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Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein

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A new anthology bringing together five great new and established writers to explore the world of Mary Shelley’s all-time classic, Frankenstein “My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.” Victor Frankenstein was the first to unlock the key to life, but he would not be the last. Through two centuries of scientific enquiry and re A new anthology bringing together five great new and established writers to explore the world of Mary Shelley’s all-time classic, Frankenstein “My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.” Victor Frankenstein was the first to unlock the key to life, but he would not be the last. Through two centuries of scientific enquiry and relentless advancement, five more minds found the secret, and five more creatures were made. Five more stories ended in tragedy. From the 1840s to the modern day, from the race to publish the first anatomy to the desperate search for weapons to win the Second World War, telling the stories of the creatures that never were.


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A new anthology bringing together five great new and established writers to explore the world of Mary Shelley’s all-time classic, Frankenstein “My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.” Victor Frankenstein was the first to unlock the key to life, but he would not be the last. Through two centuries of scientific enquiry and re A new anthology bringing together five great new and established writers to explore the world of Mary Shelley’s all-time classic, Frankenstein “My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.” Victor Frankenstein was the first to unlock the key to life, but he would not be the last. Through two centuries of scientific enquiry and relentless advancement, five more minds found the secret, and five more creatures were made. Five more stories ended in tragedy. From the 1840s to the modern day, from the race to publish the first anatomy to the desperate search for weapons to win the Second World War, telling the stories of the creatures that never were.

49 review for Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Creatures is a fantastic collection of five stories from five relatively unknown authors, each one contributing a top-notch masterful piece of literature. If you think a book about Frankenstein stories is going to be some cheap Seventies-era paperback trash, you're wrong. The depth and literary quality of each and every one of these five tales is impressive. Based on Mary Shelley's fascinating tale of a mad scientist playing God by building a new creature from body parts, these authors have capt Creatures is a fantastic collection of five stories from five relatively unknown authors, each one contributing a top-notch masterful piece of literature. If you think a book about Frankenstein stories is going to be some cheap Seventies-era paperback trash, you're wrong. The depth and literary quality of each and every one of these five tales is impressive. Based on Mary Shelley's fascinating tale of a mad scientist playing God by building a new creature from body parts, these authors have captured the mad doctor/ mad scientist essence, but taken the idea in wildly different directions. There's a story about mad experiments by doctors in a secret prison room, creating something from body parts. There's a story about introducing a new creature, the first new woman, an Eve if you will, into high society and to ballroom affairs. Eve is nothing like you'd expect such a creature to be. There's a story about a lonely boy in the English countryside during the Second World War, a coming of age tale, that touches on horror. There's a story featuring a British detective searching for the thief who stole a corpse's arm right out of the grave behind the church. Elementary, my dear Watson. And, there's the story about the Doctors Without Borders cruise, the strangest, most magical boat ride ever imagined. Each of these stories is poetic in imagery, evocative in mood, and beautifully written. Not your classic scary horror because, of course, we readers have some idea about the creatures being designed. But, fully imaginative and worth reading more than once. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review. A surprising gem.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Burns

    3 Stars Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* I feel like I should preface this review by saying I don’t read a lot of anthologies because short stories don’t always work well for me. But I LOVE Frankenstein retellings—the original is a book with so many thought-provoking aspects to explore—so this anthology in particular had so much potential for me, and I couldn’t pass it up. Especially since these stories are on the longer side, which means 3 Stars Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* I feel like I should preface this review by saying I don’t read a lot of anthologies because short stories don’t always work well for me. But I LOVE Frankenstein retellings—the original is a book with so many thought-provoking aspects to explore—so this anthology in particular had so much potential for me, and I couldn’t pass it up. Especially since these stories are on the longer side, which means more chance for me to connect with them and for them to leave an impression. As is usually the case with anthologies, I liked some stories more than others. More thoughts on the individual stories are in the hidden section below, but there were two that stood out to me the most: “Made Monstrous” was my favorite for its story, characters, and mystery, and “Love Thee Better” had the most creative take on the Frankenstein idea and was easily the most disturbing of the bunch. *SPOILER ALERT: My thoughts on the individual stories may contain mild spoilers.* (view spoiler)[In “Kaseem’s Way” by Tade Thompson, a man uses Victor’s notes to figure out how to make his own creation, and the original monster himself makes an appearance. I didn’t dislike it, but it didn’t leave an impression either. But it did relate to the original because of the whole creature thing, the theme of abandonment, and the way it was another case of, “If only he hadn’t [done that violence], then maybe [he could’ve found some happiness].” In “The New Woman” by Rose Biggin, a couple combines taxidermy and science to resurrect a beautiful woman. This one achieved the disturbing factor present in the original better than the previous story. It was also kind of a nod/twist to the original that their “creature” was so perfectly beautiful that they thought of her as art. Victor tried to make his beautiful in the original, but he failed spectacularly, whereas these two succeeded. This story didn’t blow me away either, but it raised some questions about art and beauty and humanity and what the creature would really be if you were to resurrect or piece together a person. In “Reculver” by Paul Meloy, a man recalls his young life and his run-in with a monster. To be honest, I didn’t entirely “get” this one. And the Frankenstein aspect was weak. The main relation I can see is that idea of, “Who’s the real monster?” since there was a “monster” but also a very human monster in this one. In “Made Monstrous” by Emma Newman, a detective takes on a case involving stolen body parts. This was my favorite in terms of story and characters, despite being more mystery than sci-fi or horror. The story had this great mystery that pulled me in and made me want to keep reading. It also had characters that I liked. It tackled the topic of sexual abuse and harassment. The female characters, and the whole story, provided a great feminist perspective. I even managed to connect to the MC some and feel some emotion at the end. This one also had that element of “Who’s the real monster?” as well as some sewn-together body parts. In “Love Thee Better” by Kaaron Warren, a couple goes on a macabre cruise like no other. This was the most creepy and disturbing of the bunch, and one of the ones that adhered to the original Frankenstein monster idea the best. The whole thing had an uncanny, dreamlike feel. It pushed my suspension of disbelief really far that the characters would act the way they did, but I think this one was the best story in terms of mood and creativity. (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER* One of the things I liked about this anthology overall was that there was a lot of inclusivity/diversity/representation. The first story had POC main characters (Black and Hindu). The second had LGBT+ main characters (a F/F couple). The third had a disabled main character (a limp). The fourth had a main character who was a survivor of sexual abuse and possibly had PTSD or something similar from it, and it was also very feminist. I also appreciated that each story had a connection in some way to the original story, whether through theme or actually attaching body parts together, although some had a stronger connection than others. There was also a lot of variety. Each story was set in a different time. They varied a bit in genre too; if I were to classify, I’d say two were sci-fi, one was horror, one was mystery, and one was mostly just historical fiction. And all the stories had different premises. Unfortunately, altogether, the anthology fell flat for me. A couple of the stories captured some of that disturbing quality of the original, one pulled me in with a great mystery, and one was creative in a horrifying way, but I wanted more from this book. More of the sci-fi/horror element. More disturbingness or thought-provokingness or emotion. Maybe I was expecting too much from short stories. Or maybe I just didn’t understand the meaning in each one and what the authors were trying to convey. All I know for sure is that I wasn’t gripped by most of these. But I think each story did have its merits, and other readers may enjoy this book more than I did. Recommended For: Anyone who likes short stories, a variety of genres, and Frankenstein-inspired stories. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leseparatist

