kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Trinity: A Novel

Availability: Ready to download

From the acclaimed author of Speak comes a kaleidoscopic novel about Robert Oppenheimer—father of the atomic bomb—as told by seven fictional characters J. Robert Oppenheimer was a brilliant scientist, a champion of liberal causes, and a complex and often contradictory character. He loyally protected his Communist friends, only to later betray them under questioning. He repe From the acclaimed author of Speak comes a kaleidoscopic novel about Robert Oppenheimer—father of the atomic bomb—as told by seven fictional characters J. Robert Oppenheimer was a brilliant scientist, a champion of liberal causes, and a complex and often contradictory character. He loyally protected his Communist friends, only to later betray them under questioning. He repeatedly lied about love affairs. And he defended the use of the atomic bomb he helped create, before ultimately lobbying against nuclear proliferation. Through narratives that cross time and space, a set of characters bears witness to the life of Oppenheimer, from a secret service agent who tailed him in San Francisco, to the young lover of a colleague in Los Alamos, to a woman fleeing McCarthyism who knew him on St. John. As these men and women fall into the orbit of a brilliant but mercurial mind at work, all consider his complicated legacy while also uncovering deep and often unsettling truths about their own lives. In this stunning, elliptical novel, Louisa Hall has crafted a breathtaking and explosive story about the ability of the human mind to believe what it wants, about public and private tragedy, and about power and guilt. Blending science with literature and fiction with biography, Trinity asks searing questions about what it means to truly know someone, and about the secrets we keep from the world and from ourselves.


Compare
kode adsense disini

From the acclaimed author of Speak comes a kaleidoscopic novel about Robert Oppenheimer—father of the atomic bomb—as told by seven fictional characters J. Robert Oppenheimer was a brilliant scientist, a champion of liberal causes, and a complex and often contradictory character. He loyally protected his Communist friends, only to later betray them under questioning. He repe From the acclaimed author of Speak comes a kaleidoscopic novel about Robert Oppenheimer—father of the atomic bomb—as told by seven fictional characters J. Robert Oppenheimer was a brilliant scientist, a champion of liberal causes, and a complex and often contradictory character. He loyally protected his Communist friends, only to later betray them under questioning. He repeatedly lied about love affairs. And he defended the use of the atomic bomb he helped create, before ultimately lobbying against nuclear proliferation. Through narratives that cross time and space, a set of characters bears witness to the life of Oppenheimer, from a secret service agent who tailed him in San Francisco, to the young lover of a colleague in Los Alamos, to a woman fleeing McCarthyism who knew him on St. John. As these men and women fall into the orbit of a brilliant but mercurial mind at work, all consider his complicated legacy while also uncovering deep and often unsettling truths about their own lives. In this stunning, elliptical novel, Louisa Hall has crafted a breathtaking and explosive story about the ability of the human mind to believe what it wants, about public and private tragedy, and about power and guilt. Blending science with literature and fiction with biography, Trinity asks searing questions about what it means to truly know someone, and about the secrets we keep from the world and from ourselves.

30 review for Trinity: A Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    When you start thinking about Oppenheimer, there is one big place your mind tends to go: how do you live the rest of your life after creating what may be the end of humanity? How do you live knowing all the people who have died because of your discovery? How do you separate the scientific search of knowledge from the human exploitation of that knowledge? In Louisa Hall's novel those questions are definitely there, but they're also secondary to smaller, more personal questions about causing harm When you start thinking about Oppenheimer, there is one big place your mind tends to go: how do you live the rest of your life after creating what may be the end of humanity? How do you live knowing all the people who have died because of your discovery? How do you separate the scientific search of knowledge from the human exploitation of that knowledge? In Louisa Hall's novel those questions are definitely there, but they're also secondary to smaller, more personal questions about causing harm to those you love most. In these interconnected stories, Oppenheimer is the central figure but the central thread is how we love, how we hurt those we love, and how we stop loving. If you're wondering what Oppenheimer has to do with that kind of question, it's answered for us quite early in the book. Oppenheimer cheated on his wife Kitty, and then years later had to answer questions about the affair in front of a congressional hearing while his wife sat in the crowd listening. The characters around Oppenheimer have their own romantic betrayals, both given and received. They consider their lovers and spouses and wonder if they can ever truly know them or if they themselves are really known. It took me a little while to get into this book. The first of the chapters had me a bit off kilter and I am not always patient enough to take the time to orient myself. But I read Hall's previous novel, SPEAK, which also used interconnected stories to explore big questions (in that book, questions of thought and consciousness and technology) so I kept coming back to it until it stuck and it was worth the effort. It didn't quite hit me in the gut the way SPEAK did, though the reasons are more structural than anything else, but as someone who has always approached Oppenheimer's work and the work of other scientists as a science person, I enjoyed changing my point of view. There's also a lot here on McCarthyism and suspicion, the limitations put on women in mid-century America, jealousy, and more. I appreciated how many of these stories were narrated by women, definitely not what you'd get from a male writer taking on a similar project, and was especially pleased that one section was focused on a queer couple. This is a thoughtful book that is not going to give you easy answers. It's going to make you work a bit, it's going to make you look for the connections and work to see the questions it's asking. But if you're willing to make the effort, it's worth it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    KC

