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Out of the Maze: An A-Mazing Way to Get Unstuck

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The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of our accomplishments are due to our beliefs: whether we're confident or insecure, cynical or positive, open-minded or inflexible. But it's difficult to change your beliefs--and with them, your outcomes. Find out how Hem, Haw, and the other characters from Who Moved My Cheese? deal with this challenge.


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The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of The posthumous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?, the classic parable that became a worldwide sensation. Who Moved My Cheese? offered millions of readers relief for an evergreen problem: unanticipated and unwelcome change. Now its long-awaited sequel digs deeper, to show how readers can adapt their beliefs and achieve better results in any field. Johnson's theme is that all of our accomplishments are due to our beliefs: whether we're confident or insecure, cynical or positive, open-minded or inflexible. But it's difficult to change your beliefs--and with them, your outcomes. Find out how Hem, Haw, and the other characters from Who Moved My Cheese? deal with this challenge.

30 review for Out of the Maze: An A-Mazing Way to Get Unstuck

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy-GallivantingPages

    Does it lift you up or hold you down? Simplifies life’s challenges and teaches you how to adapt and get after your goals.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    A sequel to Who Moved My Cheese?. A nice homily about opening your mind to new ideas. It will be a useful tool for making teams think about working better together and bringing everyone on board, even the Luddites. With thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK / Ebury Publishing for a free review copy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lizy

    Out of the Maze is the post-humous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese. It's short and doesn't mince words while addressing questions left over from the first book, namely, "how can I adapt?" Most of the book covers Haw, the Littleperson who's looking for cheese in the maze and is struggling to find it. Haw has to address where he's at, and after finding Hope, he's able to move on toward success. I think it's a great guide for those who feel trapped where they're at.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Letting go of old beliefs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    A business fable and a follow-up to a famous "Who moved my cheese?". Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for sharing the ARC. I see what the author is trying to do here and why fable is chosen to deliver the message... But personally, while I agree with the premises and conclusions - I did not enjoy the delivery style. It felt a little too patronising for my liking - hence my rating. Having said that, if you enjoyed "Who moved my cheese?" - chances are you will enjoy the sequel as well.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kate Ellis

    I first read the prequel to this book Who Moved My Cheese over 15 years ago and found it very helpful. Fortunately I listened to my audio version of Who Moved My Cheese just a few weeks ago. Out of the Maze written by the late Spencer Johnson follows on and is a very quick read. My honest opinion is that I think it would be most helpful as an addition to an edition of Who Moved My Cheese rather than a separate book whilst understanding the reasons behind it being separate. I think the value of Out I first read the prequel to this book Who Moved My Cheese over 15 years ago and found it very helpful. Fortunately I listened to my audio version of Who Moved My Cheese just a few weeks ago. Out of the Maze written by the late Spencer Johnson follows on and is a very quick read. My honest opinion is that I think it would be most helpful as an addition to an edition of Who Moved My Cheese rather than a separate book whilst understanding the reasons behind it being separate. I think the value of Out of the Maze is gained best after reading Who Moved My Cheese and not as a standalone. The reference to Spencer Johnson's life and the way he dealt with his latter months of life serves a very strong testimony and sums up the message of Out of the Maze.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Olga Miret

