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Out of the Maze: An A-Mazing Way to Get Unstuck

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The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of our accomplishments are due to our beliefs: whether we're confident or insecure, cynical or positive, open-minded or inflexible. But it's difficult to change your beliefs--and with them, your outcomes. Find out how Hem, Haw, and the other characters from Who Moved My Cheese? deal with this challenge.


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The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of our accomplishments are due to our beliefs: whether we're confident or insecure, cynical or positive, open-minded or inflexible. But it's difficult to change your beliefs--and with them, your outcomes. Find out how Hem, Haw, and the other characters from Who Moved My Cheese? deal with this challenge.

30 review for Out of the Maze: An A-Mazing Way to Get Unstuck

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    A sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?. A nice homily about opening your mind to new ideas. It will be a useful tool for making teams think about working better together and bringing everyone on board, even the Luddites. With thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK / Ebury Publishing for a free review copy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lizy

    Out of the Maze is the post-humous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese. It's short and doesn't mince words while addressing questions left over from the first book, namely, "how can I adapt?" Most of the book covers Haw, the Littleperson who's looking for cheese in the maze and is struggling to find it. Haw has to address where he's at, and after finding Hope, he's able to move on toward success. I think it's a great guide for those who feel trapped where they're at.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    A business fable and a follow-up to a famous "Who moved my cheese?". Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for sharing the ARC. I see what the author is trying to do here and why fable is chosen to deliver the message... But personally, while I agree with the premises and conclusions - I did not enjoy the delivery style. It felt a little too patronising for my liking - hence my rating. Having said that, if you enjoyed "Who moved my cheese?" - chances are you will enjoy the sequel as well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate Ellis

    I first read the prequel to this book Who Moved My Cheese over 15 years ago and found it very helpful. Fortunately I listened to my audio version of Who Moved My Cheese just a few weeks ago. Out of the Maze written by the late Spencer Johnson follows on and is a very quick read. My honest opinion is that I think it would be most helpful as an addition to an edition of Who Moved My Cheese rather than a separate book whilst understanding the reasons behind it being separate. I think the value of Out I first read the prequel to this book Who Moved My Cheese over 15 years ago and found it very helpful. Fortunately I listened to my audio version of Who Moved My Cheese just a few weeks ago. Out of the Maze written by the late Spencer Johnson follows on and is a very quick read. My honest opinion is that I think it would be most helpful as an addition to an edition of Who Moved My Cheese rather than a separate book whilst understanding the reasons behind it being separate. I think the value of Out of the Maze is gained best after reading Who Moved My Cheese and not as a standalone. The reference to Spencer Johnson's life and the way he dealt with his latter months of life serves a very strong testimony and sums up the message of Out of the Maze.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Olga Miret

