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The Angel in the Glass

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Physician-sleuth Dr Gabriel Taverner uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in the second of this intriguing historical mystery series. June, 1604. When the emaciated body of a vagrant is found on the edge of the moor, it's the verdict of physician Gabriel Taverner that the man died of natural causes - but is all as it seems? Who was the dead man, and why had h Physician-sleuth Dr Gabriel Taverner uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in the second of this intriguing historical mystery series. June, 1604. When the emaciated body of a vagrant is found on the edge of the moor, it's the verdict of physician Gabriel Taverner that the man died of natural causes - but is all as it seems? Who was the dead man, and why had he come to the small West Country village of Tavy St Luke's to die cold, sick and alone? With no one claiming to have known him, his identity remains a mystery. Then a discovery found buried in a nearby field throws a strange new light on the case ... and in attempting to find the answers, Gabriel Taverner and Coroner Theophilus Davey unearth a series of shocking secrets stretching back more than fourteen years.


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Physician-sleuth Dr Gabriel Taverner uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in the second of this intriguing historical mystery series. June, 1604. When the emaciated body of a vagrant is found on the edge of the moor, it's the verdict of physician Gabriel Taverner that the man died of natural causes - but is all as it seems? Who was the dead man, and why had h Physician-sleuth Dr Gabriel Taverner uncovers dark secrets in his small Devon village in the second of this intriguing historical mystery series. June, 1604. When the emaciated body of a vagrant is found on the edge of the moor, it's the verdict of physician Gabriel Taverner that the man died of natural causes - but is all as it seems? Who was the dead man, and why had he come to the small West Country village of Tavy St Luke's to die cold, sick and alone? With no one claiming to have known him, his identity remains a mystery. Then a discovery found buried in a nearby field throws a strange new light on the case ... and in attempting to find the answers, Gabriel Taverner and Coroner Theophilus Davey unearth a series of shocking secrets stretching back more than fourteen years.