    Thanks to NetGalley and to Ebury Digital for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. Although Who Moved My Cheese? was published a long time ago (in 1998) and I had seen it around, I only learned more about it when I was working on the translation of a self-help book. The author referred to Johnson’s fable in his text and I had to check it out. When I saw this sequel announced on NetGalley I felt curious. Most of you will be familiar with the first book, but in short, Thanks to NetGalley and to Ebury Digital for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. Although Who Moved My Cheese? was published a long time ago (in 1998) and I had seen it around, I only learned more about it when I was working on the translation of a self-help book. The author referred to Johnson’s fable in his text and I had to check it out. When I saw this sequel announced on NetGalley I felt curious. Most of you will be familiar with the first book, but in short, it is the fable of two mice and two little people who live in a maze and feed on cheese that magically appears every day. Suddenly, after things have been like this for a long time, the cheese disappears. The two mice go as well, seemingly looking for more cheese, but the two little people don’t agree on what to do. One of them decides to try to find more cheese, while the other stays put, convinced that things will go back to the way they were soon enough. As is the case with all good fables, lessons are learned. In this book, the central fable is framed by a discussion group. The class has been talking about the original book, and one of the students asks what happen to the character left behind. The teacher then comes back with a story, which is the follow-up to the previous one, but this time the protagonist is Hem, the character left behind. Throughout the book he meets hope, has to confront his set of beliefs, and learns invaluable lessons. Like the previous one, this book is really short, under 100 pages, and that includes a note from one of the author’s collaborators and some background to this work. The author died from pancreatic cancer in 2017, and the story of how he handled his disease (including a letter he wrote to his cancer) is also an important part of the book. The book, like its predecessor, does not provide brand-new ideas or earth-shattering insights. Having said that, the lessons become easier to remember because they are provided in the format of a fable. Having the distance and the perspective afforded by reading about imaginary characters in an imaginary situation allows people to think about their own lives and find similarities in outlook that might not be welcome if pointed out directly or if our behaviour is confronted head-on. Realising something for oneself is much more effective and causes less resistance than having somebody tell us where we went wrong. The discussion group and its members also provide some examples of real-life situations and how to deal with them. In sum, this is a short book, written in simple language, easy to read, and it can be useful to people who feel stuck in a rut and cannot see a way forward. It would also provide useful and easy read to course facilitators looking into topics such as belief-systems and how to change one’s perspective.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Great book! I liked this even better than Who Moved My Cheese and I feel like this book really completes the original and compliments it quite well. I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so much wisdom through two, easy to read parables. I read this book in a little over an hour and the effort was well worth the rewards. Special thanks to Sergio Sarinana for introducing me to Who Moved My Cheese a Great book! I liked this even better than Who Moved My Cheese and I feel like this book really completes the original and compliments it quite well. I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so much wisdom through two, easy to read parables. I read this book in a little over an hour and the effort was well worth the rewards. Special thanks to Sergio Sarinana for introducing me to Who Moved My Cheese and Out of the Maze!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Human beliefs are divided in two categories: the core and the peripheral. Core are considered your strong beliefs, your values and guiding principles. The more flexible ones , the ones that are easier to change are considered your peripheral principles Like explained in the book, to overcome difficulties, you must adapt to change and not be too confident of your state and status - the only constant thing in life is change. Sometimes altering patterns may appear scary but in essence , essential .

  10. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… Having never read the first book, I did at first wonder if this was only going to appeal to returning audiences. But I don't think it matters in the end – but I still don't think this is a classic. The framing device hammers morals down (and drops into religion, at the worst moment), and the actual 'story' itself is not hugely brilliant. It's a self-help book designed to show how you can change your ideas, break out of comfort zones (either of being or thinking) and discover new possibilit Hmmm… Having never read the first book, I did at first wonder if this was only going to appeal to returning audiences. But I don't think it matters in the end – but I still don't think this is a classic. The framing device hammers morals down (and drops into religion, at the worst moment), and the actual 'story' itself is not hugely brilliant. It's a self-help book designed to show how you can change your ideas, break out of comfort zones (either of being or thinking) and discover new possibilities, which are what you need when change has happened and the Plan A of stopping dead in your tracks really does seem to favour the 'dead' part of things. Oh, and how having hope (or, indeed, Hope), is a help. It's not completely facile, even if it does occur in a weird fantasy maze realm, but it's not brilliant. At times the whole book is either being too wishy-washy or too tub-thumping, but then again, seldom do these books hit the right balance. Or so I believe...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This sequel by the late Dr. Johnson expands on the ‘who moved my cheese’ fable which has been applied to various business thinking concepts and ideologies. It’s not the best business self-help book out there but not the worst. It’s a little bland and repetitive but short enough to get through it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Helpful and insightful addition to the classic, "Who Moved My Cheese." This book examines beliefs, how beliefs keep us from moving forward to find new cheese, and how to overcome and adapt to new beliefs to help create new experiences.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dilip Kanagaraj

