kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Sugar Land

Availability: Ready to download

A southern fried novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that's been called a "ravishing debut" in a starred Kirkus Review and "writing at its finest" by the NY Journal of Books. It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend―who also happens to be a girl. Terrified, Miss Dara takes a job at Imperial State Prison Farm for men. Once there, A southern fried novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that's been called a "ravishing debut" in a starred Kirkus Review and "writing at its finest" by the NY Journal of Books. It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend―who also happens to be a girl. Terrified, Miss Dara takes a job at Imperial State Prison Farm for men. Once there, she befriends inmate and soon-to-be legendary blues singer Lead Belly, who sings his way out (true story)―but only after he makes her promise to free herself from her own prison. SUGAR LAND is a triumphant novel that manages to be funny and endearing even as it tangles with race, class, and the fate of misfits. "A powerful paperback that doesn't pull any emotional punches, Sugar Land is a debut you don't want to miss." - Bustle "With a lively sense of humor and a great sense of place, tammy lynne stoner’s debut is a Southern novel from a voice that rings true ... with keen insight into race, class, gender identity and social norms, Sugar Land is the story of a woman learning to come home to herself." - BookPage "Stoner creates a captivating story for the ages—a young, southern girl in the 1920s who becomes a ballsy broad in a double-wide...This heartbreaking and hysterical book inspires us with a brave and unusual life.” —Jillian Lauren, New York Times bestselling author of Some Girls: My Life in a Harem and Everything You Ever Wanted


Compare
kode adsense disini

A southern fried novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that's been called a "ravishing debut" in a starred Kirkus Review and "writing at its finest" by the NY Journal of Books. It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend―who also happens to be a girl. Terrified, Miss Dara takes a job at Imperial State Prison Farm for men. Once there, A southern fried novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation that's been called a "ravishing debut" in a starred Kirkus Review and "writing at its finest" by the NY Journal of Books. It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend―who also happens to be a girl. Terrified, Miss Dara takes a job at Imperial State Prison Farm for men. Once there, she befriends inmate and soon-to-be legendary blues singer Lead Belly, who sings his way out (true story)―but only after he makes her promise to free herself from her own prison. SUGAR LAND is a triumphant novel that manages to be funny and endearing even as it tangles with race, class, and the fate of misfits. "A powerful paperback that doesn't pull any emotional punches, Sugar Land is a debut you don't want to miss." - Bustle "With a lively sense of humor and a great sense of place, tammy lynne stoner’s debut is a Southern novel from a voice that rings true ... with keen insight into race, class, gender identity and social norms, Sugar Land is the story of a woman learning to come home to herself." - BookPage "Stoner creates a captivating story for the ages—a young, southern girl in the 1920s who becomes a ballsy broad in a double-wide...This heartbreaking and hysterical book inspires us with a brave and unusual life.” —Jillian Lauren, New York Times bestselling author of Some Girls: My Life in a Harem and Everything You Ever Wanted

30 review for Sugar Land

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lark Benobi

    Early in this novel the teen-aged Dara kisses the first great love of her life, Rhodie, and in a burst of insight and joy she realizes she is a lesbian. The very next day Dara overhears her uncle, the town sheriff, laughing with another officer about how the two of them had cured four women of their ‘perversion’ by raping them the night before, and in second burst of insight Dara realizes she will never be safe in her home town, and runs away. If this sort of abrupt, let’s-not-waste-any-time stor Early in this novel the teen-aged Dara kisses the first great love of her life, Rhodie, and in a burst of insight and joy she realizes she is a lesbian. The very next day Dara overhears her uncle, the town sheriff, laughing with another officer about how the two of them had cured four women of their ‘perversion’ by raping them the night before, and in second burst of insight Dara realizes she will never be safe in her home town, and runs away. If this sort of abrupt, let’s-not-waste-any-time storytelling is okay with you, then you will likely enjoy Sugar Land very much. I did. The novel has a level of sweetness that floats above its main story of homophobia and racism, and the sweetness blurs the edges of things, so that the harsh parts of the story never get too difficult to read. In this way it reminded me of Under the Udala Trees, another coming-of-age-while-lesbian story that was thematically true but never so violent that I needed to look away. For some stories I need this level of non-reality, frankly. A gentle, upbeat book with a happy ending sometimes speaks to me more than full-on reality, because I can keep reading. The story that unspools here is beautifully told and I felt safe within these pages. Another thing I loved about this novel is its depiction of minimum-wage work. Like Dara I have also worked in a cafeteria, and in all-male-except-me settings. I’ll never forget some of the things left on the cafeteria trays coming at me on their way to the conveyor belt to the dishwasher, or the way it feels to hash up slop eight hours a day, or the general awfulness of men in a group when you’re the only woman around, or how your hair smells at the end of the day. This way of life is so well portrayed here that I was almost overcome a few times by bad-gravy memories as I read. While the people in Sugar Land never feel exactly real, they do feel like fictional people I cared about, and whose welfare I worried about.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carmel Hanes

