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Angie's first auction may turn out to be her last--when she bids on a coat of arms that someone would literally kill to possess . . . Tagging along to an estate sale with her fellow Needlepointer, antiques shop owner Sarah Byrne, Angie Curtis impulsively bids on a tattered embroidery of a coat of arms. When she gets her prize back home to Haven Harbor, she discovers a doc Angie's first auction may turn out to be her last--when she bids on a coat of arms that someone would literally kill to possess . . . Tagging along to an estate sale with her fellow Needlepointer, antiques shop owner Sarah Byrne, Angie Curtis impulsively bids on a tattered embroidery of a coat of arms. When she gets her prize back home to Haven Harbor, she discovers a document from 1757 behind the framed needlework--a claim for a child from a foundling hospital. Intrigued, Angie is determined to find the common thread between the child and the coat of arms. Accepting her reporter friend Clem Walker's invitation to talk about her find on the local TV news, Angie makes an appeal to anyone who might have information. Instead, both women receive death threats. When Clem is found shot to death in a parking lot, Angie fears her own life may be in jeopardy. She has to unravel this historical mystery--or she may be the next one going, going . . . gone . . .


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Angie's first auction may turn out to be her last--when she bids on a coat of arms that someone would literally kill to possess . . . Tagging along to an estate sale with her fellow Needlepointer, antiques shop owner Sarah Byrne, Angie Curtis impulsively bids on a tattered embroidery of a coat of arms. When she gets her prize back home to Haven Harbor, she discovers a doc Angie's first auction may turn out to be her last--when she bids on a coat of arms that someone would literally kill to possess . . . Tagging along to an estate sale with her fellow Needlepointer, antiques shop owner Sarah Byrne, Angie Curtis impulsively bids on a tattered embroidery of a coat of arms. When she gets her prize back home to Haven Harbor, she discovers a document from 1757 behind the framed needlework--a claim for a child from a foundling hospital. Intrigued, Angie is determined to find the common thread between the child and the coat of arms. Accepting her reporter friend Clem Walker's invitation to talk about her find on the local TV news, Angie makes an appeal to anyone who might have information. Instead, both women receive death threats. When Clem is found shot to death in a parking lot, Angie fears her own life may be in jeopardy. She has to unravel this historical mystery--or she may be the next one going, going . . . gone . . .