    It thoughts how our belief can change anything. Beliefs can lift us up or bring us down. Life is not only in the maze you have to think outside of maze.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Short and sweet with a powerful message. The message is simple in concept that can be impactful if reflectively internalized.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tami Winbush

    Great new thought process. Make sure to read Who Moved my Cheese first. The two books go hand-in-hand and will complement each other. Never be left behind and caught in your own devised "maze". Keep on thinking and have hope.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    I believe this book came into my life in the right moment. I can't express how much I am inspired by the story and how much it motivates me to look for my own "Cheese" and better, "Apples". It inspires readers to think outside of the box (changing your beliefs/thinking) so that you could unlock success (reach endless possibilities & better outcomes). The quote that was written in the book, "changing what you think doesn't change who you are" , really stuck with me. I, like Hew, am still try I believe this book came into my life in the right moment. I can't express how much I am inspired by the story and how much it motivates me to look for my own "Cheese" and better, "Apples". It inspires readers to think outside of the box (changing your beliefs/thinking) so that you could unlock success (reach endless possibilities & better outcomes). The quote that was written in the book, "changing what you think doesn't change who you are" , really stuck with me. I, like Hew, am still trying to get out of the Maze and couldn't be more grateful that this book came and provided guidance to enlighten my 'journey'.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Megan Thomas

    You’ve got to read this for what it is - a parable-sequel, self-help style, simple story about people living in a maze of cheese. It sounds simple truths, but ones that need reiterating often in society and specifically the business world. It’s a sequel, but doesn’t need to be read in conjunction with the first book, Who Moved My Cheese.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nessy Dimitrova

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. I’d rather read about the power of belief in a way that’s not written for 4 year olds. The key message in these blinks: It can be difficult to let go of old sources of happiness or success and the beliefs we develop about them, but it is possible to change those beliefs and find new sources of fulfillment. The key is to cultivate an openness to possibilities, let go of fears and to join forces with other people in our journey through life. Actionable advice: Exami I read this book thanks to Blinkist. I’d rather read about the power of belief in a way that’s not written for 4 year olds. The key message in these blinks: It can be difficult to let go of old sources of happiness or success and the beliefs we develop about them, but it is possible to change those beliefs and find new sources of fulfillment. The key is to cultivate an openness to possibilities, let go of fears and to join forces with other people in our journey through life. Actionable advice: Examine your beliefs. • To examine your beliefs, you can start by dividing them into two categories: Core beliefs and peripheral beliefs. • Your core beliefs are your values and guiding principles – the things you care about, want to see happen in the world and provide you with a sense of purpose. These could range from believing strongly in defending human rights or wanting to alleviate other people’s suffering, to believing in yourself and the idea that your existence serves some sort of greater purpose. These beliefs don’t change, at least not in the short term. They’re at your core. • Around them, you acquire many other beliefs that are more flexible and fleeting. Many of them have to do with the way you think you need to approach your core beliefs. These are the beliefs that are worth examining and possibly changing. For example, someone who wanted to help other people could think that being a doctor was the best way for him to do that – but, upon reflection, he could decide it’s by writing books, a realization that the author himself had. What to read next: Who Moved My Cheese?, by Spencer Johnson You’ve just learned the tale of Hem and the life lessons he discovered on his journey out of the maze. Now would be a great time to discover or revisit the story to which this one was the sequel. The original parable contains more lessons on the nature of change and the secrets to dealing with it. Given the fact that it was a worldwide bestseller, there’s a good chance that you’ve already read it. But even if that’s the case, you can now return to its lessons, consider them in a whole new light and connect them to the lessons of the sequel. Whether you’re new to the book or already familiar with it, we highly recommend checking out the blinks to Who Moved My Cheese?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil Talwar