    Thanks to NetGalley and to Ebury Digital for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. Although Who Moved My Cheese? was published a long time ago (in 1998) and I had seen it around, I only learned more about it when I was working on the translation of a self-help book. The author referred to Johnson’s fable in his text and I had to check it out. When I saw this sequel announced on NetGalley I felt curious. Most of you will be familiar with the first book, but in short, Thanks to NetGalley and to Ebury Digital for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. Although Who Moved My Cheese? was published a long time ago (in 1998) and I had seen it around, I only learned more about it when I was working on the translation of a self-help book. The author referred to Johnson’s fable in his text and I had to check it out. When I saw this sequel announced on NetGalley I felt curious. Most of you will be familiar with the first book, but in short, it is the fable of two mice and two little people who live in a maze and feed on cheese that magically appears every day. Suddenly, after things have been like this for a long time, the cheese disappears. The two mice go as well, seemingly looking for more cheese, but the two little people don’t agree on what to do. One of them decides to try to find more cheese, while the other stays put, convinced that things will go back to the way they were soon enough. As is the case with all good fables, lessons are learned. In this book, the central fable is framed by a discussion group. The class has been talking about the original book, and one of the students asks what happen to the character left behind. The teacher then comes back with a story, which is the follow-up to the previous one, but this time the protagonist is Hem, the character left behind. Throughout the book he meets hope, has to confront his set of beliefs, and learns invaluable lessons. Like the previous one, this book is really short, under 100 pages, and that includes a note from one of the author’s collaborators and some background to this work. The author died from pancreatic cancer in 2017, and the story of how he handled his disease (including a letter he wrote to his cancer) is also an important part of the book. The book, like its predecessor, does not provide brand-new ideas or earth-shattering insights. Having said that, the lessons become easier to remember because they are provided in the format of a fable. Having the distance and the perspective afforded by reading about imaginary characters in an imaginary situation allows people to think about their own lives and find similarities in outlook that might not be welcome if pointed out directly or if our behaviour is confronted head-on. Realising something for oneself is much more effective and causes less resistance than having somebody tell us where we went wrong. The discussion group and its members also provide some examples of real-life situations and how to deal with them. In sum, this is a short book, written in simple language, easy to read, and it can be useful to people who feel stuck in a rut and cannot see a way forward. It would also provide useful and easy read to course facilitators looking into topics such as belief-systems and how to change one’s perspective.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Great book! I liked this even better than Who Moved My Cheese and I feel like this book really completes the original and compliments it quite well. I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so much wisdom through two, easy to read parables. I read this book in a little over an hour and the effort was well worth the rewards. Special thanks to Sergio Sarinana for introducing me to Who Moved My Cheese a Great book! I liked this even better than Who Moved My Cheese and I feel like this book really completes the original and compliments it quite well. I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so much wisdom through two, easy to read parables. I read this book in a little over an hour and the effort was well worth the rewards. Special thanks to Sergio Sarinana for introducing me to Who Moved My Cheese and Out of the Maze!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… Having never read the first book, I did at first wonder if this was only going to appeal to returning audiences. But I don't think it matters in the end – but I still don't think this is a classic. The framing device hammers morals down (and drops into religion, at the worst moment), and the actual 'story' itself is not hugely brilliant. It's a self-help book designed to show how you can change your ideas, break out of comfort zones (either of being or thinking) and discover new possibilit Hmmm… Having never read the first book, I did at first wonder if this was only going to appeal to returning audiences. But I don't think it matters in the end – but I still don't think this is a classic. The framing device hammers morals down (and drops into religion, at the worst moment), and the actual 'story' itself is not hugely brilliant. It's a self-help book designed to show how you can change your ideas, break out of comfort zones (either of being or thinking) and discover new possibilities, which are what you need when change has happened and the Plan A of stopping dead in your tracks really does seem to favour the 'dead' part of things. Oh, and how having hope (or, indeed, Hope), is a help. It's not completely facile, even if it does occur in a weird fantasy maze realm, but it's not brilliant. At times the whole book is either being too wishy-washy or too tub-thumping, but then again, seldom do these books hit the right balance. Or so I believe...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Helpful and insightful addition to the classic, "Who Moved My Cheese." This book examines beliefs, how beliefs keep us from moving forward to find new cheese, and how to overcome and adapt to new beliefs to help create new experiences.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Megan Thomas

    You’ve got to read this for what it is - a parable-sequel, self-help style, simple story about people living in a maze of cheese. It sounds simple truths, but ones that need reiterating often in society and specifically the business world. It’s a sequel, but doesn’t need to be read in conjunction with the first book, Who Moved My Cheese.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Scott

    The sequel to “Who Moved my Cheese” picks up right where Hem and Haw left off, and is another terrific book to pick up and read when he you feel like you’re in a rut or are looking for good life/leadership lessons. Through a wonderful, poignant anecdote the author discusses the importance of being adaptable, open-minded, and being imaginative. A new character, “Hope” becomes part of the narrative, and as the title suggests, helps our struggling character, Hem believe there could very well be mor The sequel to “Who Moved my Cheese” picks up right where Hem and Haw left off, and is another terrific book to pick up and read when he you feel like you’re in a rut or are looking for good life/leadership lessons. Through a wonderful, poignant anecdote the author discusses the importance of being adaptable, open-minded, and being imaginative. A new character, “Hope” becomes part of the narrative, and as the title suggests, helps our struggling character, Hem believe there could very well be more than just the maze itself. I’d suggest reading Who Moved my Cheese before diving into this, but it is a succinct and natural continuation from that, and if you enjoyed the initial book, you’ll like this one and its new lessons as well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ned

    Out of the Maze is the sequel of the Who Moved My Cheese. The books picks where the previous one left and tells the story of how you can get out of the maze. Through the story the author reveals that our beliefs are the things that hold us back. As the saying goes if a belief is not helping you should change it so thus the story illustrates when Hem changed his beliefs by dropping the one that put him down and adopting the ones that lift him up, he was able to get out of the maze. The maze is fi Out of the Maze is the sequel of the Who Moved My Cheese. The books picks where the previous one left and tells the story of how you can get out of the maze. Through the story the author reveals that our beliefs are the things that hold us back. As the saying goes if a belief is not helping you should change it so thus the story illustrates when Hem changed his beliefs by dropping the one that put him down and adopting the ones that lift him up, he was able to get out of the maze. The maze is figurative for everything that we are stuck in and seems like there is no way out. If we figure out what lifts up and pursuit we can get out of the maze.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Victorien Sukarieh