30 review for The Angel in the Glass

  1. 5 out of 5

    Judy Lesley

    Thank you to NetGalley and Severn House Publishing for a digital galley of this novel. Author Alys Clare is one of my favorite historical mystery writers so I was pleased to read the first book in this series, Rustle of Silk, in 2017. Now Dr. Gabriel Taverner is back helping Theophilus Davey, coroner for this area of Devon, when a body is found in a deserted hovel. In trying to identify the body and discover the cause of death Gabriel spends time researching the conditions he found on the body an Thank you to NetGalley and Severn House Publishing for a digital galley of this novel. Author Alys Clare is one of my favorite historical mystery writers so I was pleased to read the first book in this series, Rustle of Silk, in 2017. Now Dr. Gabriel Taverner is back helping Theophilus Davey, coroner for this area of Devon, when a body is found in a deserted hovel. In trying to identify the body and discover the cause of death Gabriel spends time researching the conditions he found on the body and by seeking out those in the neighborhood with specialized knowledge to help him come to some decision. I admit to being a fan of this author's writing. Clare has the talent to make the narration of her novels flow so seamlessly that it is often difficult to tell her research material from her imagination. I very much appreciate that she allows her characters to make mistakes. This story is set in 1604 and the forensic side of criminal investigation is still in its infancy. Even the excellent schooling Gabriel Taverner got did not prepare him for every eventuality he would find in practicing medicine and uncovering clues from murder victims. Gabe's sister Celia is again very much a part of the story as is Judyth Penwarden, a midwife and healer; both women are presented as intelligent people who are able to help Gabriel when his focus is too narrow for the situation. There are many situations from the pasts of people living in this rural area of Devon which all lead up to the dramatic events of the story. This book is more sedate in its movement than thriller or suspense novels of modern times. Allow yourself to devote time to getting to know the characters and imagine how the time period and the rural setting impact the story. If you do those things, I hope you will enjoy this series as much as I do.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This book found me exactly at the "right" time. That's not always the case with fiction books in mystery or historical era drama. I did not want another dark and gloomy despair pit. Which this was not. The beginning introductions' sections didn't ignite any great interest. It seemed such a simple level telling and rather too idealized. Which is how, for me, a general who-dun-it "cozy" often reads. But no- that beginning deceived me. Because these 6 or 7 village characters with their professions This book found me exactly at the "right" time. That's not always the case with fiction books in mystery or historical era drama. I did not want another dark and gloomy despair pit. Which this was not. The beginning introductions' sections didn't ignite any great interest. It seemed such a simple level telling and rather too idealized. Which is how, for me, a general who-dun-it "cozy" often reads. But no- that beginning deceived me. Because these 6 or 7 village characters with their professions inter-meshing? They became flawed human, actual- and also in some cases quirkier too than the usual "stamped out" fiction villager of the King James period England. Or most any English villager who-dun-it of any era, even the recent modern. Maybe it was the description of the angel in the sixth glass pane? Regardless- this one embedded me after Gabriel made his first trip to see Lady Clemence and her daughters. Several times in this novel there was a kind of backwards "diagnosis" for conditions and illnesses with different modern or bacterial names- but the reasoning to causes here were interesting in themselves. It was not especially minutia researched, I did not think. Nor did it lack a couple of quite revisionist sensibilities either. But still, even within the idealizations (as with Judeyth) -it still held full blown descriptions and put you THERE. No easy task for such a rural place and within such after "interesting" times memories of the survivors. So I will definitely return to Gabriel and his sister, Jonathan and the others in this town. Not perfect people, but people with a spirit and a onus for logical and intelligent inquiry and optimistic emotional context. The plotting was a 4 star and the various reveals and connections of the last half better than the first 3rd. I did not guess the correct perp on several of the deadliest deeds. And the ones I did guess correctly were fulled out to a better depth than I had perceived would occur. This author is a bit too "cozy" in stereotype for me, but she has clear and often beautiful thought patterns in emotive construction. As when they were looking at the Angel glass pane- both times. That was 5 star. It's hard to convey how "mood" changes under glare of an invasive "art". I will definitely return to Alys Clare for further Gabriel Taverner escapades. In fact, I will probably backtrack to Gabriel Taverner #1.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Severn House for an advance copy of The Angel in the Glass, the second historical murder mystery to feature Devon based Dr Gabriel Tavener and Coroner Theophilus Davey. In the summer of 1604 Theo calls Gabe out to an unexplained death. A vagrant has apparently died of malnutrition and some strange deformity causing disease so Gabe has no doubt in calling it natural causes, but Theo isn't so sure and soon circumstances, including the strange behaviour of local p I would like to thank Netgalley and Severn House for an advance copy of The Angel in the Glass, the second historical murder mystery to feature Devon based Dr Gabriel Tavener and Coroner Theophilus Davey. In the summer of 1604 Theo calls Gabe out to an unexplained death. A vagrant has apparently died of malnutrition and some strange deformity causing disease so Gabe has no doubt in calling it natural causes, but Theo isn't so sure and soon circumstances, including the strange behaviour of local priest, Jonathan Carew, confirm his view. I thoroughly enjoyed The Angel in the Glass which is an intelligent, well crafted novel, full of historical detail and surprisingly adult themes. It is a slow burner which takes its time building inexorably to a conclusion. The slow pace is a pleasure with so many small details providing the reader with much food for thought and sustaining interest in where it's going. I found it both absorbing and compelling. The novel is full of historical fact, especially about the religious persecution, tumult and uncertainty of the preceding century. None of it is new to me, having had it imprinted in my mind ad nauseum in my schooldays, but I think it will be very interesting to most readers as it describes a situation which has no relevance in modern times and yet the religious fervour and atrocities committed in its name reverberate in a different context. I found the 17th century medical detail more interesting as it is new to me. The detail is not overwhelming enough to become boring but the thinking of the time is fascinating. The novel is narrated in the first person by Gabe Tavener so it has an immediacy and intimacy that a straightforward third person narrative can't convey. It is interesting to see how events impact him and what he thinks about them, but it's not always easy to discern as he can be quite diffident emotionally. The Angel in the Glass is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.