    I really wanted to like this book, but had mixed reactions to it. I enjoyed the first half and would have given that part 4 stars. But somewhere towards the 50-60% point my interest began to wane, and I'd give the rest of the book two and a half to three stars. I've tried to figure out why. I enjoyed getting to know young Miss Dara. I was touched and drawn into the angst of realizing you are a woman who loves another woman in a time when that was not only completely unacceptable, but dangerous. I I really wanted to like this book, but had mixed reactions to it. I enjoyed the first half and would have given that part 4 stars. But somewhere towards the 50-60% point my interest began to wane, and I'd give the rest of the book two and a half to three stars. I've tried to figure out why. I enjoyed getting to know young Miss Dara. I was touched and drawn into the angst of realizing you are a woman who loves another woman in a time when that was not only completely unacceptable, but dangerous. I cared about Dara and what she was experiencing, and felt her pain when she felt forced to leave the familiar behind, trying through relocation to change her nature (or at least tamp it out of sight). This rang true to the experience of many, even to this day. I enjoyed the interpersonal dynamics between Dara and her co-workers and Lead Belly, and envisioning this scared, yet tough young woman making a place for herself in an unlikely setting. The challenges, quiet triumphs and reasons to be afraid were all palpable with writing that drew me in. Once the story moved more to family dynamics, and the characters I had enjoyed virtually disappeared, I felt I was now looking through a window and no longer inside the characters. From that point on it felt as though I was only getting in about a quarter of an inch, when I prefer to be embedded in the story. I had to force myself to finish, and mostly skimmed. It might be that I enjoy a more compact story, going more deeply into the smaller world, and am less able to sustain interest in a story that covers more time and change. I was unsatisfied with what happened between Dara and Rhodie, although it's probably a fairly accurate portrayal of what often occurs between people. We often don't talk about what is most important, and leave unfinished business when we go. I was also unsatisfied with the last contact between Dara and Lead Belly. A moment that could have been much deeper, it seemed to skim the surface of what had been an important relationship for each of them. A mixed read for me, with a strong beginning but second half that seemed less robust.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dianah

