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James Bond: The Body

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What makes James Bond? Brain. Gut. Heart. Lungs. Body… …and what about the soul? In James Bond: The Body, writer Aleš Kot and a group of incredible artists present a Bond tale like no other Dynamite has told to date. Each chapter a separate tale. All connected by the end. And James Bond, worn down and pushing perhaps well beyond the breaking point…


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What makes James Bond? Brain. Gut. Heart. Lungs. Body… …and what about the soul? In James Bond: The Body, writer Aleš Kot and a group of incredible artists present a Bond tale like no other Dynamite has told to date. Each chapter a separate tale. All connected by the end. And James Bond, worn down and pushing perhaps well beyond the breaking point…

30 review for James Bond: The Body

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The name’s Bland. James Bland. At least it is when Ales Kot is writing him! Bond fights an assassin. Then a terrorist. Then some Nazi arms dealers. He chills out with some lady in the mountains. He fights another bad guy. And that’s James Bond: The Body. Still awake? Me too - barely. This anthology is sooooo unimaginative - Bond by-the-numbers. It was kinda shocking to see Bond waterboarding someone (does Ales Kot even like Bond? Why is he writing this comic - Kot seems very anti-authoritarian t The name’s Bland. James Bland. At least it is when Ales Kot is writing him! Bond fights an assassin. Then a terrorist. Then some Nazi arms dealers. He chills out with some lady in the mountains. He fights another bad guy. And that’s James Bond: The Body. Still awake? Me too - barely. This anthology is sooooo unimaginative - Bond by-the-numbers. It was kinda shocking to see Bond waterboarding someone (does Ales Kot even like Bond? Why is he writing this comic - Kot seems very anti-authoritarian to me) but otherwise the stories here were instantly forgettable. Dull writing, very weak characterisation all round and the art is nothing special. Ales Kot is Borefinger – he’s the man, the man with the snoozy touch!

