic and if you have a very sensative child you might want to preview them first, these are not your sanatized Disney version, but that is what is great about them. Enjoy!! I have also included some quotes I like about fairy tales. When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than any talent for abstract, positive thinking. - Albert Einstein (1879-1955) When Albert Einstein was asked how to develop intelligence in young people, he answered: "Read fairy tales. Then read more fairy tales." "Storytellers make us remember what mankind would have been like, had not fear and the failing will and the laws of nature tripped up its heels." -- W.B. Yeats "In a utilitarian age, of all other times, it is a matter of grave importance that fairy tales should be respected." -- Charles Dickens

  21. 5 out of 5

    Simona Bartolotta

    Belle, belle, bellissime. Intense, delicate, soavi, alcune allegre altre tristi, ma tutte in grado portarti nel mondo dei sogni e dell'innocenza dell'infanzia. “Ah, che ragazzaccio è mai questo Amor! Lo voglio dire a tutti i bambini buoni, perchè se ne guardino, e non giochino mai con lui: già, egli non farebbe loro che male...” [...] Tutti i buoni fanciulli, ragazzine e ragazzini, ai quali raccontò il fatto, si tengono ora in guardia contro il cattivello; ma egli è così scaltro ed accorto, che r Belle, belle, bellissime. Intense, delicate, soavi, alcune allegre altre tristi, ma tutte in grado portarti nel mondo dei sogni e dell'innocenza dell'infanzia. “Ah, che ragazzaccio è mai questo Amor! Lo voglio dire a tutti i bambini buoni, perchè se ne guardino, e non giochino mai con lui: già, egli non farebbe loro che male...” [...] Tutti i buoni fanciulli, ragazzine e ragazzini, ai quali raccontò il fatto, si tengono ora in guardia contro il cattivello; ma egli è così scaltro ed accorto, che riesce sempre a burlarsi delle loro precauzioni.”- da Il ragazzaccio “Lontano lontano, in alto mare, l'acqua è azzurra come i petali del più bel fiordaliso, e limpida come il più puro cristallo. Ma è molto profonda, più profonda di ogni scandaglio; bisognerebbe mettere molti e molti campanili l'uno sopra l'altro per arrivare dal fondo sino alla superficie dell'acqua. E laggiù, nel fondo, vive la gente del mare.” - da La Sirenetta

  22. 4 out of 5

    Van

    Should an apocalypse ever befall, this is the first book I'm putting in my survival bag. I don't think I can properly review this book, and I don't intend to. However, I cannot be silent about it when it had had such an impact on me. The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen encompass all beauty, darkness, and light there is in the world - in the human soul. These are charming stories for everyone of every age. Some tales are happy, and some are very, very sad. Yet they are beautifully w Should an apocalypse ever befall, this is the first book I'm putting in my survival bag. I don't think I can properly review this book, and I don't intend to. However, I cannot be silent about it when it had had such an impact on me. The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen encompass all beauty, darkness, and light there is in the world - in the human soul. These are charming stories for everyone of every age. Some tales are happy, and some are very, very sad. Yet they are beautifully written with a kind hand, from an honest, sensitive (broken) heart through an astonishing imagination. These pages bring you adventure, romance, cruelty, love, loss, gain, acceptance, mistakes, fear, courage, pain, death, life... So much life. And it's magical. It's true. It's the beating heart of Andersen. It's the heart of us all.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I thought I was a fan of Andersen, but I guess not a good one, as there were several tales here that I did not know. And I never before realized that The Princess and the Pea is actually only one page long. And that The Tinderbox is awful, that soldier is not a good guy. The Swineherd is a terrific story in any edition, and here it has some of the best pix in the book. All the pictures are excellent, actually. They have a certain kind of eerie charm, a beauty that is made of both joy and creepine I thought I was a fan of Andersen, but I guess not a good one, as there were several tales here that I did not know. And I never before realized that The Princess and the Pea is actually only one page long. And that The Tinderbox is awful, that soldier is not a good guy. The Swineherd is a terrific story in any edition, and here it has some of the best pix in the book. All the pictures are excellent, actually. They have a certain kind of eerie charm, a beauty that is made of both joy and creepiness. You might want to investigate them for yourself before sharing with your child. Many favorites are omitted, which is good because nobody needs another version of Ugly Duckling, Little Mermaid, or even Snow Queen. I would have liked to see Zwerger's work for The Red Shoes and The Steadfast Tin Soldier, though. Btw, I just did a search, and found HCA's name attached to the movie "Frozen" (gonna investigate that!) and to a list of 212 (!) tales: http://www.andersen.sdu.dk/vaerk/regi...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mykee Tan