  4. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Betrayals and tragedies! A vagrant's body is found in an isolated hut near the small village of Tavy St Luke. Physician Gabriel Taverner and coroner Theophilus Davey rule death from natural causes. Gabriel is puzzled by various lumps on the vagrant's body but it seems leprosy is not the cause. Still, Gabriel is troubled. The more he investigates, the more troubled he becomes. The story weaves together a group of dispirit occasions and people to make a whole. The local doctor, Gabriel and his sist Betrayals and tragedies! A vagrant's body is found in an isolated hut near the small village of Tavy St Luke. Physician Gabriel Taverner and coroner Theophilus Davey rule death from natural causes. Gabriel is puzzled by various lumps on the vagrant's body but it seems leprosy is not the cause. Still, Gabriel is troubled. The more he investigates, the more troubled he becomes. The story weaves together a group of dispirit occasions and people to make a whole. The local doctor, Gabriel and his sister, the midwife, the minister, the Coroner, a dead man with part of an astounding drawing of what seems to be an angel, a household where all is not as it seems, and what was reported as a wolf being seen in the region. Meanwhile local boys think they have found a cache of jewels. It's 1604 early in the reign of King James 1 of England. Attitudes to religious illuminations have lessened but the attitudes of the reformational are still feared. This story wraps around several themes including the religious feelings of the times, women's health, betrayals, secrets--dreadful secrets of a prominent family that will come to light. This is an independent novel but there are secrets lurking in Gabriel's sister's past that I feel newcomers would want to find out about. An intriguing read with a fascinating collection of main characters. A NetGalley ARC

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    3.5 stars for this historical mystery set in Devon in the summer of 1604. Alys Clare's new series is shaping up nicely with this second entry. I really like the continuing characters--country doctor Gabe Taverner, his clever (widowed) younger sister Celia, the local coroner Theophilus Davey and vicar Jonathan Carew. The author deftly weaves a number of plot threads into a satisfying whole. One thread involves a vagrant, found dead in an out of the way ruined cottage. A second thread ties the vagra 3.5 stars for this historical mystery set in Devon in the summer of 1604. Alys Clare's new series is shaping up nicely with this second entry. I really like the continuing characters--country doctor Gabe Taverner, his clever (widowed) younger sister Celia, the local coroner Theophilus Davey and vicar Jonathan Carew. The author deftly weaves a number of plot threads into a satisfying whole. One thread involves a vagrant, found dead in an out of the way ruined cottage. A second thread ties the vagrant to a local manor house and its very disquieting occupants. A third thread involves a belligerent local farmer who is rumored to have buried treasure on his land. A fourth thread involves the vicar, who is obviously suffering from some severe psychological stress. A final thread takes us back a generation to the religious turmoil generated by Henry VIII's break with the Roman Church. By the time all is resolved the body count is distressingly high, with the reader feeling like they've been put through the wringer, along with Gabe, Theo and Jonathan. I had a good time with this one and I'm looking forward to the next one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    This mystery set in the early 1600s in the West Country highlights the changes coming about in England. The glass referred to, is stained glass windows, which were ordered to be removed and destroyed by the monarch previously. Queen Elizabeth lightened up on persecution, and her successor James 1 has eased matters further. Maybe stained glass can be replaced in the village church. Before coming to that debate, the protagonist, a ship's surgeon who retired injured, is the village doctor who is ca This mystery set in the early 1600s in the West Country highlights the changes coming about in England. The glass referred to, is stained glass windows, which were ordered to be removed and destroyed by the monarch previously. Queen Elizabeth lightened up on persecution, and her successor James 1 has eased matters further. Maybe stained glass can be replaced in the village church. Before coming to that debate, the protagonist, a ship's surgeon who retired injured, is the village doctor who is called upon by the coroner to help establish a cause of death. A vagrant died locally, probably from malnourishment. But he had some disease, and given plague was still rife in London, I am amazed people were not more concerned. The body is left unburied in a crypt for a week, which seems repulsive, but it was colder in the 1600s. The doctor gives first person POV so it is jarring when we also get third person from other characters. I enjoyed meeting his widowed sister, who leads a fairly independent life, and I hope more use will be made of her in later books. A local herb-woman is also present and I am surprised she was not an apothecary, which would be a lot more respectable. The book also touches on the way that homosexuality was outlawed at that time. I'll look forward to more outings from the good Doctor. I downloaded an e-ARC from Fresh Fiction and Net Galley. This is an unbiased review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)