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    “Whatever glamour we see in Bond—it’s not worth the price”—Ales Kot So this is book seven in the “new Bond” Dynamite comics series, the intent of which is to bring Bond up to the present, offering various artists’ takes on how to bring the tone of the original, Ian Fleming's Bond and not the Sean Connery film Bond, into contemporary Bond stories. In some ways all of them can be seen as reflections on Bond and Fleming. For instance, in this and some of the other Dynamite comics volumes James Bond “Whatever glamour we see in Bond—it’s not worth the price”—Ales Kot So this is book seven in the “new Bond” Dynamite comics series, the intent of which is to bring Bond up to the present, offering various artists’ takes on how to bring the tone of the original, Ian Fleming's Bond and not the Sean Connery film Bond, into contemporary Bond stories. In some ways all of them can be seen as reflections on Bond and Fleming. For instance, in this and some of the other Dynamite comics volumes James Bond is much more violent than in the squeaky clean films, and more of the brooding existentialist you find him to be in the early Fleming books. Yes, James is also a “woman’s man,” in some of the books, but he’s also more of an invent-your-survival killing machine than an MI6 Mr. Suave Martini Gadget Guy. More of a bourbon man, yes, but also less escapist fun we have associated with the Bond franchise. This more tortured Bond is the Bond Kot is interested in. So as you can imagine, some of these twenty-first century Bond tales are a mixed bag. The best of the bunch so far has been the volume of Warren Ellis, imo. But this very volume is one such mixed bag itself, written by Ales Kot, and drawn by different artists. There isn’t an attempt to make the art styles sync in any way, or to even make the Bonds look alike. He’s on steroids/testosterone in the contemporary fashion in one, then leanly muscular in the next. That is clearly deliberate in this volume; the thing that unites all the stories is that they were written by Kot and that each issue features action in terms of Bond’s body, as in The Heart, Lungs, and so on. It takes an opportunity to reflect on Bond and his legacy. Each volume is connected to injuries he has suffered, which correspond with psychological injuries. The last story is an attempt to tie things together, connect them all to one larger story of Bond and The Damage Done. There’s a tone in Kot’s writing here I was having trouble fixing on that I was helped with by reading the afterword, where Kot says of Bond that he is an “imperialist, colonialist construct,” and also racist and misogynist, too, in that he is a white man who uses women of various ethnicities “without regard to their well-being.” Now, Bond as lover is one of the chief reasons both men and women (okay, more men than women, at a glance at the Goodreads ratings/reviews) read Bond, so we are getting into touchy territory here, I know. But Kot has his various points to make, and he makes his various them throughout this volume without losing sight of him as a human being. So I reread it from the perspective of his afterword and I began to understand what he was doing. Example: Bond is working undercover at some soiree, out to find a guy who is going to try to kill a woman. Bond’s protecting this woman. We don’t know why the guy would kill the woman or why Bond would protect her. At one point another woman calls him a “hunk meat mountain.” I almost stopped reading right there, I’ll admit it, on first read. Why, that isn’t Bond language! Or, on reread, maybe it is, in that when Bond walks in the room women all turn their heads, and he makes his choice of them if wants to. He’s a body, and “his” women are bodies. And Bond in this first issue is not the lean Sean Connery, but is seen here almost as Thor and Hulk are depicted, and even Batman now, with monster pecs and arms. He’s the contemporary muscular hyper-masculine male. He’s male eye candy; he’s a body! On reread I see Kot as deconstructing him in an anti-colonialist fashion. Bond figures out who is the assassin, in a room full of white rich people. Why, surprise, it is as it was in Fleming’s day as he wrote it, the swarthy dark-skinned guy! So Bond kills this guy, saves a rich woman, and Bond finds a note on the guy, a goodbye note explaining why he happened to be doing this hit job--forced to do so through poverty and strong-arming, and