30 review for Thread Herrings

  1. 4 out of 5

    LORI CASWELL

    Dollycas’s Thoughts Finding treasures at auctions and estate sales is part of the fun, but for Angie Curtis it means MURDER! Her friend, a television reporter is dead and Angie is getting threatened that she will be next. Antique shop owner Sarah Byrne takes Angie to her first auction and she is drawn to a needlework coat of arms. When no one else bids she raises her paddle and takes it home. She takes it out of the frame to see if it can be restored but she finds a real mystery instead, a claim f Dollycas’s Thoughts Finding treasures at auctions and estate sales is part of the fun, but for Angie Curtis it means MURDER! Her friend, a television reporter is dead and Angie is getting threatened that she will be next. Antique shop owner Sarah Byrne takes Angie to her first auction and she is drawn to a needlework coat of arms. When no one else bids she raises her paddle and takes it home. She takes it out of the frame to see if it can be restored but she finds a real mystery instead, a claim from 1757 for a child from a foundling hospital. While researching to see if the child is connected to the family from the auction she runs into Clem Walker who suggests they do a piece on the local news to see if one of the viewers may have information. Angie agrees and even hosts a party so her family and friends can watch her on television. Clem plans a trip to visit Angie in Haven Harbor to discuss the calls the station received. But Clem doesn’t make the meeting, instead, her body is found. Angie knows to find Clem’s killer she has to find who is connected to the coat of arms. The trouble is to keep her safe she is hiding out and it’s hard to investigate anything stuck in a house. There is so much I enjoyed about this story. It had a totally different feel. The Mainely Needlepointers didn’t do hardly any needle pointing but one member of the group, Ruth, is a key player in solving this mystery. Also, Angie accepts that her life is truly in danger after a hairraising event and actually listens to the police and moves to Patrick’s secure home until the killer is caught. As long as she has her cell phone and laptop she can keep investigating and pass along what she finds to the police. At the core of the story are two prominent Maine families. I love the way 79-year-old erotica author Ruth Hopkins knows her way around the genealogy sites. She delves in and finds as much as she can about the families giving Angie plenty of clues and red herrings to sort through. All of Ms. Wait’s characters are interesting, fleshed out and realistic. Most of the recurring characters are very engaging. Patrick is starting to mesh with the rest but still has some work to do. The closer he and Angie get the more he becomes more real to me. The story is pretty fast-paced and filled with suspense. Key characters are truly in danger and I found myself actually holding my breath waiting to read the actual outcome. I know I was reading much faster from about the midpoint on. The author’s descriptions of each person, place, and even the weather were fantastic. She pulls readers right into this story and holds them tight until the final page. OMG, my heart was racing at the ending! Before my accident auctions and needlepoint were two of my favorite things. Finding samplers and other needlework treasures at auctions always made for a great day. I love that both meshed together in this book. This book reads very well all in its own but I always recommend reading series in order to really get to know the characters. This is a wonderful addition to this series. The next book in the series, Thread on Arrival, will be released April 30, 2019.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    Thread Herring is the seventh book in the A Mainely Needlepointer Mystery series. I love this series and feel that Thread Herring is the best so far. It’s February in Haven Harbor and Angie and her friend, Sarah Byrne, are heading to Augusta, ME to attend an antique auction. Sarah will be looking for items for her antique store, while Angie is going along to see what an auction is like and possibly find some embroidery items. At the preview for the auction items, Angie finds an interesting embroi Thread Herring is the seventh book in the A Mainely Needlepointer Mystery series. I love this series and feel that Thread Herring is the best so far. It’s February in Haven Harbor and Angie and her friend, Sarah Byrne, are heading to Augusta, ME to attend an antique auction. Sarah will be looking for items for her antique store, while Angie is going along to see what an auction is like and possibly find some embroidery items. At the preview for the auction items, Angie finds an interesting embroidered coat of arms and time has not been kind to it, but something about it tells her to bid on it. Angie is the only to bid on the item and when she gets home she takes it out of the frame to get a better look at whether any it might be repaired. What she doesn’t expect to find is a folded piece of paper that is a receipt for baby Charles that was left with the London Foundling Hospital in 1757. Angie determines that the coat of arms is unrepairable, but she now wants to find out who baby Charles’ family was. Her boyfriend, Patrick West is going to visit with a sculptor about showing his work and Patrick’s gallery and agrees to drop Angie off in Portland where she will visit the Maine Historical Society. The visit there didn’t give much hope of learning anything. While waiting for Patrick to return she calls a high school classmate, Clem Walker, a reporter at a Portland television station. When Clem hears the story she convinces Angie that they do a short segment to be aired on the station asking viewers to call if they might have any information about baby Charles or the coat of arms. A minute or two after the segment aired, the station received a threat that is Clem and Angie attempted to learn more, they would be killed. The next day the station got another threat and Angie receives a threatening the same thing. Soon, Clem’s lifeless body is found in her car near Harbor Haunts where she and Angie are to have lunch. Then the next day while Angie is talking to Sarah in her store there is an explosion and when she looks outside she finds that the explosion was in her car and is now on fire. Pete Lambert, Haven Harbor policeman and Ethan Trask, Maine State Trooper, are able to convince Angie to stay at Patrick’s house until the killer can be arrested. Since Angie’s computer has been taken by the police, she calls on fellow Maine Needlepointer to help scour the internet looking for clues as to who baby Charles is. As much as Angie wants to be out and about investigating, she knows her life is likely online and stays holed up at Patrick’s, hoping that Ruth will be able to learn who Charles’ family was. As always, Lea Wait provides the reader with a well-researched, well-plotted and told story and believable characters. Wait also provides the reader with the workings of an auction and an insightful look at the London Foundling Hospital. Once again, each chapter has either a description of an embroidered piece or a quote from a publication from 1700-1800’s. A delicious sounding recipe is also included. I am eagerly awaiting the next book in this informative series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    The seventh book in the Needlepoint series is very creative and original for a cozy mystery. I have been reading for 75 years and almost exclusive mysteries since 2013. I have never seen the way the main adventures used in the way. It was a pleasure to read how the protagonist didn't do anything stupid but still managed to solve the crime. Angie Curtis goes to her first auction with her friend Sarah to learn about auctions. Angie sees an old faded needlepoint of a coat of arms and buys it. At ho The seventh book in the Needlepoint series is very creative and original for a cozy mystery. I have been reading for 75 years and almost exclusive mysteries since 2013. I have never seen the way the main adventures used in the way. It was a pleasure to read how the protagonist didn't do anything stupid but still managed to solve the crime. Angie Curtis goes to her first auction with her friend Sarah to learn about auctions. Angie sees an old faded needlepoint of a coat of arms and buys it. At home, she removes the back and a receipt for a child from a foundling nursery in the 1700's and a pink ribbon to identify the child. A chance meeting with a friend who is a TV reporter for a Boston TV station, a one-minute human interest report is made. Shortly, after it airs the station received a message that all who investigate would day. The next Cl Walker is shot in her car. Angie and her friends work to make sure Angie is not hurt. There is an explosion that injured her stepfather and there other strange events. The motive is strange and surprised me. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AND SERIES. One pasta recipe is included. Disclosure: Many thanks to Kensington Books for a review copy. The opinions expressed are my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    The Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series is one of my favorite cozy mystery series. I only pre-order 4 or 5 series because they are my favorites and I don't want to wait to read them. This is a series I pre-order. Why do I like this series so much? First of all, it is a little edgier than other cozy series. Angie was a PI assistant in Arizona before moving back to Maine. She has a Glock that she doesn't carry but is handy if she needs it. In this book, with her life in danger she did take out her G The Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series is one of my favorite cozy mystery series. I only pre-order 4 or 5 series because they are my favorites and I don't want to wait to read them. This is a series I pre-order. Why do I like this series so much? First of all, it is a little edgier than other cozy series. Angie was a PI assistant in Arizona before moving back to Maine. She has a Glock that she doesn't carry but is handy if she needs it. In this book, with her life in danger she did take out her Glock and took it with her. I like the descriptions of Maine. I notice in this book the use of the word wicked a lot. Then I received my L.L. Bean magazine in the mail and they were describing some bedroom slippers as wicked. Yes, I guess it is a Maine descriptive word. I like the characters especially Angie who is smart and independent. She used common sense and tried to stay out of danger's way. The police are portrayed in a positive light which is different than many cozies. This book was suspenseful and page turning. Angie was in real danger. The killing and threats didn't make sense as it all seemed linked to a 250 year old coat of arms needlework in bad shape that was purchased at an auction. Some reviewers have called this book the best of the series. I agree except I must add that book one was my favorite as it drew me into Angie's life. This book is one of the best of the series- right up there with book 1.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    It’s February in Haven Harbor and Angie and her friend, Sarah Byrne, are going to attend an antique auction. Sarah is looking for items for her antique store, while Angie is attending to see what an auction is like and possibly find some needlepoint items. At the preview for the auction items, Angie finds an interesting embroidered coat of arms. It is in poor shape and Sarah tells her it is probably not worth anything, but it calls to her. When she wins the auction, she takes the piece home and It’s February in Haven Harbor and Angie and her friend, Sarah Byrne, are going to attend an antique auction. Sarah is looking for items for her antique store, while Angie is attending to see what an auction is like and possibly find some needlepoint items. At the preview for the auction items, Angie finds an interesting embroidered coat of arms. It is in poor shape and Sarah tells her it is probably not worth anything, but it calls to her. When she wins the auction, she takes the piece home and removes it from the frame. In the backing of the piece, she finds a piece of ribbon and a folded piece of paper that is a receipt for baby Charles who was left at the London Foundling Hospital in 1757. Angie's curiosity kicks in and she decides she would like to find out who Charles is and if he has any relatives living in Maine. This decision sets in motion a chain of events that finds a friend of Angie's dead and her life threatened until she is basically under house arrest for her own safety. It is great to see the familiar characters from previous books all present to varying degrees and willing to help her with her research. This is a great mystery, both the historical and the present day murder. Patrick and Angie are still moving forward with their relationship, but Patrick seems to be a bit overbearing in this book, perhaps due to his desire to keep Angie safe. It was really interesting to see how Ruth is able to use geneology to trace the baby left at the hospital and tie it to a political family. Are they ashamed of their past and want Angie to hush up? There are some red herrings, some obscure clues and lots of computer work used in the pulling together of this mystery. Once again, each chapter begins with an example of work from old samplers worked in colonial and later eras. If this does not interest you, you can skip over it, but I enjoy learning about the needlework of the past as it paints a picture of community, relationships and history. I pretty much figured out who the killer was about halfway through the book, but the motive was left until the end. This book has a lot of tension and suspense as well as relationship building and interactions between the Mainely Needlepointers. I recommend this book to cozy mystery lovers, especially if you enjoy more than one storyline that comes together beautifully at the end. The publisher, Kensington Publishing Corporation, generously provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Ks Book Reviews

    In the Mainely Needlepoint Mysteries, author Lea Wait has created a rich cast of characters that I always look forward to spending time with. It’s been wonderful watching them change and grow over the course of the series. THREAD HERRINGS was a story I couldn’t tear myself away from. A true page turner of a mystery, with questions stemming from past to present, I just became more and more engrossed. There were scenes that were so emotional, I was literally crying, while other scenes found me gas In the Mainely Needlepoint Mysteries, author Lea Wait has created a rich cast of characters that I always look forward to spending time with. It’s been wonderful watching them change and grow over the course of the series. THREAD HERRINGS was a story I couldn’t tear myself away from. A true page turner of a mystery, with questions stemming from past to present, I just became more and more engrossed. There were scenes that were so emotional, I was literally crying, while other scenes found me gasping or holding my breath. Lea Wait can stitch more excitement and intrigue into one book than some authors can into an entire series. The best installment yet, THREAD HERRINGS is proof of that. Truly a book I won’t soon forget.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annie (Under the Covers Book Blog)