    I read this book courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley. All opinions are my own. A collection of stories about Frankenstein's Monster, published right in time for the 200th anniversary of the original monster's conception, offers a rich range of reinterpretations and rewritings. Themes of monstrosity are a given, but we have the relationship between creator and creation, too, and sexism, and autonomy, and consent. And I was, for the most part, impressed with the five authors' takes. The first st I read this book courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley. All opinions are my own. A collection of stories about Frankenstein's Monster, published right in time for the 200th anniversary of the original monster's conception, offers a rich range of reinterpretations and rewritings. Themes of monstrosity are a given, but we have the relationship between creator and creation, too, and sexism, and autonomy, and consent. And I was, for the most part, impressed with the five authors' takes. The first story, Tade Thompson's "Kaseem's Way", was my surprising favourite. It was markedly not my kind of story, but regardless of that, and despite its relatively straightforward relationship with the source text, the story impressed me on the strenght of the writing and thematic resonance. This tale of racially discriminated outcasts devoted to the goal of creating life by artificial means, interspersed with 1st person fragments concerning Victor Frankenstein's original creature, still alive after all these years and looking for his brother, was detailed and rich, with well-fleshed characters and a coherent narrative. By contrast, I'm afraid I found Rose Biggin's "The New Woman" thorougly disappointing. Yes, I know the references, I see the significance of the title, but still, this sapphic re-telling focused on desire, misogyny and the intersection between art and science somehow became flimsy and shallow, and vague. Its characters (other than the sculptor) were two-dimensional, and their relationships felt contrived. Its worldbuilding was haphazard and spoilt suspension of disbelief. A waste of an imaginative and promising point of departure. The third text was better, but not by much. In "Reculver" by Paul Meloy, the writing worked, and the narrative was stronger and with a good sense of place, but I disliked the ending. (view spoiler)[The Gaimanesque Murder Mystery-ish quality, the interpretation that the narrator's guilt is not misplaced but perhaps insufficient? Hard pass. (hide spoiler)] Emma Newman's "Made Monstrous" is an alright detective story and a good character study, but feels underdeveloped. I thought the final plot twist didn't work because of how obvious it was, and yet treated like a revelation for a reader. There was not enough mystery in the entire narrative, and using an established backstory for the finale just didn't have the punch, particularly when the confrontation took place at the beginning. I still like Newman, but I don't think this was her strongest showcase. The final story wasn't my favourite and I wish some elements thereof had been edited down or out. It deals with consent, and yet doesn't quite have much to say on the subject. But the atmosphere of "Love Thee Better" by Kaaron Warren and her use of the original's material made it perhaps the best fitted for this anthology. Sent on an endless and oneiric cruise with her one-armed husband, the protagonist gradually reveals the horrors of this trip, as boundaries between natural and unnatural, dead and living, autonomous and enslaved, innocent and complicit become porous and unreliable. I didn't like the ending, or not quite, but it engaged well with Frankenstein. My overall grade may not seem high, but I look forward to reading more from both Thompson and Warren.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    I absolutely love Frankenstein retellings and I think I've only read one before that I didn't adore ...but unfortunately I'm going to have to add this anthology to that list. None of the stories were really amazing and although it's only been a few days since I read this, only one of them really stands out in my memory in any way. Weirdly enough the three stories by female authors were the ones that I liked while the two by male authors I thought were pretty lacking. I don't know if it was becau I absolutely love Frankenstein retellings and I think I've only read one before that I didn't adore ...but unfortunately I'm going to have to add this anthology to that list. None of the stories were really amazing and although it's only been a few days since I read this, only one of them really stands out in my memory in any way. Weirdly enough the three stories by female authors were the ones that I liked while the two by male authors I thought were pretty lacking. I don't know if it was because of the short length of the stories or something else but I just couldn't get into this as much as I wanted to.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Williams