    Out of the Maze is the post-humous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese. Most of the book covers Haw, the Littleperson who's looking for cheese in the maze and is struggling to find it. Haw has to address where he's at, and after finding Hope, he's able to move on toward success. I think it's a great guide for those who feel trapped where they're at. Great book!I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so muc Out of the Maze is the post-humous sequel to Who Moved My Cheese. Most of the book covers Haw, the Littleperson who's looking for cheese in the maze and is struggling to find it. Haw has to address where he's at, and after finding Hope, he's able to move on toward success. I think it's a great guide for those who feel trapped where they're at. Great book!I will absolutely apply many lessons from this book to my career and my personal life. I really like how author, Spencer Johnson conveyed so much wisdom through two, easy to read parables. I read this book and the effort was well worth the rewards. Helpful and insightful addition to the classic, "Who Moved My Cheese." This book examines beliefs, how beliefs keep us from moving forward to find new cheese, and how to overcome and adapt to new beliefs to help create new experiences. The books picks where the previous one left and tells the story of how you can get out of the maze. Through the story the author reveals that our beliefs are the things that hold us back. As the saying goes if a belief is not helping you should change it so thus the story illustrates when Hem changed his beliefs by dropping the one that put him down and adopting the ones that lift him up, he was able to get out of the maze. I can't express how much I am inspired by the story and how much it motivates me to look for my own "Cheese" and better, "Apples". It inspires readers to think outside of the box. it was an amazing read, fast one for sure. /along with its prequel this book should be read over and over again and shared as much as possible.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colin Marks

    Out of the Maze is a tricky book to review. I haven't read the prequel Who Moved My Cheese, apparently the biggest selling book on Amazon a couple of years after its publication, but I don't believe that's necessary - the first book covers embracing change, this book deals with how inflexible belief systems can be detrimental and restrictive. The writing is fine, the messages useful, and the book educates by way of a fable - a style I'm not fond of as I explained in my reviews for Pig Wrestling Out of the Maze is a tricky book to review. I haven't read the prequel Who Moved My Cheese, apparently the biggest selling book on Amazon a couple of years after its publication, but I don't believe that's necessary - the first book covers embracing change, this book deals with how inflexible belief systems can be detrimental and restrictive. The writing is fine, the messages useful, and the book educates by way of a fable - a style I'm not fond of as I explained in my reviews for Pig Wrestling and the Goal - but that's not why it's hard to review. My problem is the length - it took less than half an hour to read, cover to cover, including the acknowledgements and some details on the author's battle with cancer. Like Pig Wrestling, the author knocks out a dozen or so short proverbs, punchy little 10 word sentences which sound authoritative, then they get padded into a story, someone designs a cover, and bam, a book is produced. This would've been fine as an essay or a magazine article, it just doesn't have the legs for a self-contained book. But given I enjoyed it for what it is, and the price isn't an issue for me (I'm reviewing an ARC), I can only score it on the content, not the package as a whole. So, 4 seems fair to me, but I suspect if you'd paid hard-earned money for it, you would feel differently. Book supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kimberlee

    We bought this book as a gift for our family this past holiday. We did not get to read it together as we had hoped, but I am glad that I made time to read it independently. It tells the story of what happened to Hem after "Who Moved My Cheese?" ended. I have read "Who Moved My Cheese?" three times, and I did not find this sequel disappointing at all. It states some basic but important and often not verbalized truths through a creative lens. I love the name of the new character that is added in t We bought this book as a gift for our family this past holiday. We did not get to read it together as we had hoped, but I am glad that I made time to read it independently. It tells the story of what happened to Hem after "Who Moved My Cheese?" ended. I have read "Who Moved My Cheese?" three times, and I did not find this sequel disappointing at all. It states some basic but important and often not verbalized truths through a creative lens. I love the name of the new character that is added in this story. Recently I have been learning about ACT (acceptance and commitment therapy), which has a lot to do with beliefs and being "psychologically flexible". In church, we've been learning about being anchored to hope without being enslaved to our past, anxious about our future, or blind to the present. I felt like this book so fit with the other things I've been hearing, learning about and investing mind time in. It was very timely that I read this simple fable.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Scott