    Lea Wait returns with THREAD HERRINGS, the seventh book in the Mainely Needlepoint series. If you’ve read my other reviews for this series before then you may be aware that this series has been a little lukewarm for me. I haven’t ever been fully able to fall in love with this series. However, I also find that I keep picking these books up to try. In this book, I had a lot of the same issues with the previous books that I have read. Although I enjoy the heroine and the community that this series Lea Wait returns with THREAD HERRINGS, the seventh book in the Mainely Needlepoint series. If you’ve read my other reviews for this series before then you may be aware that this series has been a little lukewarm for me. I haven’t ever been fully able to fall in love with this series. However, I also find that I keep picking these books up to try. In this book, I had a lot of the same issues with the previous books that I have read. Although I enjoy the heroine and the community that this series is set in, the pacing of the books are just too slow for me. With Cozy Mysteries in general, this is something that you can expect. However, in comparison to others that I have read, this one has a notoriously slower pace than most of the others. Therefore, I do think it is an exercise in patience to really get through these books. Despite this however, I still come back and I’m not sure why. While these books don’t stand out to me, there’s something comforting about them and that could be why I always pick them up despite not falling in love with them. I think if you’re looking for something to really slow down life and get your mind off something that is irritating you, this is the kind of book that you want. So really, there’s a place for everything and now I know I will pick these books up whenever I’m in need of something more simple and stress-free.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This seventh book in the series focuses on Angie's find at an auction of a tattered embroidery. It is a family's coat of arms dated from the mid 1700's. She soon finds that there is danger attached to this needlework when she begins investigating its history. Will she be its next casualty? I read the first book in the series but not the others until this one so this can be read as a standalone mystery. I felt the fear, terror, and suspense build for Angie as her world becomes more and more confi This seventh book in the series focuses on Angie's find at an auction of a tattered embroidery. It is a family's coat of arms dated from the mid 1700's. She soon finds that there is danger attached to this needlework when she begins investigating its history. Will she be its next casualty? I read the first book in the series but not the others until this one so this can be read as a standalone mystery. I felt the fear, terror, and suspense build for Angie as her world becomes more and more confined to ensure her safety. The other characters are all very supportive of her mission and do their best to help her in any way they can. I also enjoyed the romantic element of the story. I look forward to going back and reading the prior books in this series. Thanks to NetGalley and Kensington for an advance digital copy of this book. My review is voluntary.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Morin

    Thread Herrings by Lea Wait is an amazing addition to this series. I had so many moments of shock that I found myself gasping out loud. Angie attends her first auction, and when her eye is drawn to a particular piece of needlework, she can't resist bidding. This simple piece of work, a coat of arms, is in bad shape, but it's the chain of events that come afterwards that rock Angie's world. The author weaves a vivid tale and her characters are so real, I feel like I know them all. Fans of this series Thread Herrings by Lea Wait is an amazing addition to this series. I had so many moments of shock that I found myself gasping out loud. Angie attends her first auction, and when her eye is drawn to a particular piece of needlework, she can't resist bidding. This simple piece of work, a coat of arms, is in bad shape, but it's the chain of events that come afterwards that rock Angie's world. The author weaves a vivid tale and her characters are so real, I feel like I know them all. Fans of this series will be delighted to read Thread Herrings. I highly recommend this story to all cozy mystery lovers. I can't wait to read the next book in the series. I volunteered to read and review an ARC of this book provided by the publisher and NetGalley.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Thomas

    I’ve dipped my toes into this series in more than one place. I’m known for jumping in anywhere. It’s good to be back, seeing what Angie and the inhabitants of Haven Harbor have been doing. Not having read a few of the previous books, I felt like I’d been away for a while and arrived back in town, among friends, learning what all had happened while I’d been away. I could picture us sitting at a cafe table and everyone rushing to tell me all the latest news. So what’s happening now…. Angie is at an I’ve dipped my toes into this series in more than one place. I’m known for jumping in anywhere. It’s good to be back, seeing what Angie and the inhabitants of Haven Harbor have been doing. Not having read a few of the previous books, I felt like I’d been away for a while and arrived back in town, among friends, learning what all had happened while I’d been away. I could picture us sitting at a cafe table and everyone rushing to tell me all the latest news. So what’s happening now…. Angie is at an antique auction. While perusing the offerings, she comes across a tattered embroidery of a coat of arms. She bids on it and wins. Taking it home, she discovers something hidden in it’s frame and soon after someone is dead and she’s smack in the middle of the investigation. Sorting out the clues is like finding a needle in a haystack, but that doesn’t stop Angie. I admit I was expecting a quick mystery with some fun dialogue and a bit of romance. The author surprised me and took this a step further. There’s a mystery in a mystery, danger around every corner and she really tested the boundaries of her characters. A bit more dark and more suspenseful, this is still a cozy mystery with the quirky characters, small town ambiance and sweet romance that comes with it. I was swept right up, ushered in, offered a chair, and settled myself in for an exciting story. I received a complimentary copy. My review is voluntarily given.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Dunnett

    Angie has an intriguing puzzle to solve in this one, and severe limitations on her sleuthing, since for much of the book she has to stay in hiding to avoid being spotted by the killer who appears to be stalking her. One of the things fans of cozy mysteries enjoy, besides trying to solve a murder along with the amateur detective, is watching the relationships of continuing characters change and grow. There's plenty to satisfy that end of things in THREAD HERRINGS, along with hints of what might h Angie has an intriguing puzzle to solve in this one, and severe limitations on her sleuthing, since for much of the book she has to stay in hiding to avoid being spotted by the killer who appears to be stalking her. One of the things fans of cozy mysteries enjoy, besides trying to solve a murder along with the amateur detective, is watching the relationships of continuing characters change and grow. There's plenty to satisfy that end of things in THREAD HERRINGS, along with hints of what might happen next in the personal lives of Angie and her friend Sarah.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Thread Herrings by Lea Wait is the seventh story in A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series. Angie Curtis is the manager of Mainely Needlepoint in Haven Harbor, Maine. Angie is accompanying her friend, Sarah Byrne to an auction in Augusta. Angie has not been to an auction previously and is looking forward to the experience. Angie is intrigued by a half-finished vintage framed needlepoint coat of arms that is not in the best condition and she spontaneously bids on it when none of the other participa Thread Herrings by Lea Wait is the seventh story in A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series. Angie Curtis is the manager of Mainely Needlepoint in Haven Harbor, Maine. Angie is accompanying her friend, Sarah Byrne to an auction in Augusta. Angie has not been to an auction previously and is looking forward to the experience. Angie is intrigued by a half-finished vintage framed needlepoint coat of arms that is not in the best condition and she spontaneously bids on it when none of the other participants show interest. At home, Angie removes the needlework from the frame and finds a pale silk blue embroidered ribbon along with receipt from the London Foundling Hospital dated October 26, 1757 for a child baptized Charles. Angie wants to learn more about the coat of arms and the child, but she is unsuccessful at the Maine Historical Society. She has lunch with Clem Walker, friend and television reporter, who suggests doing a human interest feature and appeal to the public for information. Instead of receiving helpful material, both ladies receive death threats. Soon Clem is found shot dead in car in Haven Harbor and Angie’s car goes boom injuring someone close to her. Angie goes into hiding, but she this does not deter her from investigating. Can she identify the culprit before he finds her? Thread Herrings can be read alone if you have not indulged in any of the previous novels in A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series. Angie goes to her first auction and her friend, Sarah kindly explains auction protocol. Since I have not been to an auction, I found it interesting. I had no idea there was a buyer’s premium added to the hammer price (winning bid). I could tell the author did her research on the London Foundling Hospital, land patents or grants, the billet or receipt for the child and mementoes parents left behind as identifiers (to later claim the child). Lea Wait incorporated the information in a way that made it easy to understand. Ruth Hopkins helps Angie with genealogy research, but we see very little of the other Mainely Needlepoint group. Patrick West is in town and Angie hides out in his finely appointed carriage house. Personally, I am not a fan of Patrick and I keep hoping they will break up. Patrick comes across as superficial (especially when he was discussing the yacht that could only sleep eight). Angie needs a partner with more depth and who is interested in sleuthing. The mystery plays out with clues interspersed up to the reveal. Angie must solve the mystery via phone since she is unable to go out in public which is a unique way of investigating the crime. Readers are unable to play along and solve this whodunit. I could have done without the frequent (I stopped counting after six) mentions of Angie’s gun (a Glock). Angie does manage to indulge in cooking, dining out friends (before the death threats), drinking fine wine, playing with Trixi (her kitten), watch movies, handle business details and check in with Gram. As the action heats up in Thread Herrings, you will find yourself riveted. You cannot help but keep reading to discover how the story plays out.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gaele