    4.5 of 5 stars https://lynns-books.com/2018/10/19/cr... I’m not shy about telling all and sundry prepared to listen (or too polite to make a hasty departure) that short fiction is not usually my thing. I don’t know why, other than usually I find that I’m just becoming involved and the conclusion happens. However, I have also found recently that when a book, short or otherwise, adds to an already developed story, or continues using the original story for inspiration then I enjoy it much more. Monst 4.5 of 5 stars https://lynns-books.com/2018/10/19/cr... I’m not shy about telling all and sundry prepared to listen (or too polite to make a hasty departure) that short fiction is not usually my thing. I don’t know why, other than usually I find that I’m just becoming involved and the conclusion happens. However, I have also found recently that when a book, short or otherwise, adds to an already developed story, or continues using the original story for inspiration then I enjoy it much more. Monstrous Little Voices was the first such book that led me down this path of enjoyment (a book that uses Shakespeare for inspiration and where all the short stories are interconnected in some way). The same can be said for Creatures. Before I even start this review my immediate thoughts were that I loved the idea behind Frankenstein and his legacy. This collection of five tales is the perfect way to keep this story thriving in a really original way. I love the classics but I understand that some people like a more modern style of writing – here you find an updated story that brings a classic into the 21st century. The stories make their way throughout history beginning around the 1850s (I think) and progressing into the modern day. All the stories have a different concept and yet all are brought together, not only by the common thread of ‘playing God’ or discovering immortality but by the inclusion of something familiar in each story. I’ll try not to give away too much in case of spoilers but due to the chronology of the stories and also the way they’re woven together I would suggest that readers tackle this in a straightforward story (unlike most short story collections where you can pick any story at will). To be clear, I’m not saying you can’t pick and choose at will but I think the stories will be better enjoyed read in the order they’ve been published. So, we have five tales and undoubtedly readers will like some more than others. What I really like is that these stories take the work created by Shelley and through the collection bring it uptodate whilst shining a light on some modern nuances that I didn’t expect. Kaseem’s Way is the start of the collection and harks back to a time in London when grave robbing was not uncommon. Cadavers were needed for research purposes as demand outweighed supply sometimes gruesome deeds were committed in the name of science. This is a perfect start to the story with it’s dark feel and fog enshrined streets. We read of Kaseem and his fascination with anatomy. He undertakes ‘research’ in secret within the close confines of Newgate Prison. His benefactor is a doctor at Guy’s Hospital who seeks to make a name for himself and seems to have an interest in the reanimation of the dead. Meanwhile we meet a character known as Adam. Adam is full of hate, he’s also full of loneliness and is desperately sad. On top of that, and quite unfairly, he seems to be slowly dying. I really enjoyed this story, it contains nods to the original work (although I’m sure I probably missed more than I picked up upon) and it is definitely something of a tragedy. The New Woman takes us forward in time to 1899 – Christmas time and the last days of the year before a new year and indeed a new era is about to begin. A group of friends are enjoying Christmas dinner, bohemians one and all, artists, actresses, scientists and like minded. Their discussion gives rise to the birth of an idea in the minds of one of the guests. Fran and her partner Christine come up with a way to combine art and science. Their creation is Eve. This was a period that was strangely beguiled by the curious and the odd. Collections of wonders and the like were sought after and Fran and Christine’s ‘creation’ is highly desired to turn what was going to be a wondrous New Year party into, quite possibly, THE event of the year. This is a tale that starts off as the coming together of two minds to create something beautiful. Unfortunately, neither of them really expected their idea to come to fruition and didn’t have the first clue what to do when they succeeded. Ultimately, their creation created a rift where a jealous wedge found a perfect home. A story that takes a careful look at ‘rights’. Does the ‘creature’ have rights – should it/she be treated as human or is she simply a ‘thing’. Reculver. The third tale is a curious one and takes a slightly different tack. Set during the Second World War this story is told by a now elderly gentleman as he recounts a period during his youth in which he met two strangers. One, was Barnes Wallis – who was responsible for inventing the Bouncing Bombs – later known as the Dam Busters. The other stranger was the one that graces the pages of each of these stories. This is a tale of violence – and surprisingly during a time of war does not focus on the battlefield. This is about domestic violence and looking at the monsters who live amongst us. I was puzzled about the inclusion of Barnes §Wallis (although I admit it’s a nice touch) but then I figured he’s the scientist of the story. As the the other tales there is a recurring theme of sadness and loss I’m still not quite sure what to make of the ending and think I might need to read it again. Made Monstrous brings us into the 80s where a slightly jaded detective and his young rookie investigate the stealing of limbs. This story really gripped me. I’m not going to give too much away – it’s not a murder mystery because the bodies that are stolen from are already dead, but nonetheless it is a mystery. At first the jaded detective takes almost a half hearted stance into the mystery of it all until the young policewoman starts to uncover certain similarities that eventually lead the two on a strange mission. I found this story really gripping. I wasn’t expecting a police procedural to be included amongst these stories and yet it fits really well. Again, there are monsters of differing guises included in the story just giving more fuel to the ‘who was really the monster’ discussion. Love Thee Better. The final story is all about obsession. I’m not quite sure when this is set – present day or a near future but it’s all about the way people obsess about their body. Poor self deception and thinking that the cut of a knife will make things better. Set aboard a strange cruise ship that never seems to call in at port this is a heady mix of people enjoying themselves quite wildly and with absolute abandon and then almost becoming saturated with it all. It’s a story of people wanting to lose parts of themselves and others wanting to have those parts. It’s a very unusual and even a little bit disturbing story of people swapping body parts almost as casually as they would change their hair style – but, there’s more underlying this story. Dr Firth seems to have a project of his own and it’s quite horrifying. I really enjoyed this collection. I would give two provisos. I don’t think this is supposed to be scary so if you go into it with such expectations then you might be setting yourself up for disappointment – it is however horror, maybe not blood soaked and visceral but horror nonetheless. That being said I don’t think Frankenstein is a scary story. I think both are meant to be thought provoking and that brings me to my second suggestion – read these stories with care. If you race through these you will miss the cleverness that is taking place here. Overall, I still don’t like short stories – but, when they’re brought together like this, a set of stories that told together make a whole – well, really, it’s a wonderful creation. I received a copy courtesy of the publishers through Netgalley, for which my thanks. The above is my own opinion.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tanya W