telling his family he loves him. This part of the story would not have happened in Fleming books--sympathy for the assassin, seeing things from his point of view. But afterwards, Bond feels badly about having killed this guy. When the doc offers him pain meds he declines: “I want it to hurt.” In another issue or chapter here, Bond actually waterboards a woman who is critical of England’s continued colonialist legacy, from 1763—when England gave blankets infected with small pox to indigenous Americans on orders from military high command--through Margaret Thatcher to Brexit. The woman says to Bond: You just follow orders, doing what the government wants you to do, right? You’re part of this “great country.” Whew! Political critique in a Bond book??! I can see why this is a low-rated Bond book, because it is actually a critique of Bond as unquestioning imperialist representative, but it is good and interesting as a fresh angle. And you know, it is also part of Fleming's Bond. In another issue/chapter Bond is talking to a bunch of white nationalist arms dealers, and (spoiler alert), Bond ends up slaughtering ALL of them. Would James Bond do this?! Well, Fleming’s Bond WAS very violent, not the suave Connery that was more a lover than a fighter. But we see what the legacy of violence might have been for secret agents like 007 who only get assigned those numbers IF they are killers. Bond pays for killing, in body and soul, but he also IS a killer. Do we really want to slaughter all the neo-Nazi haters out there? In the final chapter there’s a chat in a pub between fellow agent Franz Leiter and Bond as Leiter arranges for a guy to be killed in the pub. The guy dies, and they go on drinking. There’s a certain level of anguish, depression, existential angst in this volume that you find in the early Fleming Bonds—or in Goldfinger, where there is an extended meditation on death, and what it means to kill people and have your own brushes with death. Kot in places is not unsympathetic to Bond, the killing machine; he finds him complex, both troubling and troubled. So, again, the Goodreads rating for this is low as I said and I’m not surprised. There’s not much fun action, because it's not, when you come down to it, really fun action to kill people. There’s a lot of talk, because this one is primarily reflective. It’s a very dark socio-political commentary on Bond in the current climate, with neo-Nazis, extra-judicial torture, and the world going to hell. I have already begun reading Goldfinger (for the first time) and will not be able to keep this critique out of my head as I read on. I think Kot is brave and smart to have done this work WITHIN a Bond series! I can’t say I loved it, but I admire the heck out of it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Congratulations Ales Kot. You've managed to make James Bond boring. Six loosely connected solo stories, most of them consisting of sitting around talking and Kot isn't enough of a wordsmith to make that interesting. But even the issues that feature more action like when Bond is chasing after a guy with a bomb aren't interesting due to the obtuse narration. This just doesn't feel like Bond. In fact, if Bond's name was stripped out of this, you'd just think this was another generic spy thriller wr Congratulations Ales Kot. You've managed to make James Bond boring. Six loosely connected solo stories, most of them consisting of sitting around talking and Kot isn't enough of a wordsmith to make that interesting. But even the issues that feature more action like when Bond is chasing after a guy with a bomb aren't interesting due to the obtuse narration. This just doesn't feel like Bond. In fact, if Bond's name was stripped out of this, you'd just think this was another generic spy thriller written by Ales Kot. There's a different artist on each issue with varying degrees of skill. Received a review copy from Dynamite and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I received this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This is the seventh volume of the James Bond series, and it keeps getting better. In this volume, we get even deeper into the psyche of Bond as he tries to unravel a tangled web involving Afghan assassins, deadly biological weapons, neo-Nazi gangs, supersmart scientists switching sides, and of course, EU and American politics. It was also quite cool how the author tied it all into injuries that Bond has experienced.