    It’s February and everyone is quietly performing their winter tasks, which means Sarah is visiting several auctions and restocking her shop. Never having been to an auction, Angie goes along – and here we are treated to information about estate auctions from a dealer’s perspective, and see the pieces during the viewing. While Sarah finds pieces that she can resell and use as stock, Angie finds a not-particularly well-preserved piece of needlework, a coat of arms, a rarity in New England. Bidding It’s February and everyone is quietly performing their winter tasks, which means Sarah is visiting several auctions and restocking her shop. Never having been to an auction, Angie goes along – and here we are treated to information about estate auctions from a dealer’s perspective, and see the pieces during the viewing. While Sarah finds pieces that she can resell and use as stock, Angie finds a not-particularly well-preserved piece of needlework, a coat of arms, a rarity in New England. Bidding on the piece, Angie is the winner – and takes the unusual piece home, full of questions. Taking the piece from the frame, Angie finds clues and a mystery hidden behind the piece, all needing more investigation. Discovering the two old Maine families whose items provided the lots for the auction, and some preliminary searching bring Angie to Portland to the history museum, information gathered there gives her new places to search and free hours have her contacting a high school friend turned reporter, and we are off. A one minute spotlight on Angie and her questions about the piece lead to several death threats, the death of her friend Clem, Reverend Thom’s injuries when her car explodes, and danger everywhere. With strangers looking for her in town, footprints around the carriage house that shouldn’t have been there, and a strange couple questioning Sarah about Angie’s piece of embroidery, the questions are never ending. But, frustrated and tired of hiding, an email left by the enquiring couple, a few chance connections made after a news story and cooperation from Sarah bring them face to face with the killer – not quietly as Angie has to use (for the first time) her gun to get Sarah out of danger and be sure the killer is caught. Of course, as in all of this series, insets of work from old samplers worked in colonial and later eras, and the solid feelings of community, friendship and plenty of snow, sea smoke and cold all combine to paint the quaint little town in winter clothes. Wait brings a sense of the place solidly forward while keeping everyone aware of the fact that murder never makes real sense to anyone BUT those willing to kill for something – and in this story the motive of retribution for hurts perceived and done for years was just as silly, even as the tension, questions and information came hard and fast. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stanley McShane

    What an introduction to this author and her series! Ms. Wait really knows her antiques, the business, needlepoint, embroidery, and related samplers and mourning art. The beginning of each chapter includes a child's accounting of a coat of arms (or family crest) embroidery, including familial information. Haven Harbor, Maine, protagonist Angie Curtis of the Mainely Needlepoint shop is invited by her antiques shop owner buddy, Sarah Byrne, to accompany her to an auction. It is her first experience What an introduction to this author and her series! Ms. Wait really knows her antiques, the business, needlepoint, embroidery, and related samplers and mourning art. The beginning of each chapter includes a child's accounting of a coat of arms (or family crest) embroidery, including familial information. Haven Harbor, Maine, protagonist Angie Curtis of the Mainely Needlepoint shop is invited by her antiques shop owner buddy, Sarah Byrne, to accompany her to an auction. It is her first experience with an auction and the author does a fine job of detailing procedures. During the preview, Angie spies an embroidered coat of arms that catches her fancy. It's when Angie gets her prize home and removes the frame that she discovers a billet (receipt) for Charles from the London Foundling Hospital in 1757 on a lovingly embroidered ribbon. (The billet is meant to match the receipt at the hospital in order to reclaim the child.) No problem to read this as a standalone, story-driven plot. Mainely Needlepoint support characters provide historical and genealogical information, along with her grandmother (the latter of whom raised her). Fascinated, Angie begins to research and investigate along with the help of a former classmate, Clem Walker, a TV personality who persuades her to appeal to the public for information. The TV short results in death threats and shortly Clem is murdered and her grandmother's new hubby injured when he attempts to move Angie's car. Angie is forced into hiding and takes her kitty but continues to quietly push for new information. Certainly an opening that grabs the interest quickly and manages to weave informative and educational tidbits into an intriguing, engaging and well-developed plot. The Maine winter descriptions, while brutal, certainly lent an ambiance to the storyline. The antagonist is worked out through persistent and dogged analysis and is not entirely a surprise, but the motive and conclusion comes off a tad weak. I received this ebook download from the publisher and NetGalley and greatly appreciated the opportunity to read and review. I thoroughly enjoyed the history and heartily recommend to any who participate in needlework or crafting of any kind. Will also interest any who read cozy mysteries, suspense, and women sleuths. I'm looking forward to Book 8! 4.5/5 See my full review on https://rosepointpublishing.com