    I was looking forward to this book, but unfortunately I found it overall ok. Each writer seemed to have the same style, & honestly I found every story kind of boring because of it. There was just no excitement or intrigue for me at all. Sorry!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    ‘Creatures’ is an anthology of five short stories all of which have been inspired by the story of Frankenstein. Much like all anthologies there is a mix of fantastic, average and not so good. Because of that mix I have given this collection 3 stars overall but also would add the caveat that this collection is probably only going to really appeal to those who like or are interested in stories about Frankenstein. While some have a ‘creep’ factor, there is nothing particularly scary about any of the ‘Creatures’ is an anthology of five short stories all of which have been inspired by the story of Frankenstein. Much like all anthologies there is a mix of fantastic, average and not so good. Because of that mix I have given this collection 3 stars overall but also would add the caveat that this collection is probably only going to really appeal to those who like or are interested in stories about Frankenstein. While some have a ‘creep’ factor, there is nothing particularly scary about any of the stories and also the nuance of the message that Mary Shelley was trying to convey about playing god is lost with some of them. But then, it’s a bit hard to present such a complex theme via the short story medium and some of the stories have a bash at a very decent message of their own. The stories are arranged in a chronological manner as follows:- ‘Kaseem’s Way,’ set in London in the mid 1800’s about a young man working in a prison who becomes interested in the cadavers for more than the traditional sense of scientific research. ‘The New Woman,’ also set in London in the final days of 1899 where a bohemian artist and her doctor girlfriend decide to embark on creating a new ‘Eve’ to impress their outlandish ‘friends.’ ‘Reculver,’ an old man reminisces about a strange summer in Kent during the Second World War when he was a young boy and a peculiar ‘man’ he met. ‘Made Monstrous,’ a policeman in the 80’s and a helpful young policewoman investigate a recent spate of body part thefts from a graveyard and morgues. ‘Love Thee Better,’ in the here and now a couple go on a cruise ship that specialises in medical procedures allowing people to donate pieces of their body that they don’t want to those who do. Meanwhile the Captain partakes in an unusual hobby of his own. So what did I find fantastic, average and not so good? In terms of ‘not so good’:- I think my least favourite was ‘Reculver.’ In all honesty I didn’t see the connection of it to the other stories but then I found myself skimming this one as it wasn’t the most engaging. There is a very brief moment where the creature is met (but motives are strangely unclear) and aside from that I was unsure of how this fit as it was a more a ‘coming of age’ story and the reminiscing of events that occurred during the war. ‘The New Woman’ was my next least favourite. It started slow, a group of pretentious bohemian artiste friends gathering around for Christmas dinner with discussions of the next steps of avant garde art. It kicks up when two women decide to mix science and art and create a beautiful creature of their own, ready to be displayed as a moving performance piece at their hostess’ next party. After their creation is successful one displays a guilty conscience at the treatment of their sentient new life but begins a slightly disturbing sexual relationship with her. I don’t know. It was supposed to be erotic but I’m not seeing sex with a dead body, however reanimated, as a sexy thing. What was ‘average?’ ‘Love Thee Better’ was enjoyable (if that’s the right word?) because it was genuinely disturbing in showing how, in modern times, science needs moral boundaries and regulatory bodies to monitor what people do with their intellect and technology. The claustrophobia heightens as things go from fun to not so fun and then from bad to worse on a cruise ship no one can seem to escape from. However the introduction of a ‘creature’ didn’t seem necessary as the purpose of the ship was creepy enough and unfortunately I found the narrator rather passive and highly irritating in her denial of events. I know I didn’t include it as a category but this one was good. ‘Kaseem’s Way’ was a look at the abandonment of creator to their creation or father figure to their child. Kaseem is a street urchin found on the streets as a child by a science professor and adopted by him. Kaseem takes a keen interest in cutting up bodies for research and puts this to good use. This is interspersed with the actual creature of Frankenstein’s (in this world a real person) who laments the death of his ‘father’ and his prior cruel abandonment. Their paths cross and the creature himself abandons a creation of his own. What did I think was ‘fantastic’? ‘Made Monstrous,’ is a clever police investigation story with a twist. We have a grizzled older policeman and a plucky younger policewoman who is constantly passed over for promotion on account of being a woman. Our policeman doesn’t believe in that nonsense and they both set out to investigate a case of grave-robbing and body stealing. The story is well paced and well written containing both a dark sense of humour, camaraderie, and a truly sad and painful message; that sometimes humans are the most monstrous. Like I said, it’s a mixed bag (of body parts, haha. I’m so punny) but I would recommend it to you if you crave stories inspired by Frankenstein. If not, then it may not be for you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura Newsholme