    Through various narrative, colleagues, friends, and acquaintances reveal through interconnected accounts the life of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the brilliant scientist and man behind the atomic bomb. Over multiple years, lives are compromised and destroyed in more ways than one, leaving us to ponder the phrases "a weapon to end the use of all weapons" and "a violence to end all other forms of violence". This work of historic fiction will leave readers with a great deal to contemplate.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    I had never of novelist Louisa Hall before I read her new book, "Trinity". Set in a range of places from Los Alamos to Princeton to San Francisco, the book tells the story - a story - about J Robert Oppenheim, developer of the atomic bomb. Hall does this by writing "short stories" as chapters, using narrators who often have a sketchy connection with Oppenheimer and his life. The reader soon realises that some of these narrators are less than reliable in the stories and interpretations they're gi I had never of novelist Louisa Hall before I read her new book, "Trinity". Set in a range of places from Los Alamos to Princeton to San Francisco, the book tells the story - a story - about J Robert Oppenheim, developer of the atomic bomb. Hall does this by writing "short stories" as chapters, using narrators who often have a sketchy connection with Oppenheimer and his life. The reader soon realises that some of these narrators are less than reliable in the stories and interpretations they're giving. Who was J Robert Oppenheimer? I'd advise reading a Wiki entry on him to get the broad outlines of his life and accomplishments. Two years ago, I read a biography of Oppenheimer, "American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer", by Kai Bird. Bird's book is over 700 pages; Hall's book is about half the size. But Bird has written a straight biography, whereas Louisa Hall has written a novel - with fictional characters providing a lot of information. Is it truth or is it fantasy? Part and part? I read and enjoyed the book but still don't know how to describe it. Perhaps the best way to describe this book is to say it as much about the supplementary characters as it is about Oppenheimer. The other question is: does Louisa Hall have an agenda in writing her book? It's very clear that she is bitterly against the development and then dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan to end WW2. She - or her characters - blame Oppenheimer for the dropping of the bombs, yet those decisions were made by President Truman, his cabinet, and the US Army. If you want to blame Robert Oppenheimer for something, blame him for taking the job offered by the government to develop the bombs. Everything Hall writes about the damages done by the bombs concern the Japanese victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, who were continually affected by the radiation after the dropping of the two bombs. No where in her book, that I could find, did she write about the pluses of using the bombs - shortening the war and saving possibly millions of lives of Japanese who would have died defending the invasion of the home islands, as well as the hundreds of thousands of prisoners in China, Indo-China, and other Japanese war holdings who were treated miserably by their captors. (I do want to say that I lived in Santa Fe for eight years and traveled often "up the mountain" to see Los Alamos, as well as taken classes and heard speeches by scientists and historians who say we needed to drop the bombs. I am a life-long liberal who hates the ideas of the bombs, but have come to the conclusion they were needed. A short but superb work of non-fiction I can recommend is "Five Days in August" by Princeton professor of history, Michael Gordin" on the subject.) Okay, to return to Louisa Hall's novel, I can honestly say that I enjoyed it. She's an excellent writer and as long as you're not taking what she writes as gospel, "Trinity" is good reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    A fictional narrative about James Oppenheimer, father of the atom bomb and how he lived his life after his role in causing so much death and destruction. But the book also hits on the McCarthyism of the time and Oppenheimer’s cheating on his wife, Kitty, which he ends up testifying to in court. Seven fictional narrators tell the story from seven different perspectives and it becomes clear that we never really know what is going on in another’s mind or what their true motives or feelings may be.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Really interesting read, and Hall does a remarkable job of giving all of the different narrators a distinct voice. I liked the concept of trying to understand Oppenheimer through the people who interacted with him, even tangentially. But the conclusion was somewhat unsatisfying, which may have been the point, but it still was a little disappointing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mich