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Douglass

    I was attracted to this mystery because it's set in Maine, where we are currently living. I was entertained to find the characters visiting our town in the first chapter, and dining at an establishment just down the street! (Note: this is a small town in Maine. *Everything* is just down the street). As usual with themed cozies, I wasn't much interested in the featured craft (needlepoint), but that doesn't really matter. No knowledge of needlepoint is needed to enjoy this mystery. As a story, thi I was attracted to this mystery because it's set in Maine, where we are currently living. I was entertained to find the characters visiting our town in the first chapter, and dining at an establishment just down the street! (Note: this is a small town in Maine. *Everything* is just down the street). As usual with themed cozies, I wasn't much interested in the featured craft (needlepoint), but that doesn't really matter. No knowledge of needlepoint is needed to enjoy this mystery. As a story, this is engaging, though I definitely felt the lack of back-story as I was jumping into the series at #7. Still, I cared about the characters and wanted to know what happens to them (and the author's carefully dropped hints about past adventures made me want to go back and start from the beginning). I very much enjoyed the setting, including the comments about how little is open in town during the winter--we have already encountered that reality on some of our excursions out and about! I felt that the mystery was only adequately developed and challenging. I could guess fairly early who might have done the crime, in part because there were so few suspects. What I did appreciate was the far more realistic than usual degree to which Angie cooperates with the police. She's trying to figure things out, but she doesn't go off on a lone-wolf search or deliberately put herself in danger. Kudos to the author for finding a good balance on the amateur detective vs. police scale! One grammatical niggle annoyed me, and I can't decide if it's an editorial failure or a deliberate move to make the first person narrator sound more natural. She consistently uses "I" instead of "me" where it should be the other way ("He'll meet Sarah and I at the shop..."), an error that I admit is common but which bothers me. Aside from that, the book is well-edited, and well-written. My Recommendation: This is a good read for a winter's day by the fire, I think--engaging enough to keep you turning the pages, and light enough to combat the winter darkness. I think it would be even better to start at the beginning of the series and see how Angie got to this point!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Thread Herrings is the seventh installment in the Mainely Needlepoint series featuring Angie Curtis and set in the small town of Heavenly Harbor, ME. Things are quiet in February so Angie agrees to accompany best friend and antique shop owner, Sarah Byrne to an estate auction in neighboring Augusta. Fascinated by a variety of needlework both Sarah and Angie bid on a few items with Angie taking home a faded, half finished Coat of Arms. Upon getting the piece home Angie disassembles the frame and d Thread Herrings is the seventh installment in the Mainely Needlepoint series featuring Angie Curtis and set in the small town of Heavenly Harbor, ME. Things are quiet in February so Angie agrees to accompany best friend and antique shop owner, Sarah Byrne to an estate auction in neighboring Augusta. Fascinated by a variety of needlework both Sarah and Angie bid on a few items with Angie taking home a faded, half finished Coat of Arms. Upon getting the piece home Angie disassembles the frame and discovers a folded paper receipt and accompanying billet for a boy named Charles who had been left at the London Foundling Hospital in 1757. Realizing that there isn't much she can do to repair the needlework, Angie decides to learn more about the baby boy and his parentage. A subsequent trip to the Maine Historical Society proves uninformative, so Angie stops in to visit her high school classmate and Portland TV reporter, Clem Walker. Upon hearing the story Clem convinces Angie to do a short segment on the local news in hopes that someone might recognize the story of the Coat of Arms. That evening, immediately after the news airs, both Clem and Angie begin receiving death threats - someone is determined to stop them from discovering who Charles was. Within a few days, Clem has been murdered, someone has blown up Angie's car, and strange people are lurking in Haven Harbor trying to find Angie. On the advice of Pete Lambert, Haven Harbor's Police Chief and State Police Officer Ethan Trask, Angie agrees to move in temporarily with boyfriend Patrick West behind the locked gates of the West compound. Determined to try and solve the mystery but unable to leave the house, Angie relies on a couple of the Mainely Needlepoint workers for background and genealogical discovery. The author has done quite a bit of research regarding needlepoint and embroidery and historical snippets once again start each chapter, the workings of Foundling Hospitals are explained in detail, and a brief description of auction protocol is included. I am not a fan of Patrick, and sorry to say but I still did not warm up to his character after this latest installment. I was also disappointed that there was not much interaction with the Mainely Needlepoint workers, and only brief conversations between Angie and her grandmother. All in all fast paced story line and well developed plot that will leave series readers happy and looking for the next installment. I received an advanced copy of Thread Herrings from NetGalley via Kensington Publishing. While not required to write a review I am more than happy to offer my honest opinion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    Thread Herrings is my first book in the series, A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery, but I did not have a problem following along as the author gave good background information. The series takes place in Maine during the cold, snowy month of February in the town of Haven Harbor. Angie Curtis has a web business that involves work by a group of needlepointers called Mainely Needlepoint. Angie sells needlepoint items online that the group makes. When her friend and antiques shop owner, Sarah Byrne, invit Thread Herrings is my first book in the series, A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery, but I did not have a problem following along as the author gave good background information. The series takes place in Maine during the cold, snowy month of February in the town of Haven Harbor. Angie Curtis has a web business that involves work by a group of needlepointers called Mainely Needlepoint. Angie sells needlepoint items online that the group makes. When her friend and antiques shop owner, Sarah Byrne, invites Angie to go to an estate auction in Augusta, she decides to go. This is her first auction and she is fascinated by the process and is especially drawn to an old embroidered coat of arms. It is faded and worn, worth very little, if anything but for some reason, she wants it. No one else bid on it, so she was able to buy it. Later, when she took it out of the frame, she found paperwork for a baby left in a foundling hospital two hundred and fifty years ago in 1757. These hospitals took in children that the families could not care for but were able to go back later and get their child back. In the framed coat of arms, was the paperwork for a baby named Charles and there was a ribbon that connected the baby to their family. Angie mentioned her find to her friend, Clem, who is a television reporter. Clem puts together a news small spot for the evening asking for help to find out about the family. Almost immediately after the airing, the station gets threats and later, Angie gets a threatening email on her needlepoint website. Within a day, Clem is murdered and someone is asking for Angie around town. Law enforcement friends encourage Angie to go into hiding so she stays with her boyfriend Patrick while they investigate Clem's murder. This is an interesting story with great characters with small town friendship and support. The plot was well thought out and suspenseful. I was pulled in right away by the action and kept involved to the end. I received an ARC from Kensington Publishing through NetGalley. The thoughts and opinions are mine only.

  18. 5 out of 5

    RO G'ma

    Thread Herrings is the seventh installment in Lea Wait’s Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series and is an engaging, well-plotted mystery with well-developed characters. The writing style flows smoothly at a steady pace, and the book is an easy read. The author is very talented in descriptive writing, and much of the time I was reading, I felt like I was there, watching the activities taking place. There are enough suspects, twists, and turns, to make it difficult to figure out who the killer is. The Thread Herrings is the seventh installment in Lea Wait’s Mainely Needlepoint Mystery series and is an engaging, well-plotted mystery with well-developed characters. The writing style flows smoothly at a steady pace, and the book is an easy read. The author is very talented in descriptive writing, and much of the time I was reading, I felt like I was there, watching the activities taking place. There are enough suspects, twists, and turns, to make it difficult to figure out who the killer is. The story quickly drew me in, and the reveal and ending were surprising. Ms. Wait has provided sufficient character background that allows this book to be read as a standalone. Angie Curtis, who manages Mainely Needlepoint in Haven Harbor, Maine, attends her first auction with her friend, Sarah Byrne, who owns From Here and There. Angie isn’t sure why, but she’s drawn to a badly damaged piece of needlework and feels compelled to bid on it. When she takes the embroidered coat of arms home, she removes it from its frame and discovers a receipt dated October 1757 for a child named Charles who was left at a foundling hospital, and a beautifully embroidered ribbon. Angie learns the foundling hospital was located in London, the ribbon was a called billet, and that anyone relinquishing a child would receive half the billet and would need it to reclaim the child. Clem Walker, Angie’s friend and TV reporter with the local station, interviews her and asks for anyone with information about the needlepoint to contact the station. Within minutes of the airing, the station receives a death threat for Clem, Angie, and anyone who tries to find information about the embroidery or receipt and Angie receives a threatening message through her website. Angie and Clem arrange to meet for lunch the next day to discuss the fact that both received threats. When Clem doesn’t show up for lunch, Angie goes to Sarah’s shop but before she even enters the shop, receives a call from Haven Harbor PD’s Sergeant Pete Lambert, who tells her Clem was found dead in her car and instructing her to stay put with Sarah. Pete and Ethan Trask, her high school crush and a Maine state trooper in the homicide department, insist she doesn’t return to her home. She agrees to spend the night with Sarah, arranges to stay with her boyfriend, Patrick West, for the next few days. The next day, Gram’s new husband, Reverend Tom, is injured when her car explodes. Even though she’s forced into hiding, Angie is determined to learn the history behind the coat of arms and help Pete and Ethan solve the crimes. I received an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley and voluntarily reviewed it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Cole