    I have read a few of the collections in this series so far and this one does not disappoint. Following the legacy of Frankenstein, the five offerings here provide insights into the people inspired by the doctor's macabre experiments to attempt their own forays into the world of medical regeneration. Each tale takes place in a different time period, ranging from the 1850s in Tade Thompson's fantastic and tragic 'Kaseem's Way' through to the present in Kaaron Warren's wonderful 'Love Thee Better', I have read a few of the collections in this series so far and this one does not disappoint. Following the legacy of Frankenstein, the five offerings here provide insights into the people inspired by the doctor's macabre experiments to attempt their own forays into the world of medical regeneration. Each tale takes place in a different time period, ranging from the 1850s in Tade Thompson's fantastic and tragic 'Kaseem's Way' through to the present in Kaaron Warren's wonderful 'Love Thee Better', which I think was my favourite story in the collection, dealing with a cruise ship for those who hate their bodies and those who want replacements. The tragedy of Shelley's novel is writ large amongst the pages of this collection and the tone is suitably sombre. The 'monster' is often in the background, lurking in the shadows, but his presence can be felt on every page and all in all, I thought this was a wonderful collection paying homage to one of the best horror/science fiction novels ever written. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Banshee

    This novel includes five stories about Frankstein, his research, or his monster. Overall the stories were alright but the majority of them didn't feel like a true Frankstein story. They weren't scary and 3 of the stories didn't add anything new to Frankenstein literature. The only stories that I felt were unique was Reculver and Made Monsterous. Kaseem's Way by Tade Thompson - 3/5 Stars Kaseem, after reading notes on reanimating written by another doctor decides to try it himself. I felt the begi This novel includes five stories about Frankstein, his research, or his monster. Overall the stories were alright but the majority of them didn't feel like a true Frankstein story. They weren't scary and 3 of the stories didn't add anything new to Frankenstein literature. The only stories that I felt were unique was Reculver and Made Monsterous. Kaseem's Way by Tade Thompson - 3/5 Stars Kaseem, after reading notes on reanimating written by another doctor decides to try it himself. I felt the beginning was too gory and sad with all the unnecessary animal deaths. The middle of the story picked up with the surprise visitor. The New Woman by Rose Biggin - 2/5 Stars This story features two woman who want to combine their artistic side with their medical expertise by bringing a dead woman back to life. The story is set around Christmas time which feels strange and unwelcome for a story featuring Frankenstein. This wrecked the story for me, hence the low rating. Reculver by Paul Meloy - 3.5/5 Stars Story isn't what you'd expect when you first think of Frankenstein. It features a boy, a missing teenage girl and a forbidden love. Frankenstein's creature didn't appear much in the story until the end which initially bothered me. Who wants to read about some boy when you could read about a hideous creature. The ending made up for it though, great conclusion. Made Monstrous by Emma Newman - 3/5 Stars Story follows two detectives as they investigate a case of stolen body parts. It didn't really feel like a Frankenstein story, not until the end. Great police procedural and a neat ending. Love Thee Better by Kaaron Warren - 3/5 Stars This story is about a couple who go on a cruise. It isn't an ordinary cruise as the cruise patrons are on it to have limbs/body parts replaced or removed. Story was okay but a lot of the twists I saw coming pages before they actually happened. Main character was bland. Thank you to Netgalley for this ARC.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angie-lee