    Set in 1604 at a small West Country village of Tavy St. Luke, Dr. Gabriel Taverner and Coroner Theophilus Davey are called to examine the body of an unidentified vagrant found up on the edge of the moor. Although they initially concluded that he died of natural causes, but further investigations suggested otherwise when local gossips lead them to the home of Sir Thomas Fairlight, a prominent family in the village. Soon after, Gabe and Theo unearthed a series of shocking secrets that not only inv Set in 1604 at a small West Country village of Tavy St. Luke, Dr. Gabriel Taverner and Coroner Theophilus Davey are called to examine the body of an unidentified vagrant found up on the edge of the moor. Although they initially concluded that he died of natural causes, but further investigations suggested otherwise when local gossips lead them to the home of Sir Thomas Fairlight, a prominent family in the village. Soon after, Gabe and Theo unearthed a series of shocking secrets that not only involved the family but the village as well. This historical forensic mystery is the second book in the Gabriel Taverner Mystery series. Truth be told, the only reason I read this book is because of the forensic element which is unfortunately, only briefly mentioned in the story. The characters are flat, plain and lack of depth. I felt that I'd need to read the first book as not much background stories about the characters are given in this book. That being said, this book is still a pretty good read. It is a very plot driven story with many subplots which may seem overwhelming in the beginning. But the suspenseful writing will keep readers engaged until the last page. I would still recommend this book to any historical murder mystery readers. ***I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from Severn House Publishers through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All views expressed in this review are my own and was not influenced by the author, publisher or any third party.***

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lola Et La Vie

    Having not read the first in this series, I was worried I would miss a chunk of information. To be honest, I did feel I lacked a little bit of background information, but this was perfectly enjoyable as a standalone. Set in a small Devon village, I liked the characters and the setting in that particular time period. I do love a good historical mystery and this was true to that genre, with physicians, lords, servants, priests and the like. Like in a previous book I read by this author the POV switc Having not read the first in this series, I was worried I would miss a chunk of information. To be honest, I did feel I lacked a little bit of background information, but this was perfectly enjoyable as a standalone. Set in a small Devon village, I liked the characters and the setting in that particular time period. I do love a good historical mystery and this was true to that genre, with physicians, lords, servants, priests and the like. Like in a previous book I read by this author the POV switches from first person when it is told from Gabriel’s perspective, to third person when we are reading from other peoples’ perspectives. This jarred a little bit in the beginning, but I did get used to it. Although I did like the writing and the main characters, I was not the biggest fan of this particular mystery and its resolution. It felt a little bit cliche and predictable. It was a bit on the homophobic side as well, though this probably was intentional and true to the time period it was set in. I did enjoy this well enough and I would happily read more from this author. I might look up the first in this series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gayle