    I've enjoyed Lea Wait's Mainely Needlepoint cozy series from the beginning. I've painlessly learned a lot about Maine through these books-- from its fascinating history to its landscape and weather to the customs of present-day Mainers. And I am happy to announce, Thread Herrings is the best of the series so far. I loved the reminder of how much fun attending auctions can be, and I can imagine many other readers being tempted to attend their first one from Wait's description of Angie's experienc I've enjoyed Lea Wait's Mainely Needlepoint cozy series from the beginning. I've painlessly learned a lot about Maine through these books-- from its fascinating history to its landscape and weather to the customs of present-day Mainers. And I am happy to announce, Thread Herrings is the best of the series so far. I loved the reminder of how much fun attending auctions can be, and I can imagine many other readers being tempted to attend their first one from Wait's description of Angie's experience at the beginning of the book. But the one thing that takes center stage in Thread Herrings is the mystery. Angie's friend is shot to death on her way to meet Angie at a local restaurant. From strangers asking locals where she lives to death threats by email and other means, it's clear to see that Angie's life is well and truly in danger and Wait skillfully ratchets up the suspense (and the need to read faster to make sure Angie doesn't come to harm). And guess what? Wait doesn't create this palpable tension by having Angie do something stupid! I can't tell you how refreshing that is. Angie gets a bad case of cabin fever, but when the local and state police tell her to stay put and stay inside, she does it-- and the book is still scary and suspenseful. (There are authors who need to make note of this because I'm not the only reader who can't stand characters who are TSTL-- Too Stupid To Live.) The reveal at the end of Thread Herrings is a satisfying one, and now I have to settle down and wait for the next installment. It can't come fast enough for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Thread Herrings is the seventh book in the A Mainely Needlepointer Mystery series. I learned more about needlepoint, Maine, auctions, and people in general. What I found refreshing was that the sleuth did not intentionally make decisions that would put her in harm’s way and that I was constantly saying – are you slow or don’t grasp the severity of your situation? I like Angie Curtiss. I like her background and current desire to run a needlepoint/gift shop. The author did a good job of having me care Thread Herrings is the seventh book in the A Mainely Needlepointer Mystery series. I learned more about needlepoint, Maine, auctions, and people in general. What I found refreshing was that the sleuth did not intentionally make decisions that would put her in harm’s way and that I was constantly saying – are you slow or don’t grasp the severity of your situation? I like Angie Curtiss. I like her background and current desire to run a needlepoint/gift shop. The author did a good job of having me care what happens to the players involve. I also enjoyed that the police were not depicted as incompetent or had grudges against the characters in the book. I was intent on learning why would someone kill over the coat of arms needlepoint. Kept me interested throughout the story. This is a standalone story. I received an Advanced Reader’s Copy from Kensington Publishing Corporation via and these are my own opinions.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carole Jarvis

    Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2zupRrw Thread Herrings by the talented Lea Wait is a top-notch cozy mystery, first class all the way. The narrative is well written, filled with fascinating historical detail, and flows at a steady pace. There’s no fluff or filler; every word is important. Reading the previous stories in this series would have given me a better connection with the regular characters, but Thread Herrings easily stands alone – and the mystery itself is outstanding. Fr Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2zupRrw Thread Herrings by the talented Lea Wait is a top-notch cozy mystery, first class all the way. The narrative is well written, filled with fascinating historical detail, and flows at a steady pace. There’s no fluff or filler; every word is important. Reading the previous stories in this series would have given me a better connection with the regular characters, but Thread Herrings easily stands alone – and the mystery itself is outstanding. From setting to characters and plot, I loved everything about this story. It’s also a clean read, no profanity or graphic scenes. I’m a southerner who would move to New England if my family would agree, so the Haven Harbor, Maine setting was a huge attraction for me. Lea Wait’s love for her state shines in this story as she so vividly conveys scenes and state history that drew me right in. Each chapter begins with an interesting quote, many from needlework samplers of the past. The story begins with Angie and Sarah on their way to an antique auction, where Angie is drawn to a well-worn coat of arms. The author brings in a lot of detail relating to auctions, which I found enjoyable. What starts out as a fun trip and shopping experience soon builds into danger and non-stop action, making the story hard to put down. Angie’s investigation into a friend’s murder is complicated when she has to go into hiding because of death threats, relying on the online investigative skills of her delightful friend, Ruth. More fascinating history comes into play as two prominent Maine families, with ties to England and a foundling hospital in the 1700s, are linked to present-day events, including murder. The mystery theme itself is captivating, elevating Thread Herrings to the top of the cozy mystery genre. Lea Wait is an excellent author and I’m eager to read more of her mysteries, including her other series involving antique prints. Thread Herrings goes on my favorites list. Highly recommended. I received a copy of this book through Great Escapes Tours. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    Threads Herring is the 7th book in the Mainely Needlepoint series, and another great adventure with Angie Curtis and the gang. Angie goes to her first auction with her friend Sarah, owner of an antique shop. Angie bids on an old coat of arms embroidery, and wins. Soon after Angie goes on her friend Clem's news show to ask for help identifying the coat of arms. When Clem is murdered and Angie is targeted the murderer must be found. I love this series, but the mystery and ending was not very excit Threads Herring is the 7th book in the Mainely Needlepoint series, and another great adventure with Angie Curtis and the gang. Angie goes to her first auction with her friend Sarah, owner of an antique shop. Angie bids on an old coat of arms embroidery, and wins. Soon after Angie goes on her friend Clem's news show to ask for help identifying the coat of arms. When Clem is murdered and Angie is targeted the murderer must be found. I love this series, but the mystery and ending was not very exciting in my opinion, but I am looking forward to the next book in the series. If you love cozy mysterious, give this book/series a try. As always it's better to read the series in order. I received this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Who knew purchasing a threadbare needlepoint sampler at an auction could be so troublesome. There's a coat of arms on the sampler, unusual because coats of arms usually were found in England, not in the United States. Angie discovers a document dated from the 1750s behind the framed needlepoint work. It was a claim for a child who had been left at a foundling home in England. Her news reporter friend Clem talks Angie into going on TV to talk about the sampler. Next day, someone is dead. Another Who knew purchasing a threadbare needlepoint sampler at an auction could be so troublesome. There's a coat of arms on the sampler, unusual because coats of arms usually were found in England, not in the United States. Angie discovers a document dated from the 1750s behind the framed needlepoint work. It was a claim for a child who had been left at a foundling home in England. Her news reporter friend Clem talks Angie into going on TV to talk about the sampler. Next day, someone is dead. Another excellent mystery in this terrific series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Who would expect a piece of needlework from 1750s London on auction in Maine would lead to murder in .....Maine? Wow. This installment of an interesting cozy series has Angie and her friends rightly fearing for their lives even as they try to determine the identity of baby Charles and why he is so important all these years later. The mystery is well done and Wait has fleshed it out by opening each chapter with an appropriate quote or piece of needlework. The characters are well done, the menace Who would expect a piece of needlework from 1750s London on auction in Maine would lead to murder in .....Maine? Wow. This installment of an interesting cozy series has Angie and her friends rightly fearing for their lives even as they try to determine the identity of baby Charles and why he is so important all these years later. The mystery is well done and Wait has fleshed it out by opening each chapter with an appropriate quote or piece of needlework. The characters are well done, the menace surprisingly realistic, and all in all it's a good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. Don't worry if you haven't read the earlier books- you'll be fine with this as a standalone. Oh, and there's a recipe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    JoAnne McMaster (Any Good Book)