    Creatures The Legacy of Frankenstein is an anthology collection of five stories inspired by the infamous scientist and monster tale crafted by the genius Mary Shelley. As a fan of Shelleys creation I was excited to read this anthology expecting this collection to be filled with gruesomely inspired takes on the creation of life, death, the moral implications, dark scenes and unique monster ideals. While I'll admit there were some great parts from each story only one really grabbed my interest and Creatures The Legacy of Frankenstein is an anthology collection of five stories inspired by the infamous scientist and monster tale crafted by the genius Mary Shelley. As a fan of Shelleys creation I was excited to read this anthology expecting this collection to be filled with gruesomely inspired takes on the creation of life, death, the moral implications, dark scenes and unique monster ideals. While I'll admit there were some great parts from each story only one really grabbed my interest and really gave a new inspired look that I was hoping to find in this collection that I seek in many similar "Frankenstein" collections though I applaud all the authors on thier ideas and styles included in the collection. I felt so much potential was untapped with this collection many of the stories fell short and we're somewhat lacking that dark undertone or grittyness. The exception was "Made Monstrous" by Emma Newman this inspired unique tale was great I really enjoyed the female written perspective a 1920s tale of two women who reanimate a woman together for a combined art/science project as a detective investigates the disapearance of body parts. This story was really good so dark and gritty and I enjoyed the female focused aspect. I really enjoyed the gruesome factor and give props to the respective authors for incorporating the medical matters and encompassing body part theft and expert discussion on huhuman anatomy a true nod to Shelleys masterpiece. I want to thank Netgalley for providing me an ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

    Can I just say that fall is my favorite season? There's just something about falling temperatures, the crisp smell in the air, and the Halloween decorations that's just my right up my alley. I've always been a fan of suspense, and horror so whenever this time of year rolls around I'm always looking for something nice and creepy to read. Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein really fit the bill. I was provided a copy of this book for the purpose of reviewing it but, as always, this has no bearin Can I just say that fall is my favorite season? There's just something about falling temperatures, the crisp smell in the air, and the Halloween decorations that's just my right up my alley. I've always been a fan of suspense, and horror so whenever this time of year rolls around I'm always looking for something nice and creepy to read. Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein really fit the bill. I was provided a copy of this book for the purpose of reviewing it but, as always, this has no bearing on my opinions. Fans of Shelley's original monster, like me, will be interested to see him reappear in different ways within each of the five short stories included in this collection. My two favorites involved a reanimation cruise and a mystery involving a grave robber. Each story tells a tale about reanimation and being an outsider in an increasingly more modern setting so you get to follow the monster through time. Even though Frankenstein is a tale that is often re-imagined I enjoyed reading a few new takes on the tale. As with any short story collection some of these stories were better than others but I think that most of them are worth a read. While none of them are particularly scary, all of the stories had a gloomy, sombre tone much like the original and they really are great to sit down with on an October night. Creatures will be available on October 16th and if you're looking to get into the Halloween spirit with a quick but interesting read I recommend it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Madhu MaBookYard -

    My Rating : 3.5🌟 overall for all the stories . Will upload the individual stories's soon! This book is a collection of 5 stories which have Frankenstein as one of their ideas! And boy oh boy was it entertaining! The first thing I loved about this book is how each story is unique in its own way and in no way related to the actual classic! It may have the concept of Frankenstein but never in a same way! Each story had its charm and I absolutely loved that fact! Second of all, it's no wonder I loved th My Rating : 3.5🌟 overall for all the stories . Will upload the individual stories's soon! This book is a collection of 5 stories which have Frankenstein as one of their ideas! And boy oh boy was it entertaining! The first thing I loved about this book is how each story is unique in its own way and in no way related to the actual classic! It may have the concept of Frankenstein but never in a same way! Each story had its charm and I absolutely loved that fact! Second of all, it's no wonder I loved this book, I am a fan of horror/thriller and this book was right up my alley! As I said before, each story was different! And if you look even closer, you can classify them into different genre! Especially I loved the last 2 stories! You can call them realistic horror fiction! And they were amazing! Since it's a collection of stories by different authors, you can almost identify the writing style. Though I loved few, I had issues with few. Overall, I loved the concept and how the stories were written. If you a fan of retellings, gothoc fiction, horror or thrillers, definitely give this book a shot! *Thankyou Netgalley for providing an e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liesl

    As so often happens when I read short story anthologies, I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to rate "Creatures". Some of the stories in here are absolutely stunning. I loved Emma Newman's "Made Monstrous", focusing on a detective trying to solve the mystery of a series of body part thefts. The 1920s tale of two women who reanimated a woman together as a project of science and art combined was also fabulous. However, some of the other stories were less to my taste. Perfectly serviceable fiction, bu As so often happens when I read short story anthologies, I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to rate "Creatures". Some of the stories in here are absolutely stunning. I loved Emma Newman's "Made Monstrous", focusing on a detective trying to solve the mystery of a series of body part thefts. The 1920s tale of two women who reanimated a woman together as a project of science and art combined was also fabulous. However, some of the other stories were less to my taste. Perfectly serviceable fiction, but nothing which really caught my imagination. Not to mention my squeamishness over medical matters definitely is a hindrance when trying to read a story about the first treatise on human anatomy. Definitely would recommend to anyone who is a fan of the original novel, it's well worth a read. Thank you Netgalley for giving me an ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    beep boop beep

    This felt a lot more like copying Shelley than being inspired by her... I love Frankenstein and I wanted to love this, too, but I just didn't feel that it did the original justice. Even down to the authors' voices... they all seemed to be mimicking Shelley's. I mean, I haven't read anything else from these authors, so I can't speak to what their styles are like outside of this anthology, but it just felt a little bit canned and disingenuous. She's the mother of science fiction, and I don't think This felt a lot more like copying Shelley than being inspired by her... I love Frankenstein and I wanted to love this, too, but I just didn't feel that it did the original justice. Even down to the authors' voices... they all seemed to be mimicking Shelley's. I mean, I haven't read anything else from these authors, so I can't speak to what their styles are like outside of this anthology, but it just felt a little bit canned and disingenuous. She's the mother of science fiction, and I don't think this lives up to that expectation. If this is her legacy, I'm disappointed. Thanks to Netgalley for the free ARC. I wish I liked it more, but these are my honest thoughts.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gianna