  5. 4 out of 5

    San

    Review to come

  6. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This is really good. A series done in a style similar to Kot's Zero, with each issue featuring artwork by a different artist, and an episodic nature tied to a different part of Bond's body--heart, lungs, etc.--as he takes part in a mission or recovers from one. The various stories don't seem to have any connection to each other until the final chapter, featuring Felix Leiter, suggests that they all relate to a single conspiracy, which Kot explains in an interview in the extras, he might come bac This is really good. A series done in a style similar to Kot's Zero, with each issue featuring artwork by a different artist, and an episodic nature tied to a different part of Bond's body--heart, lungs, etc.--as he takes part in a mission or recovers from one. The various stories don't seem to have any connection to each other until the final chapter, featuring Felix Leiter, suggests that they all relate to a single conspiracy, which Kot explains in an interview in the extras, he might come back and follow up on in another series. Here's hoping he gets the chance. This is one of, if not the best Bond series that Dynamite has put out to date. Strong recommendation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    I've never been a James Bond fan. Never grew up with the character, other than playing Golden Eye. I got bored too quickly with the marathons. What seemed so stylish THEN seemed so dated to me me Now. My other exposures had been through other media, such as Casino Royale via the book, the parody and the recent film--which I actually enjoyed. In many ways, James Bond was wish-fulfillment that I didn't wish to embody. He was tall, annoyingly charming. Catch my surprise with this recent spat of qual I've never been a James Bond fan. Never grew up with the character, other than playing Golden Eye. I got bored too quickly with the marathons. What seemed so stylish THEN seemed so dated to me me Now. My other exposures had been through other media, such as Casino Royale via the book, the parody and the recent film--which I actually enjoyed. In many ways, James Bond was wish-fulfillment that I didn't wish to embody. He was tall, annoyingly charming. Catch my surprise with this recent spat of quality writers--with Warren Ellis, and now Ales Kot. Kot writes the character if he caught a bit of self-awareness. Awareness that he's part of the military industrial complex, awareness that he's a womanizer and a perhaps a misogynist, and that he has a duty to QUESTION Queen and Country. The fact that this is now canonical, and not just an emulation (i.e. Kingsman, Zero, etc.) makes it all the more special. The character has actually been allowed to grow, imo. Rather than put back in the box and just come back shiny, new and different every few years. Let's hope these "changes" stick.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    I suppose it's natural that a writer as sceptical of state power as Ales Kot keeps being drawn to writing secret agents; they're what that power looks like when the lights are off and the need to put on a nice front is removed. But whereas his own creations such as Zero can really dig into that, it leaves him in a more awkward position when he's playing with someone else's toy such as Agent Coulson or, here, the exemplar of the species. And perhaps that tension is why he's created a somewhat fra I suppose it's natural that a writer as sceptical of state power as Ales Kot keeps being drawn to writing secret agents; they're what that power looks like when the lights are off and the need to put on a nice front is removed. But whereas his own creations such as Zero can really dig into that, it leaves him in a more awkward position when he's playing with someone else's toy such as Agent Coulson or, here, the exemplar of the species. And perhaps that tension is why he's created a somewhat fractured story, six one-issue looks at Bond with a vague thematic link, but which show very different sides of him. The variety, verging at times on a sense of disjointedness, is emphasised by using different artists, some of whom handle the gig much better than others. The first chapter, 'The Body', has Casalanguida, one of the stand-out Dynamite Bond artists, who captures the appopriate air of elegant menace; this is the traditional, heroic Bond, preventing an assassination in spectacular style (though the explosions and helicopters remain off-panel, the comic instead showing us the prelude and the aftermath, the important stuff often overwhelmed by pyrotechnics). But that's followed by 'The Brain', essentially an interrogation scene, which means a lot of repeated panels of Bond in the same pose. Some artists can carry that off; Antonio Fuso just makes Bond look wet, a bit confused - almost Daniel Craig-esque - and as if a stock picture has been repeated with comic intent. Not that the story is otherwise funny, as Bond sits getting harangued about the horrors of Britain's past (Kot's occasional tendency to regurgitate his research undigested is in full effect here) by a scientist accused of giving terrorists access to bioweapons. The third issue, drawn by Rapha Lobosco, looks almost like Goran Parlov; it ends with a fabulous, knowingly homoerotic money shot as Bond goes undercover in a neo-Nazi sauna. This feels to some extent like the synthesis of the first issue's trad heroic Bond and the second's foolish catspaw, but if you attain that harmony halfway through the collection, where do you go next? Well, it turns out the short stories may be more linked than they first appeared, and the second half feels much more consistent, both in tone and in the quality of the art - though there's still a massive and appropriate variation between Eoin Marron's low-key vignette The Heart and Hayden Sherman's tense, intricately designed work on The Lungs. And then it's back to Casalanguida again as Bond and Leiter go for a drink and the main action is again resolved offscreen. Not without its flaws, but still definitely the most interesting Bond I've seen in any medium since Tomorrow Never Dies. I'm just disappointed that, given both Kot and the Bond franchise have a bit of form for on-the-nose names, he didn't manage to include a Bond girl called Patriarchy Kristeva or something. (Netgalley ARC)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    What a ride. Kot is a great choice for writing the acerbic and disgruntled Bond, especially since he seems to have free reign in this series. The tone jumps with each issue, going from somber to funny to heartbreaking and then back again. Ales manages to deliver more quotable lines in 6 issues than Diggle did in 12. Definitely up there with Ellis among the Bond comics.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Comics Alternative