    A mysterious man is found dead. No one seems to know him, although a few had seen him in recent days. Dr. Taverner determines that he has dies from natural causes. When hired hands from a nearby home report seeing the mystery man, Dr. Taverner and his friend, Coroner Theophilus Davey go to investigate, but the family denies ever seeing the dead man. When some children find some "jewels" in a field, another mystery seems to appear. The local vicar asks Dr. Taverner for his assistance in the matte A mysterious man is found dead. No one seems to know him, although a few had seen him in recent days. Dr. Taverner determines that he has dies from natural causes. When hired hands from a nearby home report seeing the mystery man, Dr. Taverner and his friend, Coroner Theophilus Davey go to investigate, but the family denies ever seeing the dead man. When some children find some "jewels" in a field, another mystery seems to appear. The local vicar asks Dr. Taverner for his assistance in the matter. The doctor agrees and, together, they uncover some beautiful artifacts. But the doctor still has the mystery of the unknown dead man. Can he determine who this man was? This is a new series by an excellent author. I've read many books by Alys Clare and have enjoyed every one. This series is just out of my normal reading range, but knowing how much I've enjoyed books by the author previously, I decided to give it a shot. I was not disappointed. This waan ts a very good book and I plan to read more of the books in this series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I liked so much about this book, but I went back and forth on whether to give this 3 stars or 4. I enjoy the characters, and I like the plot, but in three sections we're basically given pages and pages of info dump. It's important information, but surely it could have been cut down and shared in other ways? It definitely impacted my enjoyment of this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    This is the first book i read in this series and I will surely read the others as this one was very good. It was fascinating and I couldn't put it down as the plot was great as well as the characters and the well researched historical background. I look forward to reading the next instalment. Recommended! Many thanks to Severn House and Netgalley for this ARC

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Interesting historical mystery set in 1604 Devon. I'd never thought about physicians and coroners working together to solve murder mysteries during this time period but Clare has introduced me to Gabriel and Theophilus. This was a difficult time in the UK, filled with religious discrimination and strife and this is neatly wrapped into the story. The characters in this- including Gabe's sister Celia- are what make this a very good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Summer of 1604 and the body of a vagrant is discovered which physician Gabriel Taverner deems to be from natural causes. But who is he and why is he in the Devon village. But why do the residents of the Fairlights insist they have not seen him when their servants say otherwise. A slow paced mystery as it introduces the characters. An enjoyable well-written story with a fine selection of varying characters. Although the second in the series it can easily be read as a standalone. A NetGalley Book

  14. 4 out of 5

    Niles Perkins

    wonderful complex mystery set in the 1500's. Delightful.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth Davidson

    When I was approved to read Alys Clare‘s new book in the Gabriel Taverner mystery series, The Angel in the Glass, I wasn’t sure what to expect given that I haven’t read the first book. About The Angel in the Glass June 1604 Dr Gabriel Taverner is called upon by coroner and friend, Theophilus Davey, when a body is found in an uninhabited house on the moor. The body appears to be that of a vagrant. As Gabriel helps investigate the death, he becomes involved with helping the parish priest baitee his per When I was approved to read Alys Clare‘s new book in the Gabriel Taverner mystery series, The Angel in the Glass, I wasn’t sure what to expect given that I haven’t read the first book. About The Angel in the Glass June 1604 Dr Gabriel Taverner is called upon by coroner and friend, Theophilus Davey, when a body is found in an uninhabited house on the moor. The body appears to be that of a vagrant. As Gabriel helps investigate the death, he becomes involved with helping the parish priest baitee his personal demons. Gabe learns that the demons are linked with the dead body and there is a terrible trail of secrets to be uncovered. Who was the vagrant and why did he die? What is haunting the painsh priest? My Review I loved this historical crime fiction. I didn’t read it too quickly but actually enjoyed taking it all in. Dr Gabriel Taverner is a good character, and I didn’t need to read the first book to feel like I know him. The book works very well as a standalone. Alys managed to build the suspense expertly throughout the book. It wasn’t a fast-paced read like most of the other books I have read recently but I did really enjoy ambling my way through the mystery. and suspense that was building. All in all The Angel in the Glass was a fantastic read although not necessarily for the faint hearted.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Thank you to NetGalley and Severn House for this ARC from a favorite author of mine. I have read all of Alys Clare's Hawkenlye and Aelf Fen series with pleasure. This series is a bit different for me, and I seem slow to warm to the period, although the characters have improved since Book #1. Former ship's physician Gabriel Tavernoer, and Celia his sister as well as their compatriots in rural Devon, live in a time still reeling from Reformation atrocities. This story exemplifies some of the horror Thank you to NetGalley and Severn House for this ARC from a favorite author of mine. I have read all of Alys Clare's Hawkenlye and Aelf Fen series with pleasure. This series is a bit different for me, and I seem slow to warm to the period, although the characters have improved since Book #1. Former ship's physician Gabriel Tavernoer, and Celia his sister as well as their compatriots in rural Devon, live in a time still reeling from Reformation atrocities. This story exemplifies some of the horrors of that period, although it must be said that the characters themselves are educated and mature. Vestiges of religious intolerance as well as damaged lives are what this story is about.Gabe and his friend Coroner Theo Davy, attempt to solve a death which becomes one, and then a series of murders. The area "gentry" definitely are not who they seem to be as our characters find out. There is a hopeful-of-better-times ending which I appreciated. I gave it 3.5 stars rounded to 4 as it was darker than I care for.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Pawson