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Creatures is a fascinating anthology in honor of one of the greatest Gothic books in the history of literature, Shelley's Frankenstein. A series of imaginative stories based on Shelley's original concept, creatures is well constructed, with the stories of different authors fitting together very well. There was, sincerely, no boring parts in this anthology. All stories were original, well written a I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Creatures is a fascinating anthology in honor of one of the greatest Gothic books in the history of literature, Shelley's Frankenstein. A series of imaginative stories based on Shelley's original concept, creatures is well constructed, with the stories of different authors fitting together very well. There was, sincerely, no boring parts in this anthology. All stories were original, well written and enjoyable. This is a book I would recommend to all fans of the Gothic literature genre, and it is also a must-have for fans of the original Frankenstein.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Waiting within the pages of this anthology are five new stories taking Mary Shelley's story of Frankenstein and giving it a unique twist. Spanning different time periods from the 1850's with Kaseem's Way, to the present day with Love Thee Better, each tale keeps to the solemn voice of the original. Some stories resonated more with me than others but they all managed to sustain the feeling of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The authors have all taken the mad doctor's ideology of reanimation and molde Waiting within the pages of this anthology are five new stories taking Mary Shelley's story of Frankenstein and giving it a unique twist. Spanning different time periods from the 1850's with Kaseem's Way, to the present day with Love Thee Better, each tale keeps to the solemn voice of the original. Some stories resonated more with me than others but they all managed to sustain the feeling of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The authors have all taken the mad doctor's ideology of reanimation and molded it into their own monstrous creation, terrifying yet piteous. Read more at Cats Luv Coffee

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rana

    Publishers and editors take note: I 150% bought this book on the strength of Tade Thompson's writing. I literally did not even read the synopsis (and barely looked at the title). I heard Thompson's name and I flew off to Amazon to purchase. And luckily, this was super awesome. Such a fascinating way to tell a story, that each short story was in fact a continuation of the original (and of the original Frankenstein, even) story, just moving forward in time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    Ultimately an inconsistent but enjoyable read! Like with most short story compilations there were some stories I enjoyed more than others. A proper review will be coming soon!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Avery Delany

    Creatures is a phenomenal anthology which brings together 5 unique stories which not only reimagine but extend’s the legacy of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Progressing in chronological order from Tade Thompson’s 1850’s London to Kaaron Warren’s modern-day cruise ship, Mary Shelley (and Adam) are felt within each story in new and interesting ways. David Thomas Moore, the editor of the anthology, introduces the collection’s creatures as important ‘ciphers’ which encode messages about human experie Creatures is a phenomenal anthology which brings together 5 unique stories which not only reimagine but extend’s the legacy of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Progressing in chronological order from Tade Thompson’s 1850’s London to Kaaron Warren’s modern-day cruise ship, Mary Shelley (and Adam) are felt within each story in new and interesting ways. David Thomas Moore, the editor of the anthology, introduces the collection’s creatures as important ‘ciphers’ which encode messages about human experiences: Tade Thompson’s Kaseem’s Way confronts and criticizes Britain colonial heritage; Rose Biggin’s haunting The New Woman examines the objectification of art, beauty, and women; British nostalgia, innocence, and spine-chilling infatuation come to clash in Paul Meloy’s Reculver, the wonderful Emma Newman’s Made Monstrous exposes sexism and injustice through monstrosity, and Kaaron Warren’s ominous Love Thee Better captures capitalist alienation and embodied estrangement. All 5 stories in Creatures are intriguing parts which make up a fantastically eerie whole, offering a reading experience which is simultaneously unsettling yet enjoyable. I would definitely recommend Creatures to lovers of science fiction and horror, especially those of you who are revel in body horror, and those who like creepy stories about forbidden science. It was a fantastic read for Halloween and is a sure bet for bringing some of that creepy Halloween essence into the rest of your year. Thank you to Rebellion Publishing for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This has in no way influenced my review. Check out my blog to read the full review of Creatures!

  20. 4 out of 5

    CC

    I love Frankenstein. I love the ripples that such a story has made through modern literature and cinema, so I absolutely had to snatch up this book. I don't often read short story anthologies, so it's difficult to judge the book on the whole when the stories inside of it vary so wildly. There are some true stand out moments and I especially loved Eve, the beautiful creation of two bohemian women. At times though, other stories did drag and in my opinion, were a little too derivative and dependan I love Frankenstein. I love the ripples that such a story has made through modern literature and cinema, so I absolutely had to snatch up this book. I don't often read short story anthologies, so it's difficult to judge the book on the whole when the stories inside of it vary so wildly. There are some true stand out moments and I especially loved Eve, the beautiful creation of two bohemian women. At times though, other stories did drag and in my opinion, were a little too derivative and dependant on the source material rather than finding an original spark and story to tell. So, there are highs and lows but the good parts were very enjoyable.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lipsy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nikki "The Crazie Betty" V.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ana Santo