    Beliefs are powerful, but we should examine them and test them from time to time to make sure they are not holding us back. As a sequel to who moved my cheese, I knew the book had so much to give in so few pages. I was right. I had a lot of moments where I just stopped reading and thought about the words I just absorbed. it was an amazing read, fast one for sure. /along with its prequel this book should be read over and over again and shared as much as possible. this book is highly recommended, an Beliefs are powerful, but we should examine them and test them from time to time to make sure they are not holding us back. As a sequel to who moved my cheese, I knew the book had so much to give in so few pages. I was right. I had a lot of moments where I just stopped reading and thought about the words I just absorbed. it was an amazing read, fast one for sure. /along with its prequel this book should be read over and over again and shared as much as possible. this book is highly recommended, and it won't take more than an hour to finish it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Travis

    Read this book on BF'18 while watching sales climb on our site. As I think about why I can't open my bookstore, I am asking myself "does this belief lift you up, or hold you down"? Hem posed that question to himself as he discovered that beliefs can hold you prisoner. I leave us all with this thought from this awesome quick read "Out of the Maze" by Spencer Johnson, M.D...." Consider the unlikely - explore the impossible."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Diane Mcclure

    These short parables are powerful and this one hits the mark. I have come to recognize we must challenge our beliefs. Those we hold on to and to challenge those of others (in a respectful way). This is what we need to do as part of The Fifth Agreement. This is what we need to do as part of Actionable Science. This is what scientists and health professionals needs to learn how to do in order to deliver science to people who need it to build resilient communities and a future for humankind.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    "Changing what you think doesn't change who you are." "The maze that I'm stuck in isn't my job, or my company, or even my industry. It's my own approach. The Maze I need to get out of? I think it's my own thinking." "There is something amazing outside the Maze!" "When you allow yourself to believe it, an entire world of new possibilities opens its doors to you."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    I really loved Who Moved My Cheese so was excited to hear of this follow on book, however this one felt a little more like it was force feeding the message, rather than letting the reader come to their own conclusions. I still enjoyed it and got something out of it, just not as much as with the first book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeavonna Chapman

    Engaging story building on the first book, “Who Moved My Cheese?” Gave me the warm fuzzies of a good short story with a happy ending. This book is deeper than it is long. I’ll be spending time contemplating the Ways Out of the Maze. I highly recommend this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma L

    I loved the first book and apply this to life at work and at home. I did quite enjoy this second book and the ideas were interesting. Not as impactful as the first book however it is a easy and quick read. Thank you to NetGalley and publisher for the opportunity to review the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melia Chandler

    If you are feeling stuck and can’t find a way out of your own personal maze, then this is a book for you. I did not read the first book but this book helped me put some fears of change into proper prospective. Bravo and thank you Dr. Johnson and Dr. Blanchard!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tami Winbush

    Great new thought process. Make sure to read Who Moved my Cheese first. The two books go hand-in-hand and will complement each other. Never be left behind and caught in your own devised "maze". Keep on thinking and have hope.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Francesc

    This book states the obvious, self-evident, common sense way of going about conflict resolution. Sorry guys, but this is Philosophy 101 (Plato’s Cave and some Descartes as well). Not impressed at all, as I was not impressed with “Who Moved My Cheese?” either.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Short,easy to read and gives you a quick reminder that to move forward we need to go with change. Good for people who feel in a rut and want to find the way to change their perspective. Reads easily and presents the message in the form of a fable.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This book continues where “Moved” left off with Haw finally realizing he has the power within himself. He just needed a little “Hope” to help him along and to get out of his comfort zone. Great message through memorable characters.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Are you stuck? This book will help you get out of the maze of stuckness.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jinn M

    To me, it’s more complicated than the first one yet more reflexive. Like it than I thought I would!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A GREAT quick read! I remember the 1st book and was delighted to read this unexpected sequel. Inspiration for the upcoming new year.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    A quick 20 minute read to boost your spirits. Whether you're "stuck" or simply need to think outside of your usual, it's well worth the time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maegan

    WONDERFUL! Simple and easy to read! Read it in an hour! Perfect simple concepts to totally change your life!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    A good update to the original. It offers a positive way to challenge your ingrained thought schemas.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mourisham Jose

    Just. Dot. It

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