    http://comicsalternative.com/episode-...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com

    For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com James Bond: The Body by Aleš Kot (illustrated by Luca Casalanguida, Rapha Lobosco, Valentina Pinto, Tom Napolitano and Eoin Marron) finds secret agent 007 recounting how he got each cut and bruise on his last mission. This graphic novel collects the six issues which make up The Body story-line. Issue #1: The Body – James Bond tells the story of his previous mission to a medical examiner. Each bruise and bump has a connecti For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com James Bond: The Body by Aleš Kot (illustrated by Luca Casalanguida, Rapha Lobosco, Valentina Pinto, Tom Napolitano and Eoin Marron) finds secret agent 007 recounting how he got each cut and bruise on his last mission. This graphic novel collects the six issues which make up The Body story-line. Issue #1: The Body – James Bond tells the story of his previous mission to a medical examiner. Each bruise and bump has a connection and a purpose – either to kill or to save a life. Issue #2: The Brain – In this issue Bond interrogates a scientist who let a terrorist organization steal a lethal virus. Issue #3: The Gut– To find the virus, Bond has to infiltrate a group of Neo-Nazis who intend on selling the weapon. Issue #4: The Heart – Bond finds himself without weapons, and wounded, in the Highlands. A woman who chose a solitary life helps him heal and Bond finds that he likes the peaceful place. Issue #5: The Lungs – The story now comes together in a terror attack – maybe! Issue #6: The Burial – James Bond meets his old friend and CIA counterpart Felix Leiter in a pub where the secret agent must face the consequences of his actions. I started reading this graphic novel thinking this would be another secret agent on a mission story but instead I got an excellent James Bond arc. James Bond: The Body by Aleš Kot (illustrated by Luca Casalanguida, Rapha Lobosco, Valentina Pinto, Tom Napolitano and Eoin Marron) is something different and deeper than the previous graphic novels. The story is clear and concise, there is no outrageous plot to take over the world, and there are no beautiful women to save (or kill when they eventually backstab Bond). This story is grounded and fresh, the comics work together to bring a cohesive story to life. The writer shows how Bond struggles with the decisions he makes and the actions he takes. He knows he will pay for bad decisions his superiors make, yet he executes his mission faithfully. Bond also sees another side of life, one that doesn’t have people who want to kill you behind every corner, and that tranquility might actually work for him at some point. The audience certainly gets the feeling that Bond is tired, mentally and physically broken from the world he lives in. This arc is a change of pace for the series, and goes in its own direction. The art in this graphic novel is a mixed bag, the story is really good but the backdrops seem to be boring (a sauna, house, pub) which is exactly the time for the artist to shine.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    For Queen and Country I like Bond. Gritty spy thriller Ian Fleming Bond. Early movie Bond. Even sometimes maybe later movie Bond when it was all gadgets and parkour. But it seems to me, especially lately, that some of the most interesting Bond is to be found in graphic novels. And this one is especially interesting, if untraditional. Bond has always been a bit tormented and repressed, but this is full blown angsty existential crisis Bond; he's still apparently calm and in control, but he's also no For Queen and Country I like Bond. Gritty spy thriller Ian Fleming Bond. Early movie Bond. Even sometimes maybe later movie Bond when it was all gadgets and parkour. But it seems to me, especially lately, that some of the most interesting Bond is to be found in graphic novels. And this one is especially interesting, if untraditional. Bond has always been a bit tormented and repressed, but this is full blown angsty existential crisis Bond; he's still apparently calm and in control, but he's also now been shaken, if not stirred. The amazing thing to me is not that we've gone in this direction, but that in this novel the approach is handled so well. This volume collects the first six issues of the Bond "Body" arc. They are thematically joined in that each issue flirts with a different aspect of the body - brain, heart, nerves, etc. (MILD SPOILER). The actual stories seem to be standalones. Until the end, that is, when they all interconnect and lead the reader to a satisfying, if dark, conclusion. I don't know where you stand, but I'm generally left unimpressed by talky, deep comics. Especially action or fantasy comics. They can be single minded, heavy handed, and awkwardly written. And boring. Not so here. The volume does start out a bit slowly and the reader does wonder if this is going to be some repetitive angst-fest or an anti-authoritarian wallow. But by approaching Bond from different angles we get different versions of his doubts and fears and we get different sorts of monologues and dialogues and different ways of thinking about who Bond is and what he represents. This skipping around and the overall thoughtfulness of the approach actually keep the reader interested and invested. The upshot for me was that this was a real, satisfying, and engaging surprise, and a refreshing new look at Bond, James Bond. A nice find. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… I thought I was going to get more out of this book – but then I started without knowing it was designed to look like six short stories. The end result is sort of six short stories – and kind of not, and either way there are problems. You have to take the comment that the first part is relevant with a pinch of salt, and while the tale meanders through its distinctive parts, you get too much that is a beat away from the full rhythm. So the conclusion of the bit with the woman is stupid ("oh Hmmm… I thought I was going to get more out of this book – but then I started without knowing it was designed to look like six short stories. The end result is sort of six short stories – and kind of not, and either way there are problems. You have to take the comment that the first part is relevant with a pinch of salt, and while the tale meanders through its distinctive parts, you get too much that is a beat away from the full rhythm. So the conclusion of the bit with the woman is stupid ("oh by the way, I'm only here to prove a woman can spend the night with you with her knickers on" she might as well have said), the bit where he goes full-on Punisher is stupid, and I could also have done with the snide comments about Brexit, too. Stupid. But at the same time, by the time everything is wrapped up, it's proven itself to be OK. It's one of those books where you think it's being lame, but have to give it the benefit of the doubt. It's more interesting than entertaining, as a result, giving us more character than action – so I'd say try it, but don't rush to buy, unless you feel compelled to for completism's sake.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Roopkumar Balachandran

    Like to thank Net galley giving me an opportunity to read and review this graphic Bond novel. A different take on James Bond, an action adventure in terms of Bond's body, brain, gut, heart, lungs and final chapter titled burial. Though each story looks unconnected but in the final chapter all the episodes are inter-connected. Ales Kot (I don't know how to pronounce) is the author and have five illustrators for six plots. I liked the illustrations of Luca Casalanguida. I liked the issue #2 and #4, Like to thank Net galley giving me an opportunity to read and review this graphic Bond novel. A different take on James Bond, an action adventure in terms of Bond's body, brain, gut, heart, lungs and final chapter titled burial. Though each story looks unconnected but in the final chapter all the episodes are inter-connected. Ales Kot (I don't know how to pronounce) is the author and have five illustrators for six plots. I liked the illustrations of Luca Casalanguida. I liked the issue #2 and #4, second issue, Bond interrogating a woman who had plans of killing the innocent people by lethal virus and issue four, without a weapon and badly wounded Bond meets a girl a writer in a solitary place. A must comic collection for Bond fans. Full review with images. http://www.chromaring.com/2018/12/jam...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Garrison