    Stoner's debut story of a young woman trying to find her way in the world is both light and profound. Dara falls in love with her best friend, and the bliss she feels is like nothing ever before. Events occur which derail her future plans, so Dara regroups and tiptoes her way into a different kind of life. Sweet and serious, Sugar Land is a great coming-of-age story that looks at both the euphoria and the despair of first and all-consuming love. Fans of Fannie Flagg will be thrilled with Sugar L Stoner's debut story of a young woman trying to find her way in the world is both light and profound. Dara falls in love with her best friend, and the bliss she feels is like nothing ever before. Events occur which derail her future plans, so Dara regroups and tiptoes her way into a different kind of life. Sweet and serious, Sugar Land is a great coming-of-age story that looks at both the euphoria and the despair of first and all-consuming love. Fans of Fannie Flagg will be thrilled with Sugar Land.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Sugar Land is a great Southern fiction debut! Reminiscent of Fannie Flagg, this story made me sad and made me laugh. I love the resilience of the main character, Dara, throughout all the ups and downs of her life. Tammy Lynne Stoner has written a solid debut novel! I can’t wait for her next book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    Full disclosure - the author is a very dear childhood friend. Being a supporter of friends and all things women entrepreneur, I bought the book and read it to be supportive. And I LOVED it. No, really...I absolutely loved it. If I didn't love it, I would never take the time to write a review. I sit here now with a feeling of contentment having just finished this sweet, beautiful story and a little sad that it's over. Tammy's writing is extraordinary. She creates a vivid and clear picture of each Full disclosure - the author is a very dear childhood friend. Being a supporter of friends and all things women entrepreneur, I bought the book and read it to be supportive. And I LOVED it. No, really...I absolutely loved it. If I didn't love it, I would never take the time to write a review. I sit here now with a feeling of contentment having just finished this sweet, beautiful story and a little sad that it's over. Tammy's writing is extraordinary. She creates a vivid and clear picture of each character and scene. Example: "The warden, always a lover of the practical, shushed him. 'Ladies come in all shapes and sizes and deserve our respect, Ken.' When he said that, it made it somehow all right for me to sit with my legs uncrossed. It made it OK that I didn't carry a purse. It made it ok that makeup felt like a colorful lie on my face." And another favorite, highly relatable quote, "I left her room wondering how many people I would hurt because I cared what others thought." There are just too many examples of superb use of language to list here. I often fight books and plots, trying to figure out the ending. This one was in no way predictable, gratuitous, or forced. She builds scenarios and relationships that are believable but often surprising. If you are in the mood to curl up with a book that will leave you feeling like you just met a bunch of new friends, this is the one. Not only is it a great read but it would make a terrific book club selection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Gotta love an author who publishes her first novel at age 50. Stoner takes us deep into Fannie Flagg territory in this novel that follows a young lesbian from the 1920s up through the 1960s. It's hokey at times, but the characters are memorable if a bit broadly drawn, and the humor and sweetness make it an enjoyable read. 3.5 stars rounding up to 4.

  7. 5 out of 5

    SUSAN *Nevertheless,she persisted*

    Loved this book. Would recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I liked a lot of things about this book. I thought that the voice was done quite well, and just in general I think I’ve had a pull toward period stories lately. It’s a story about self-acceptance and sexuality, following the main character from her young adulthood in the 1920’s in South Texas through late middle age in the 1960’s, as she learns to be both independent and to come to understand and accept herself as a lesbian. I think one of the valuable things about taking on sexuality and things I liked a lot of things about this book. I thought that the voice was done quite well, and just in general I think I’ve had a pull toward period stories lately. It’s a story about self-acceptance and sexuality, following the main character from her young adulthood in the 1920’s in South Texas through late middle age in the 1960’s, as she learns to be both independent and to come to understand and accept herself as a lesbian. I think one of the valuable things about taking on sexuality and things like nonbinary gender in a period story like this is that it reaffirms that LGBTQ+ people have always been around. There were some parts that I found a bit jarring, particularly with respect to the main character’s relationship to her weight—I wasn’t quite sure if it came off as fatphobic or not, though since the book is told from a pretty close first-person perspective, it’s just as likely that this is more coming from the character than from the book, if that makes sense. In any case, I liked the book quite well, and I’m glad I read it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Marshea

    Sugar Land is difficult to pin down as it spans years and follows a characters as she discovers the many iterations of herself. From fleeing forbidden love to finding friendship in prison to ultimately discovering that being true to yourself is what sets us all free, Nana Dara is a one of a kind character. She is at times forceful and at other time hesitant, confident and insecure, reflecting the dualities in all our personalities. It's true she is a lesbian, but she is no token character, she's Sugar Land is difficult to pin down as it spans years and follows a characters as she discovers the many iterations of herself. From fleeing forbidden love to finding friendship in prison to ultimately discovering that being true to yourself is what sets us all free, Nana Dara is a one of a kind character. She is at times forceful and at other time hesitant, confident and insecure, reflecting the dualities in all our personalities. It's true she is a lesbian, but she is no token character, she's a fully realized human being with all her qualities and flaws on show for us. The writing in Sugar Land is impeccable. Stoner has a touch both deft and light that conveys layers of meaning in simple descriptions. I cannot recommend this book enough. Don't listen to my blathering... go get yourself a copy. This is one debut you do not want to miss.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    4.5