    An anthology of five stories having everyone’s favourite scientist and monster as inspiration? Of course I had to request this book as soon as I saw it. I had big hopes for this collection but got greatly disappointed. I quite enjoyed “Kaseem’s Way” by Tade Thompson and “Made Monstrous” by Emma Newman but the rest felt just unnecessary raw, sexual, confusing and even pointless. One of the short stories even reminded me more of H. G. Wells' “The Island of Doctor Moreau” than the book that should b An anthology of five stories having everyone’s favourite scientist and monster as inspiration? Of course I had to request this book as soon as I saw it. I had big hopes for this collection but got greatly disappointed. I quite enjoyed “Kaseem’s Way” by Tade Thompson and “Made Monstrous” by Emma Newman but the rest felt just unnecessary raw, sexual, confusing and even pointless. One of the short stories even reminded me more of H. G. Wells' “The Island of Doctor Moreau” than the book that should be the inspiration ... so they maybe got the wrong doctor on that one. Frankenstein it’s a story that make us think about morals, responsibility, life, death, creation, rights... Yet most of these stories did not evocate any of those thoughts in me. I felt that some stories picked and chose things from Mary Shelley’s creation and went with it not having much of a real goal. That they did not go beyond the aesthetics that surrounds the mythical monster and that have gained a life of their own. The idea was a good one, the chronological order of the stories was also a nice feature, but over all I just felt that this project missed to achieved its true potential. Would I recommend it? Yes, but not to everyone. I would only recommend to the readers that do like horror and want to expand their catalogue of books in the genre. (Got my copy thanks to Net Galley)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    It starts with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and his monster. It continues through out this book with others and their makers. No two are just alike. No story exactly the same. All different and the same. I loved that these authors make the story their own. Different perspectives and yet all parts, just like the creature. For all Frankenstein fans. I recommend it highly. I don't want to give too much away but the stories flow from one to the other. I received this book from Net Galley and Rebellio It starts with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and his monster. It continues through out this book with others and their makers. No two are just alike. No story exactly the same. All different and the same. I loved that these authors make the story their own. Different perspectives and yet all parts, just like the creature. For all Frankenstein fans. I recommend it highly. I don't want to give too much away but the stories flow from one to the other. I received this book from Net Galley and Rebellion Publishing for a honest review and no compensation otherwise.The opinions and thoughts are my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna Szabó

    Creatures wasn’t what I was hoping for. I am giving 3 stars because the fourth story by Emma Newman was great. But the others I just found boring, I couldn’t even finish 2 of them. I still want to thank NetGalley and the publisher for this advance copy.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adri Joy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    As a huge fan of Frankenstein, I was very eager to get my hands on this book, and I am happy to say I was not disappointed. Creatures really does live up to it's subtitle, The Legacy of Frankenstein, as it takes the well known and beloved tale as inspiration for five authors , and allows them to bring their own unique voices to bear . While the resulting stories are very different, and span a variety of eras and settings, each is strangely unsettling. Some have very obvious ties to their inspira As a huge fan of Frankenstein, I was very eager to get my hands on this book, and I am happy to say I was not disappointed. Creatures really does live up to it's subtitle, The Legacy of Frankenstein, as it takes the well known and beloved tale as inspiration for five authors , and allows them to bring their own unique voices to bear . While the resulting stories are very different, and span a variety of eras and settings, each is strangely unsettling. Some have very obvious ties to their inspiration , while in others the link is a little more obscure but each is enjoyable and chilling. Tade Thompson begins with Kaseem's Way, set in London, 1849 , where the titular Kaseem has a remarkable interest in anatomy , while The New Woman by Rose Biggin takes the action to 1899 where a couple begin to experiment with science and art to create a new beauty before destructive jealousy wreaks havoc. I have to admit that this evocative and haunting tale was one of the highlights of the book for me. Reculver by Paul Meloy brings us forward in time to the second world war, and again jealousy plays a part. Another favourite was Made Monstrous by Emma Newman, a police story set in the 1980's with some seriously dark undertones and a startling amount of character development for a short story. The final story is in some ways the most disturbing , it takes not just it's characters , but also the reader, on a nightmare journey where time loses all meaning. While the stories are all very different from one another, at their heart they hold true to the spirit of Frankenstein, the dangers of science run riot as well as the egoism and hubris of man. I read and reviewed an ARC courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher, all opinions are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sue Blanchard

    Thankyou to NetGalley, Rebellion, Abaddon, and the authors for the opportunity to read this digital copy of Creatures; The Legacy of Frankenstein in exchange for an honest and unbiased opinion. This book is an anthology of stories. I thought it was a good read. The stories were well written.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more

  31. 4 out of 5

    Genereams

  32. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Sangiorgi

  34. 4 out of 5

    T. Jackson

  35. 4 out of 5

    Tobyann Aparisi

  36. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  37. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Hinck

  38. 4 out of 5

    Verena

  39. 5 out of 5

    Linden

  40. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Derwin

  41. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Johnson

  42. 4 out of 5

    The

  43. 4 out of 5

    Lauren (Shooting Stars Mag) Becker

  44. 4 out of 5

    Christina Pilkington

  45. 5 out of 5

    Magda Kossakowska

  46. 4 out of 5

    Andrada

  47. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav R Panday

  48. 5 out of 5

    Annaliese

  49. 5 out of 5

    Carly Nicholas

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