    When Angie Curtis attends an auction with her best friend Sarah Byrne, she doesn't expect to find anything in particular. But on an impulse she purchases an old needlework embroidery of a coat and arms. Even though Sarah tells her it isn't worth much, Angie decides she likes it and takes it home. When she removes the frame she finds what turns out to be a piece of ribbon that identifies a child from a foundling hospital. When she investigates further she discovers that it originated in England. S When Angie Curtis attends an auction with her best friend Sarah Byrne, she doesn't expect to find anything in particular. But on an impulse she purchases an old needlework embroidery of a coat and arms. Even though Sarah tells her it isn't worth much, Angie decides she likes it and takes it home. When she removes the frame she finds what turns out to be a piece of ribbon that identifies a child from a foundling hospital. When she investigates further she discovers that it originated in England. She decides to do a little more digging but the historical society is unable to help; running into her friend Clem Walker - a reporter for a television station - yields at least some sort of answer. Clem puts her on the air to talk about her find but the response they receive isn't one they're waiting for. Death threats ensue, and while Angie is shaken, she thinks at first it must be a crank. But when she's supposed to meet Clem for lunch and the woman doesn't show up, it's not long after that she's found dead in her car, with an embroidery needle in her neck, leaving the threat to Angie's life taken seriously.. But when another tragedy strikes it's apparent to everyone that Angie's life is in danger, so she's convinced to hide out until the killer is found, having no contact with her friends or family unless by phone. But it's not long before she starts to feel caged; and since she has nothing but time on her hands, she slowly starts to put the pieces together of who wants her dead. But the why eludes her, and unless she can convince a killer to confess, someone just could get away with murder... I can't tell you how thoroughly I enjoyed this book. We get to see how Angie reacts when she's not only faced with a life-or-death situation, trying to figure out why someone would kill for a badly kept piece of embroidery. She's used to being independent and for the first time must actually do what the police say and keep out of sight, even if it is in a beautiful place with Patrick. Most of the "action" actually takes place through telephone calls which makes it a little unique in the fact that the protagonist didn't go out and stumble across clues. They were given through conversations (and a little bit of Internet research), which I thought was quite interesting. When Angie finally puts everything together she has a difficult time convincing people to believe her, but I think that only made the book more plausible and it showed that the author is able to convey a story without putting the main character through a bunch of false steps before figuring out the truth. I liked the fact that for those of us who have never been to an auction (nor probably will ever have a true desire to do so) the steps leading to the auction itself were explained, as I didn't realize that there was an 'order' that must be done (although I did know that one can't just go in, sit down and raise a paddle to bid). When the ending comes and we ourselves learn the truth, it is a tale as old as time, but a sad one nonetheless, and shows us to what extent some will go to in order get what they want. As the seventh book in the series, it is just as good as the previous ones, and Ms. Wait is indeed able to craft a story that keeps you reading throughout, wanting to know where the tale will lead. I look forward to the next in the series. Recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Larson

    Thread Herrings By: Lea Wait Kensington Books 3 Stars Angie Curtis, the owner of Mainely Needlepoint, was invited to her first auction by her friend, Sarah Byrne, an antique shop owner. Angie was fascinated by the great variety of items up for auction, and those bidding on the auctions. She specifically expressed some interest in all of the needlepoints, but it was a badly damaged embroidered coat of arms that truly intrigued her. She bid on it and won it. When she got home, she unframed it and foun Thread Herrings By: Lea Wait Kensington Books 3 Stars Angie Curtis, the owner of Mainely Needlepoint, was invited to her first auction by her friend, Sarah Byrne, an antique shop owner. Angie was fascinated by the great variety of items up for auction, and those bidding on the auctions. She specifically expressed some interest in all of the needlepoints, but it was a badly damaged embroidered coat of arms that truly intrigued her. She bid on it and won it. When she got home, she unframed it and found a folded piece of paper with a blue silk ribbon in it. The paper was a “receipt” for a boy named “Charles” who was left at the Foundling Hospital in England in 1757. Angie was puzzled by the paper and the coat of arms. She wanted to find out the story behind them. Her friend, Clem, who worked at the local new station, suggested she participate in a short piece about the items in order to ask viewers to help her solve the mystery. That was when her troubles began. A threat was sent to the news station that warned that Clem and Angie would be killed if they didn’t leave the story alone. The next day, Clem was found dead. Even with her guilt over Clem’s death, Angie was still determined to solve the mystery. Will she be able to solve it before she winds up dead as well? I thought this book had a very riveting plot. The author does a great job with the rising action of the story. The intensity of the plot becomes more and more desperate, and the urgency builds and builds. It was one of those books that is hard to put down because you have to find out what happens next. A unique detail in this story is that Angie is in hiding for almost all of the climbing action, and she therefore has to rely almost solely on her phone to help her solve the mystery. We don’t often find cozy mystery sleuths that do almost all of their investigating with a phone. There are two main ingredients this book is missing though: suspects and motives. We have to wait all the way until the end until we find out who and why. There is never really a suspect list, and no way for the reader to figure out “whodunit?” When we are finally given a possible suspect there still isn’t a viable motive. It isn’t until the suspect actually describes what happens that he also reveals the why, and the why seems a little far fetched. So even though the ending was a little weak, I would still recommend this book to cozy mystery lovers. Thanks to Net Galley & Kensington Books for an ARC of this book. #NetGalley #ThreadHerrings