    This mystery is set in Devon in the start of the 1600’s. It was a time of religious change and persecution for the church whose beautiful stained glass windows have to be hidden. A body is found on the moor with no obvious cause of death. This starts an investigation by local doctor Gabriel Taverner and coroner Theo Davey. There investigation will take them to the grand house of Sir Thomas Fairlight. A man of substance and power who died over 10 years ago. The house Wrenbeare is run by his widow This mystery is set in Devon in the start of the 1600’s. It was a time of religious change and persecution for the church whose beautiful stained glass windows have to be hidden. A body is found on the moor with no obvious cause of death. This starts an investigation by local doctor Gabriel Taverner and coroner Theo Davey. There investigation will take them to the grand house of Sir Thomas Fairlight. A man of substance and power who died over 10 years ago. The house Wrenbeare is run by his widow Lady Clemence and two surviving daughters. The elder Agnes is married and resides with her husband at Wrenbeare. The younger daughter Denyse is regarded as not right in the head by locals. Why do they need to lie about a break in to the house? This is a nicely paced book with plenty of detail to get you immersed in these dark and dangerous times. I was given an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie

    Thank you to Netgalley for an advance copy of this book. There are echoes of the authors earlier series 'Hawkenlye Mysteries'. Like Josse d'Acquinn Dr Tavener is an outsider with experiences and knowledge that sets him apart from the other characters. This is the second in the series. This is the first one I have read so it is possible to read this as a stand alone but I felt that there were gaps and some background on the trauma suffered by Celia might have been helpful. The story unfolds slowl Thank you to Netgalley for an advance copy of this book. There are echoes of the authors earlier series 'Hawkenlye Mysteries'. Like Josse d'Acquinn Dr Tavener is an outsider with experiences and knowledge that sets him apart from the other characters. This is the second in the series. This is the first one I have read so it is possible to read this as a stand alone but I felt that there were gaps and some background on the trauma suffered by Celia might have been helpful. The story unfolds slowly and slowly pulls you in. Alys Clare has created a landscape for Dr Gaberiel Tavener and his sister Celia that is inhabited by colourful characters who add to the depth of the story and move the plot along. It' a rich tale with many unexplored avenues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rosann

    It was a pleasure returning to the world of Gabriel Taverner. The character of a medieval doctor and former mariner is one that gives the reader a different POV in this well travelled genre— the Middle Ages murder mystery. The author surrounds and fleshes out her story with authentic details and interesting characters without overwhelming with the overt evidence of research. A very enjoyable read, looking forward to Gabe’s next tale.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Moriah