    Whenever I get exhausted from listening to lectures, writing papers, making reports or solving problems at the university, I always find that at the end of the day, all I need to calm down my traffic jam of a six-day school week is a pleasant story from Andersen's collection of stories. There is something so compelling about Andersen's tales. They are the simplest, shortest stories I have ever had the pleasure of reading and yet, their morals leave me thinking far past the stories themselves and Whenever I get exhausted from listening to lectures, writing papers, making reports or solving problems at the university, I always find that at the end of the day, all I need to calm down my traffic jam of a six-day school week is a pleasant story from Andersen's collection of stories. There is something so compelling about Andersen's tales. They are the simplest, shortest stories I have ever had the pleasure of reading and yet, their morals leave me thinking far past the stories themselves and onto a broad array of matters which I encounter around me every single day.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Having recently moved to Denmark I needed to get familiar with its number one writer! This was a wonderful collection of stories, some rather dark truth be told but that's what makes them so special. They are fantastical, gritty, funny, sad and everything real writing should be. Classic storytelling which will stand the test of time.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ghazal

    فکر کنم عشقم به کتاب خوندن رو مدیون این مجموعه داستانم، مرسی هانس کریستین آندرسن❤

  27. 4 out of 5

    Noelle

    Beautifully selected works set in a fantastic translation, Hans Christian Anderson’s The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories is a wonderful introduction to the author’s work. His famous works are included and the translations are just as engaging as Anderson’s original tales. What is pertinent about Anderson’s work is his descriptions and gift for imagery. For example, in ‘The Little Mermaid’ Anderson opens his story by describing the colors and textures of the undersea kingdom that is both lyrical Beautifully selected works set in a fantastic translation, Hans Christian Anderson’s The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories is a wonderful introduction to the author’s work. His famous works are included and the translations are just as engaging as Anderson’s original tales. What is pertinent about Anderson’s work is his descriptions and gift for imagery. For example, in ‘The Little Mermaid’ Anderson opens his story by describing the colors and textures of the undersea kingdom that is both lyrical and vivid, “The waters are as blue as the petals of the cornflower and as clear as glass.…” Anderson’s ability to write diversely while remaining fresh is also a noticeable trait. His stories relate about orphans, oriental clockwork birds, and toy soldiers, each aiming to entertain, to educate on life lessons, or to illuminate on morality and mortal philosophies. The arrangement and organization of the stories are aptly crafted, as is the flow and pacing of each story. Though the pacing varies from tale to tale, such can be seen in ‘The Snow Queen,’ and “The Little Match Girl,’ the quality of the stories, in language and substance, make up for the structure. This collection is universally enjoyable and capable of variety and thoughtful insight. Anderson’s tales prove that children need not settle for simplicity or repetitive formulas; they are worthy of substance and intellectual care.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    These stories make me cry. Grimm's fairy tales are cautionary fables. These are tiny little slices of tragic reality, dressed up in doll's clothing or hidden behind animal masks. Check out "The Steadfast Tin Soldier,""The Ugly Duckling,"and "The Little Match Girl." Devastating.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Fairytales are the only place I find validation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lilirose

    Le fiabe di Andersen sono tante e spaziano dal buffo al commovente, ma tutte hanno in comune una vena di poesia che affascina grandi e piccini: sin dalle prime righe sembra di entrare in un mondo incantato, ed è questo che si richiede ad una fiaba in fondo. Naturalmente in una produzione così sconfinata è ovvio che ce ne siano di meno riuscite: alcune sono dei semplici divertissement, altre sono un po' troppo paternalistiche, ma anche nelle più banali c'è quel tocco magico che è l'impronta inconf Le fiabe di Andersen sono tante e spaziano dal buffo al commovente, ma tutte hanno in comune una vena di poesia che affascina grandi e piccini: sin dalle prime righe sembra di entrare in un mondo incantato, ed è questo che si richiede ad una fiaba in fondo. Naturalmente in una produzione così sconfinata è ovvio che ce ne siano di meno riuscite: alcune sono dei semplici divertissement, altre sono un po' troppo paternalistiche, ma anche nelle più banali c'è quel tocco magico che è l'impronta inconfondibile dell'autore. Certe poi sono dei piccoli capolavori: penso alla straziante "La bambina dei fiammiferi" o all'elaborata "La regina delle nevi"(quasi un romanzo in miniatura), ma soprattutto penso a "La sirenetta", struggente e di grande atmosfera. Attenzione però a non accostarsi ad Andersen pensandolo "facile" e giocoso: nelle sue fiabe il lieto fine non è mai scontato, i protagonisti soffrono e non è detto che siano ricompensati e non ha remore nel mostrare anche gli aspetti più crudi della vita: questo perchè ci sono vari livelli di lettura, non sono pensate per un pubblico esclusivamente di bambini. Leggere Andersen è sempre un'esperienza memorabile, e nonostante la morale un po' anacronistica e decisamente troppo religiosa per i miei gusti le sue opere riescono sempre a farmi sognare.

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