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    THREAD HERRINGS: A Legitimate struggle with Illlegitimacy http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Wow, needlepoint just got dangerous! As with the other books in the series, this Mainely Needlepoint book is filled with Maine charm. I’ve been to an auction, much like the one Angie and Sara attend. I thought the plot in here was interesting and unusual. Patrick and Angie’s differences are highlighted by the kinds of people they have lunch with: Patrick with a yacht builder, And Angie has a lunch da THREAD HERRINGS: A Legitimate struggle with Illlegitimacy http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Wow, needlepoint just got dangerous! As with the other books in the series, this Mainely Needlepoint book is filled with Maine charm. I’ve been to an auction, much like the one Angie and Sara attend. I thought the plot in here was interesting and unusual. Patrick and Angie’s differences are highlighted by the kinds of people they have lunch with: Patrick with a yacht builder, And Angie has a lunch date with Clem, an old friend from high school. One wants to know what the thread(red) herrings are in the story, well that would be giving it away. I found it a delightful congruence of Maine politics, although I was very sorry Clem was killed in the course of the story and that this old, pretty ruined, bit of needlepoint and a seriously dysfunctional family, was the cause. But, what interested me really was the history and the amount of research that would have been required. Therfe’s much about the Foundling Hospital were really interesting. This theme of illegitimacy and issues with the the British social welfare system is common in the series. I found some related images and include them here. Angie, herself, was raised by a single mother, and never knew her father. Like Angie, we don’t get all the answers to the story. Another character’s life is not what Angie understood it to be. Even a sweet little town like Haven Harbor has its share of secrets. I think the story here ended a little abruptly, and a was a little thin. It was a bit too convenient and out of left field. But, there are plenty of crazy events that happen here in Maine and around the world. There are several heart stopping moments in this story a little more danger and action than in previous volumes in the series. The stories are a little darker than a lot of cozies. There’s also a little more romance, but it’s still clean. After all, Angie’s Grandmother is married to a minister. I always enjoy these mysteries — the characters, the views of Maine, the needlepoint references at the top of each chapter, the historical research, and Angie’s journey back to her home.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    It's February in Haven Harbor ME, and things are quiet in Angie Curtis' needlepoint business and in her friend Sarah's antique business. Sarah, however, uses the quiet months when there are no tourists to attend auctions and stock up for the busy months. Angie is excited to participate in her first estate auction, with an eye to possibly purchase a historical sampler or two. She quickly finds that those included are out of her price range, but what catches her eye is a poorly framed and deterior It's February in Haven Harbor ME, and things are quiet in Angie Curtis' needlepoint business and in her friend Sarah's antique business. Sarah, however, uses the quiet months when there are no tourists to attend auctions and stock up for the busy months. Angie is excited to participate in her first estate auction, with an eye to possibly purchase a historical sampler or two. She quickly finds that those included are out of her price range, but what catches her eye is a poorly framed and deteriorated embroidery of a coat of arms. She is fascinated because it is unusual to see such an embroidery in America. The bidding is fierce, but no one else is interested, and Angie wins the piece. When she takes it apart, she finds an envelope with a "billet" dating back to 1757 describing the admission of an infant named Charles to a foundling hospital and an embroidered ribbon. Incurably curious, Angie sets out to find out what foundling hospital, what happened to Charles, and how the embroidery ended up in Maine. To this end, she enlists all her friends at Mainely Needlepoint, and even mentions it to her friend, Clem, at the local TV station. Clem thinks it would make an excellent short piece for her broadcast. Little do they know that the show will lead to death threats, murder, a bombing and Angie going into hiding. Lea Wait has written another entertaining mystery in the Mainely Needlepoint series, packed with local color and quirky, interesting characters. As a long time visitor to Maine (both summer and winter) Haven Harbor is authentic to me. I always get good ideas for places to visit, this time the sampler collection at the Saco Museum. There is more than a dash of developing romance this time, both for Angie and Sarah. I highly recommend the entire series and hope for more. Thanks to Kensington Books and NetGalley.com for an advance digital copy. The opinions are my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    THREAD HERRINGS by Lea Wait is a Mainely Needlepoint Mystery. It is the 7th title in this very clever ‘cozy mystery’ series. I don’t always have a ‘cozy’ relationship with cozy mysteries. I have liked some series and loathed others. But I do like this particular one. (Maybe because I live in Maine and Leah Wait also lives in Maine.) The titles are extremely clever - TWISTED THREADS, THREADS OF EVIDENCE, THREAD AND GONE, DANGLING BY A THREAD, TIGHTENING THE THREADS, THREAD THE HALLS and the curren THREAD HERRINGS by Lea Wait is a Mainely Needlepoint Mystery. It is the 7th title in this very clever ‘cozy mystery’ series. I don’t always have a ‘cozy’ relationship with cozy mysteries. I have liked some series and loathed others. But I do like this particular one. (Maybe because I live in Maine and Leah Wait also lives in Maine.) The titles are extremely clever - TWISTED THREADS, THREADS OF EVIDENCE, THREAD AND GONE, DANGLING BY A THREAD, TIGHTENING THE THREADS, THREAD THE HALLS and the current THREAD HERRINGS. The locale is coastal Maine and Ms. Wait has captured the sense of place very well. The characters are pretty believable and while the plots can be a bit thin, they, too, are believable. I like the embroidery and needlepoint themes throughout the books. Each chapter gives an example of a historical piece of needlework. I also like the references to real towns and cities, highways and restaurants, local history and customs. Angie Curtis and her friend Sarah are attending an auction and Angie bids on a tattered piece of embroidery that catches her attention. It is a coat of arms. Her interest leads to many questions - Can it be restored? Who did it belong to? Where is it from originally? What is the mysterious piece of paper and ribbon hidden in the frame? Angie’s sleuthing leads her to the Maine Historical Society in Portland and a Foundling Hospital in London. But why would someone be stalking her and her friends, trying to retrieve this piece of embroidery? Leah Wait is known for her excellent historical fiction (set in Maine) for elementary and middle school students. She also writes for adults.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Book

    Lea Wait spins a great yarn and Thread Herrings is an intriguing mystery. Angie Curtis, owner of Mainely Needlepoint, accompanies friend and antique shop owner Sarah Byrne to an estate auction in Augusta. The adventure begins when Angie purchases a needlepoint of a coat of arms that is in bad shape but intrigues Angie. Angie discovers a receipt for a foundling from 1757 and sets out to try and track down the family. She runs into Clem, a TV reporter with the local station who interviews her and a Lea Wait spins a great yarn and Thread Herrings is an intriguing mystery. Angie Curtis, owner of Mainely Needlepoint, accompanies friend and antique shop owner Sarah Byrne to an estate auction in Augusta. The adventure begins when Angie purchases a needlepoint of a coat of arms that is in bad shape but intrigues Angie. Angie discovers a receipt for a foundling from 1757 and sets out to try and track down the family. She runs into Clem, a TV reporter with the local station who interviews her and asks for anyone with information about the needlepoint to contact the station. Within hours the station receives death threats for both Clem and Angie. Angie and Clem arrange to meet for lunch the next day to discuss the fact that both have received more threats overnight. When Clem doesn’t show up for lunch, Angie goes to visit Sarah to determine how to find out more about the coat of arms and the paper. While at Sarah’s the police call and inform her that Clem has been found murdered. The police insist she find a safe place to stay until they can track down whoever is behind the death threats. The next day, Rev. Tom, her Gram’s new husband is injured when he goes to retrieve Angie’s car and it explodes and burns up. Obviously, this is a suspense filled story that keeps pages turning until the very end. The characters and relationships are well-developed and realistic. Ms. Wait has a way with words, fabricating a community that feels comfortable and welcoming. As always, sitting with a Mainely Needlepoint Mystery is a relaxing joy.

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