    The sequel to “Who Moved my Cheese” picks up right where Hem and Haw left off, and is another terrific book to pick up and read when he you feel like you’re in a rut or are looking for good life/leadership lessons. Through a wonderful, poignant anecdote the author discusses the importance of being adaptable, open-minded, and being imaginative. A new character, “Hope” becomes part of the narrative, and as the title suggests, helps our struggling character, Hem believe there could very well be mor The sequel to “Who Moved my Cheese” picks up right where Hem and Haw left off, and is another terrific book to pick up and read when he you feel like you’re in a rut or are looking for good life/leadership lessons. Through a wonderful, poignant anecdote the author discusses the importance of being adaptable, open-minded, and being imaginative. A new character, “Hope” becomes part of the narrative, and as the title suggests, helps our struggling character, Hem believe there could very well be more than just the maze itself. I’d suggest reading Who Moved my Cheese before diving into this, but it is a succinct and natural continuation from that, and if you enjoyed the initial book, you’ll like this one and its new lessons as well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Refilwe Mashile

    I like the shift of this book from Who moved my cheese. Haw was the hero of who moved my cheese. But thinking about a whole lot of people who are like Hem, who feel stuck and can't adapt to change. I think this book is really necessary. Beliefs can indeed prison a person, and I like how this book has used simple instances to take us through the journey of changing our beliefs. I personally love how the book, tackles our doubts, fears and negativity. If you want to see better things, Changing you I like the shift of this book from Who moved my cheese. Haw was the hero of who moved my cheese. But thinking about a whole lot of people who are like Hem, who feel stuck and can't adapt to change. I think this book is really necessary. Beliefs can indeed prison a person, and I like how this book has used simple instances to take us through the journey of changing our beliefs. I personally love how the book, tackles our doubts, fears and negativity. If you want to see better things, Changing your Thoughts is a start. I really loved the book. May the Author continue to rest in power. He has left us with a beautiful gift, that will sustain us for many more years. RIP Dr Spencer Johnson.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark T

    Read on Blinkist. It is a sequel of Johnson’s famous book - Who Moved My Cheese? The key message of this book: It can be difficult to let go of old sources of happiness or success and the beliefs we develop about them, but it is possible to change those beliefs and find new sources of fulfillment. The key is to cultivate an openness to possibilities, let go of fears and to join forces with other people in our journey through life. The story of Hem, Haw and Hope will be familiar to most people and Read on Blinkist. It is a sequel of Johnson’s famous book - Who Moved My Cheese? The key message of this book: It can be difficult to let go of old sources of happiness or success and the beliefs we develop about them, but it is possible to change those beliefs and find new sources of fulfillment. The key is to cultivate an openness to possibilities, let go of fears and to join forces with other people in our journey through life. The story of Hem, Haw and Hope will be familiar to most people and inspirational. Not a game-changer but a good reminder to all of us who feel stuck in the rut. Suggested further reading: Who Moved My Cheese - Spencer Johnson The original parable contains more lessons on the nature of change and the secrets to dealing with it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    SyaMimi

    I am absolutely enjoyed this short story, sequel to Who Moved My Cheese, about Haw struggling to find cheese in the Maze. From previous, dealing with unwelcome change and to adapt to it, now is to deal with belief and it's okay to change it. This time, Haw meets Hope, another Littleperson in the Maze, who help Haw to trigger questions in his quest to find more source of food which lead them of of the Maze. Haw found that some beliefs that can keep us from moving forward. A simple change of mind wo I am absolutely enjoyed this short story, sequel to Who Moved My Cheese, about Haw struggling to find cheese in the Maze. From previous, dealing with unwelcome change and to adapt to it, now is to deal with belief and it's okay to change it. This time, Haw meets Hope, another Littleperson in the Maze, who help Haw to trigger questions in his quest to find more source of food which lead them of of the Maze. Haw found that some beliefs that can keep us from moving forward. A simple change of mind would unstuck us from where we stand. A good read indeed and can be applied in life. 4.6/5.0