    Trinity is the name J. Robert Oppenheimer gave to the test of the atom bomb at Los Alamos prior to its bombing of Hiroshima. The characters in this novel by Louisa Hall are both fictional and real. Hall uses seven characters in seven chapters to describe their recollections/testaments through interactions with Oppenheimer. Some of these interactions are so minor, they hardly add to the understanding of Oppenheimer and are more descriptive of the persons recounting their own lives. Other chapters Trinity is the name J. Robert Oppenheimer gave to the test of the atom bomb at Los Alamos prior to its bombing of Hiroshima. The characters in this novel by Louisa Hall are both fictional and real. Hall uses seven characters in seven chapters to describe their recollections/testaments through interactions with Oppenheimer. Some of these interactions are so minor, they hardly add to the understanding of Oppenheimer and are more descriptive of the persons recounting their own lives. Other chapters provide more information about him. The book provides a fair amount of factual information about Oppenheimer that is already well-known and is not intended to provide more factual information. At times during my reading, I felt compelled to google actual events. For example, one of the chapters features Kitty (Oppenheimer’s wife) and “Chester”. It would have helped me if I could have known from the outset that this was his code-name since for several pages I had no idea who this was. Hall uses the fictional characters telling their stories to raise her own questions about Oppenheimer, the father of the atom bomb, and his motives regarding relations with other women, objections to the H-bomb tests, his membership in the Communist party, possible spying/support to Russia, the McCarthy hearings where he “gave up” colleagues, and his lies. Hall, who also writes poetry, uses her descriptive skills to soften some of what otherwise could have been a serious polemic and writes extremely well so that the book moves very rapidly. Her weaving together of external references, such as Crime and Punishment are masterful. She uses her own narrative skills to question her own thoughts about Oppenheimer as an enigma. The construction of the book as a fictional historical biography gives license to Hall to express her own thoughts about Oppenheimer. She does a great job.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Clio

    I read Speak last year when the cover called to me from a library shelf. When this came out I wanted to read it right away because there is something so different, so special about Louisa Hall's writing. She makes me fall in love over and over again with her characters. Somehow she switches between them frequently and they're flawed and maybe typically "unlikeable"but she makes me understand them so well I love them - which is especially interesting in this book threaded with the question of "ho I read Speak last year when the cover called to me from a library shelf. When this came out I wanted to read it right away because there is something so different, so special about Louisa Hall's writing. She makes me fall in love over and over again with her characters. Somehow she switches between them frequently and they're flawed and maybe typically "unlikeable"but she makes me understand them so well I love them - which is especially interesting in this book threaded with the question of "how well can you really understand another person?" In this (fictional) book, we are viewing Robert Oppenheimer from the "testimonials" of several people who knew him throughout his life and career, interspersed with a little countdown to the Trinity test - "We knew the world would not be the same" - Robert Oppenheimer - this is the ultimate moment of a life that has "crystallized" and become something to everyone Oppenheimer encounters from this point on. "We tell our lives to other people like stories. We make characters out of ourselves. If we're skilled, we make ourselves seem almost lifelike." "It's then, when we're left with nothing more than the shadows of events that have already dematerialized, that we're compelled to add layers of detail, as if we might give substance to shadows, converting them into the status of objects." "I thought that perhaps it's only in those moments between the slides of the kaleidoscope, those moments of a life that never crystallize into practiced anecdote or reliable knowledge, that we close our eyes and people pass through us, or over us and around us, as a wave sweeps us off our feet and makes us another part of its motion. Then, I thought, in that moment of unknowing, there's no difference between us."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    I gave this book a 4 star rating for two unusual reasons. #1 - I learned a lot about Tobert Oppenheimer - not a go-to subject for me but the format of the story gave information without it being overwhelmingly just facts. #2 - The format the author used to present the story was unusual yet very enjoyable. The author presented seven fictional characters to tell the story of how they knew Robert Oppenheimer (father of the atomic bomb), the time frame that they knew him and insight into his life as I gave this book a 4 star rating for two unusual reasons. #1 - I learned a lot about Tobert Oppenheimer - not a go-to subject for me but the format of the story gave information without it being overwhelmingly just facts. #2 - The format the author used to present the story was unusual yet very enjoyable. The author presented seven fictional characters to tell the story of how they knew Robert Oppenheimer (father of the atomic bomb), the time frame that they knew him and insight into his life as well as enlightening aspects of the characters life. Each character gave a narrative; each chapter was a "testament" from each character. The fictional characters had interesting and philosophical events going on in their lives which added to the historical aspects in the life of Oppenheimer. Hall details the testing of the atomic bomb, of which Oppenheimer developed, the launch of the A bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki plus takes him through the years when he testified against friends during the McCarthy trials against the Communist Party. The last testament in the book was very philosophical in nature. Hall did a good summary and the story came full circle. A surprisingly likeable read for me!! (A Likely Story Bookstore ARC)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glen U