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Beautifully written. Sugar Land is the story of a Texas woman who attempts to sequester herself away from the world by going to work in a prison for men. It’s a heartbreaking start to a rich life of love and joy. There are so many great characters in this novel, and the setting is rich with historical detail and gritty Southern charm.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hilary Zaid

    Stoner is a brilliant writer. Her life of a Southern woman from the 20s through the 1970s is painful, moving, and, above all, funny. Netflix, Hulu and/or Amazon would be fools not to option the film rights to this warm, big-hearted, tender and humane story, whose language is gorgeous on the page and whose characters and drama cry out for the screen. Women with an affinity for lady friends will find this work an especially satisfying read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    DNF at page 32. The story synopsis sounded great, maybe if I had given it more time and reached the part where Dara evolved into (as one positive blurb put it) "a ballsy broad in a double-wide" I would have liked it as much as some of my GoodReads friends. But I was not in the mood for the cornpone of the first 32 pages, and even the promise of Leadbelly couldn't keep me going. I should beware comparisons to Fannie Flagg.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    A southern coming of age story about learning to come to terms with life and what makes your heart ring true. Set in the twenties, a young woman named Dara escapes from Midland, Texas only to run straight into a prison. Dara works in the kitchen and tries to put her past and her great romance to bed. She fell hard for her best friend but is too concerned with what the consequences could be if anyone ever discovered her attraction to girls. Safely ensconced in a prison filled with men, Dara soon A southern coming of age story about learning to come to terms with life and what makes your heart ring true. Set in the twenties, a young woman named Dara escapes from Midland, Texas only to run straight into a prison. Dara works in the kitchen and tries to put her past and her great romance to bed. She fell hard for her best friend but is too concerned with what the consequences could be if anyone ever discovered her attraction to girls. Safely ensconced in a prison filled with men, Dara soon befriends Leadbelly, a blues singer destined for stardom, and learns that love is what you make it. Sugar Land follows Dara's journey over the decades as she learns to do more than accept the lot life has given her. Brilliantly executed by the talented Donna Postel who throws just the right amount of southern charm into this novel of acceptance and love. Courageous, captivating, and charming, filled with characters that readers won't be able to stop thinking about. For fans of LGBTQ+ romance, historical fiction, and southern charm. - Erin Cataldi, Johnson Co. Public Library, Franklin, IN

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jean Baxendale

    I loved this book... very thought provoking...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Siel Ju

    “I came to understand that life isn’t moments of going from black to white; It’s letting the dawn come up as slowly as it needs, until you realize it’s a new day.” * Sugar Land tells the story of Dara, a Southern girl in the 1920s who has a brief love affair with her girlfriend Rhodie — then decides to hide her lesbianism by exiling herself as a cook in a men’s prison. The beginning’s pretty grim but overall the novel tells a funny and exuberant tale of a woman’s long coming of age story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Morgan

    Sugar Land is the story of Discovery, rejection, fear, denial, acceptance and completion. The life long story of Nana Dora encompasses all of these feelings and then some. I thoroughly enjoyed this journey with its timely story of self Discovery. I can highly recommend this book to anyone questioning their lot in life and to those curious about other people's life experiences.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I had high hopes for this book, but it turned out to be a little too sentimental for my taste. Also, the Huddie storyline didn't really seem to fit the novel at all. It felt like the author was trying to build the plot around Dara and Huddie's friendship initially, but it just got lost along the way. I can't decide if the book would have been better if that relationship was fleshed out more, or if it would have been better if that storyline was just eliminated all together.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Reggie

    It’s the 1920’s and Dara has fallen in love with her best friend, Rhodie. After being found out she exiles herself to work in a men’s prison in Sugar Land, TX. She soon finds out how not being able to accept yourself is a prison of its own. The rest of her life is her busting out of that prison. There was such an unapologetic frankness to the novel I appreciated and feel lighter in spirit just having read it. What a great read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bamboozlepig

    Full of hokey similes and cliches, yet the writing style was rather flat. Just couldn't get into it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I loved the first half of Stoner's Sugar Land but couldn't get over the blatant fatphobia.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daisy Mae

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amity Harcourt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Murphy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andres Benjumea

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.