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gaynor Thomas

    This is the follow-on to the bestselling book on change, "Who Moved My Cheese?". Using a simple parable, Spencer Johnson makes the powerful argument that our beliefs shape our circumstances and that by changing those beliefs we can quite literally change our world. Of course, in reality the world stays the same, but the important truth is that we can change how we perceive it, see things differently, and find our way out of the maze. An interesting little book that makes you think about the way This is the follow-on to the bestselling book on change, "Who Moved My Cheese?". Using a simple parable, Spencer Johnson makes the powerful argument that our beliefs shape our circumstances and that by changing those beliefs we can quite literally change our world. Of course, in reality the world stays the same, but the important truth is that we can change how we perceive it, see things differently, and find our way out of the maze. An interesting little book that makes you think about the way you see things, and realise that "there are no limits to what you can believe!" Thank you to the publishers for providing me with a copy via NetGalley, in return for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ned

    Out of the Maze is the sequel of the Who Moved My Cheese. The books picks where the previous one left and tells the story of how you can get out of the maze. Through the story the author reveals that our beliefs are the things that hold us back. As the saying goes if a belief is not helping you should change it so thus the story illustrates when Hem changed his beliefs by dropping the one that put him down and adopting the ones that lift him up, he was able to get out of the maze. The maze is fi Out of the Maze is the sequel of the Who Moved My Cheese. The books picks where the previous one left and tells the story of how you can get out of the maze. Through the story the author reveals that our beliefs are the things that hold us back. As the saying goes if a belief is not helping you should change it so thus the story illustrates when Hem changed his beliefs by dropping the one that put him down and adopting the ones that lift him up, he was able to get out of the maze. The maze is figurative for everything that we are stuck in and seems like there is no way out. If we figure out what lifts up and pursuit we can get out of the maze.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth Walker

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Read Harder Challenge 2019 #17 A business book I read Who Moved My Cheese as a teenager, and it was very influential in how I have approached my career. This is a continuation of the story of Hem, who in the original book remains stuck and doesn't make the changes needed to find the cheese. In this story, we learn how Hem becomes unstuck by re-examining his beliefs, and learning how to think outside the maze. I can see how this simple advice can be very powerful, but I think it's probably a much h Read Harder Challenge 2019 #17 A business book I read Who Moved My Cheese as a teenager, and it was very influential in how I have approached my career. This is a continuation of the story of Hem, who in the original book remains stuck and doesn't make the changes needed to find the cheese. In this story, we learn how Hem becomes unstuck by re-examining his beliefs, and learning how to think outside the maze. I can see how this simple advice can be very powerful, but I think it's probably a much harder place to learn from than the original advice of adapting to change. That's why I gave this 4 stars instead of 5.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Hagedorn

    Read. This. Book. Seriously. It helps if you’ve read Who Moved My Cheese? first, so do yourself a favor and read them in order. Just read them. They may seem simplistic to you, but read it a second time, then a third. If you still think it’s too simple, move on. You just aren’t in the right mindset to get it yet. But come back to it. If you feel stuck in your job, your relationships, your life.....read the book. Packed full of wisdom and written in an easy to digest style. But don’t let that foo Read. This. Book. Seriously. It helps if you’ve read Who Moved My Cheese? first, so do yourself a favor and read them in order. Just read them. They may seem simplistic to you, but read it a second time, then a third. If you still think it’s too simple, move on. You just aren’t in the right mindset to get it yet. But come back to it. If you feel stuck in your job, your relationships, your life.....read the book. Packed full of wisdom and written in an easy to digest style. But don’t let that fool you. You’ll be moved. You’ll find Hope. You’ll see how to truly get Out of the Maze.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Great parable follow up to "Who moved my cheese". If you ever wondered what happened to Hem from the first book, here's your answer. A lesson based on how shifting your mindset impacts your life and the steps you go through to get there. "Old beliefs do not lead to new cheese" is the main message. I also appreciated this one "some beliefs can hold you down. Other beliefs can lift you up". Great way to evaluate what's really working and when to try something new. "I dont think ot works to launch a Great parable follow up to "Who moved my cheese". If you ever wondered what happened to Hem from the first book, here's your answer. A lesson based on how shifting your mindset impacts your life and the steps you go through to get there. "Old beliefs do not lead to new cheese" is the main message. I also appreciated this one "some beliefs can hold you down. Other beliefs can lift you up". Great way to evaluate what's really working and when to try something new. "I dont think ot works to launch a new quest with old baggage." Quick read.

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