    I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review. I enjoyed the first title in this series immensely, and was not disappointed with this one. This book can be read as a standalone, but why deny yourself the enjoyment of the first book? Angel in the Glass picks up not too long after events of the first title. Gabriel Taverner is a former navy surgeon who was forced to retire after a head injury caused him to develop severe sea sickness. He's finally getting settled into life I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review. I enjoyed the first title in this series immensely, and was not disappointed with this one. This book can be read as a standalone, but why deny yourself the enjoyment of the first book? Angel in the Glass picks up not too long after events of the first title. Gabriel Taverner is a former navy surgeon who was forced to retire after a head injury caused him to develop severe sea sickness. He's finally getting settled into life on land and lives with his recently widowed sister. One June evening, Gabriel finds himself awakened by pebbles thrown at his window by Theophilus Davey, the local coroner who needs Gabriel to consult on the death of a vagrant at the edge of the meadow. In an abandoned, hut, he examines a body in a severe state of decomposition to determine if the death was natural or foul play. After an examination, he determines that the body belongs to a severely malnourished man who was quite beautiful at one time. Although the death isn't suspicious, there is a mystery around the vagrant is. Local gossip claims that a stranger was seen several times at the home (Wrenbeare) of a prominent family who is the subject of local gossip. The former head of the family died a decade or so previously, and his widow, two daughters and a son-in-law currently inhabit the house. The youngest daughter is believed to be mad and suffers from fits. The family insists that gossip is mistaken and no strangers were in the vicinity. Clearly something about the family isn't right, but what are they hiding, and is it connected to the vagrant? In addition to the mystery of the vagrant's identity, Gabriel and his sister are concerned about the local vicar, Jonathan, after noticing that something is haunting him. Gabriel has to tread carefully so he doesn't offend the very private vicar. Is it connected somehow to the rumored jewels that two local boys claim they discovered while trespassing on a local farmer's land? The mysteries are well done and enough clues are provided to allow the reader to develop their own theory of what happened; I really appreciate that the ultimate answer doesn't come out of left field with no way to have figured it out. One of the best parts about this series is that the author does a wonderful job of providing readers a feel for what life was like in the early 1600s. She doesn't shy away from the darker parts of history and societal beliefs/mores. I am a huge fan of this series and hope that additional titles keep coming.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Candy Briggs

    Dr. Gabriel Taverner is a physician, he had been a ship's doctor but had an injury to his head and developed seasickness as a result. He set his practice up in Tavy St. Luke. Celia was his sister, widowed, intelligent and beautiful. Jonathan Carew was the vicar of the village and a friend to the doctor. Theophilus Davey was the coroner and a friend of Gabriel's, they also worked together on some cases. There is a lot of stuff going on in this book, it has twists and turns and also some surprises. Dr. Gabriel Taverner is a physician, he had been a ship's doctor but had an injury to his head and developed seasickness as a result. He set his practice up in Tavy St. Luke. Celia was his sister, widowed, intelligent and beautiful. Jonathan Carew was the vicar of the village and a friend to the doctor. Theophilus Davey was the coroner and a friend of Gabriel's, they also worked together on some cases. There is a lot of stuff going on in this book, it has twists and turns and also some surprises. Two lads from the village went out on a dell and thought they had found some gems and bought back samples to show their friends. Something was bothering the vicar but he wouldn't speak of it. The characters are so interesting and lifelike. The story is well written and keeps your interest from beginning to end. This is the first book I have read of this authors and must say I hope to read more. I received this ARC from Net Galley and voluntarily reviewed it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Alys Clare's The Angel in the Glass continues the adventures of Dr. Gabriel Taverner in his small Devon village. Characters from the first novel (Taverner's sister Celia, Theophilus Davey, local coroner, and Jonathan Carew, local vicar) begin to take on more personality in this dark mystery. Members of the Fairlight family are all creepy and twisted. Fairlight would certainly not have been a Dickensian name choice. He would have chosen a name more in keeping with the character's personality: Mal Alys Clare's The Angel in the Glass continues the adventures of Dr. Gabriel Taverner in his small Devon village. Characters from the first novel (Taverner's sister Celia, Theophilus Davey, local coroner, and Jonathan Carew, local vicar) begin to take on more personality in this dark mystery. Members of the Fairlight family are all creepy and twisted. Fairlight would certainly not have been a Dickensian name choice. He would have chosen a name more in keeping with the character's personality: Malafide, Pedark, Blackmere, Blackquill. read in july NetGalley/Severen House Historical Mystery. Oct. 1, 2018. Print length: 240 pages.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Dunn

    Not bad, good characters, interesting plot. But still is basically a mystery in a small English Village, just set in the past. Nothing special.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Doug Murphy

    A pleasantly paced, atmospheric adventure in 17th century rural England

  25. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Brown

  26. 4 out of 5

    Antoinette

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rtamura

  28. 5 out of 5

    Georgia Lengyel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ron

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Majer

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