    "Trinity" is billed as a fictional biography about the father of the atomic bomb, Robert Oppenheimer. In a series of vignettes, utilizing seven fictional characters and some true facts and documented situations that actually occurred, Hall pieces together a book about human nature using Oppenheimer, as her focal point. She infers the emotions that Oppenheimer went through in his early life at Berkeley, his development of the atomic bomb during World War 2, his guilt and resistance of it being us "Trinity" is billed as a fictional biography about the father of the atomic bomb, Robert Oppenheimer. In a series of vignettes, utilizing seven fictional characters and some true facts and documented situations that actually occurred, Hall pieces together a book about human nature using Oppenheimer, as her focal point. She infers the emotions that Oppenheimer went through in his early life at Berkeley, his development of the atomic bomb during World War 2, his guilt and resistance of it being used against Japan, his affairs of heart and his subsequent downfall during the McCarthy era. The book does not focus so much on the man, but more on the human condition of love, guilt, honor, and betrayal that is associated with his life and the people that interacted with him. An introspective book exploring what makes us individuals and what consequences are associated with living a life, whether a scientific genius or a simple confused human being, the book is less a biography than a novel of emotive stories, tenuously connected to Oppenheimer. Enjoyable, well written, and a good read, but if you are interested in a detailed account of the life of Robert Oppenheimer, you would be better served with one of the many conventional biographies written about him.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Intriguing! I like the concept of an elliptical portrait, kind of just looking at the man’s shadow to determine his form (as per the book cover I guess!). However, the self-contained, novella-like chapters gradually swing away from the subject, such that the last one barely mentions him. Which, honestly, is fine—it’s better in concept than in execution. There’s an interesting variation of styles in the chapters, but there’s a sameness about the stories until the last one. That one is worth stayi Intriguing! I like the concept of an elliptical portrait, kind of just looking at the man’s shadow to determine his form (as per the book cover I guess!). However, the self-contained, novella-like chapters gradually swing away from the subject, such that the last one barely mentions him. Which, honestly, is fine—it’s better in concept than in execution. There’s an interesting variation of styles in the chapters, but there’s a sameness about the stories until the last one. That one is worth staying for, but I do wish there weren’t so much in between. I’d maybe recommend reading the first three and then skipping to the end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Miller

    A unique historical fiction novel based on the life of Robert Oppenheimer told from a series of narratives. The narratives are described by seven fictional characters that surround Oppenheimer in his years at Berkeley, Los Alamos and Princeton. Besides being a study of the man and the morality of the atomic bomb it offers a perspective on the politics of the period. A nonlinear plot it requires careful reading.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hillary Copsey

    This is almost a collection of connected short stories as Hall imagines a series of people offering their testimonials about Robert Oppenheimer. It made me want to read more about him and the creation of the atomic bomb. I loved it nearly as much as the first novel by Hall I read, Speak, which I still think about years later.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chaz

    Who would have guessed a book surrounding the creation of the first atomic bomb could be so boring? Made it to page 80 and decided to nuke this one from my bookshelf. Incredibly dull.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Excellent novel. Well written. Thought provoking.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Seven fictional characters give us a 360-degree look at one of the most well-known 20th century scientists, Robert Oppenheimer. published 2018 by Ecco.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Boris Feldman

    Boring.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  18. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Otto

  19. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I really liked this inventive approach to the life of Robert Oppenheimer and the creation of the first atomic bomb.

  20. 4 out of 5

    iwantlisapizza drez

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Speakman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michaeltully

  24. 4 out of 5

    Clara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Blumenthal

  26. 5 out of 5

    ril

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zish

  29. 5 out of 5

    April Knights

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.