    Fragmented stories that focus on the psyche and inner workings of Bond. Somewhat connect together in the last issue, but the arc as a whole is certainly more therapy insights than plot-driven storylines. Much of the series takes place in the calm before the storm or recovery discussions between Bond and other characters. Kot does a great job at addressing current events as they might impact Bond/spies, but some of it is certainly heavy-handed. Of the 7 or so arcs of Dynamite’s Bond series, this Fragmented stories that focus on the psyche and inner workings of Bond. Somewhat connect together in the last issue, but the arc as a whole is certainly more therapy insights than plot-driven storylines. Much of the series takes place in the calm before the storm or recovery discussions between Bond and other characters. Kot does a great job at addressing current events as they might impact Bond/spies, but some of it is certainly heavy-handed. Of the 7 or so arcs of Dynamite’s Bond series, this is middle of the pack in writing and slightly below that in art. Review copy courtesy of NetGalley and Dynamite Comics.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    six separate stories that revolve around the toll being James Bond takes on his body. The Body, The Brain, The Gut, The Heart, The Lungs, and The Burial, each with a different artists but all scripted by Kot as Bond stops an assassination, interrogates a subject, infiltrates a neo-nazi arms ring, recovers from an assassination attempt in a remote location, stops a potential bio-terror attack, and meets Felix Leiter for a couple of drinks at a London Pub where more is happening than meets the eye six separate stories that revolve around the toll being James Bond takes on his body. The Body, The Brain, The Gut, The Heart, The Lungs, and The Burial, each with a different artists but all scripted by Kot as Bond stops an assassination, interrogates a subject, infiltrates a neo-nazi arms ring, recovers from an assassination attempt in a remote location, stops a potential bio-terror attack, and meets Felix Leiter for a couple of drinks at a London Pub where more is happening than meets the eye. Dynamite continues to provide entertaining Bond stories with a Fleming feel set in the current world.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bradford Deluca

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I did not enjoy this series. Bond’s actions, for the most part, are not Bond at all. Since when does Bond mow down a dozen defenseless people (even if they are bad guys)? Bond doesn’t take pleasure in killing and that’s what annoys me most. I didn’t feel many of these stories were all that connected either. He takes a bomb to the bottom of the river in #5 and he shows up at a bar in #6 and we’re told off-screen it was a dud bomb? What happened in between? I’be really enjoyed the Dynamite series I did not enjoy this series. Bond’s actions, for the most part, are not Bond at all. Since when does Bond mow down a dozen defenseless people (even if they are bad guys)? Bond doesn’t take pleasure in killing and that’s what annoys me most. I didn’t feel many of these stories were all that connected either. He takes a bomb to the bottom of the river in #5 and he shows up at a bar in #6 and we’re told off-screen it was a dud bomb? What happened in between? I’be really enjoyed the Dynamite series but this was the weakest by far.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kori

    This was a very boring read and I found myself wishing I was over it. The only scene that was my favorite was when he killed all of the Nazi's. The art work was badly done as well, a lot of the time I couldn't tell the tone of the story due to the characters having no emotion on their face. Not sure if the stories connect fully because it seemed kind of all over the place. I received a copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    James Bond: The Body by Aleš Kot et. al. is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in late October. Bond going over and confessing the cause of his injuries, wound by wound, to his doctor, then fighting bio-warfare terrorists and neo-Nazis, and coming to terms with being a spy (particularly not having a ‘normal’ life or to be able to pursue love or justice in a smaller, less earth-shattering way).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    Exactly the kind of tired, bitter, traumatic, anti-Imperialist stuff the Bond movies will never be. This doesn't have the subtlety or thematic weight of, say, the Bourne movie trilogy - my favourite of this severely limited genre - but it's still essentially exactly the kind of Bond story I wanted. What happens when the tool questions its function?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Barnes

    Lots of action, but no depth. Full review: https://mb-bookreviews.blogspot.com/2...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    The Body is Book 7 in the James Bond series comprising four stories. The first story opens with Bond’s doctor giving him a medical exam. He asks Bond how he sustained his injuries. Told in four separate issues, Bond goes on to explain what happened during his missions including an assassination attempt, a deadly virus, and his encounter with Neo-Nazi gangs. Gorgeous artwork which complemented the story well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Peck

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karthik M

  25. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Joseph

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    We have not read many James Bond graphic novels with Ian Flemming and they really are very realistic, well drawn, and very adventurous. The color choice, dialogue and action shots were breathtaking to look at and are sure to please all readers. Thank you Edelweiss and Diamond Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. This title will definitely be considered for our graphic novel collection. That is why we give this book 5 stars!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Athina Semertzaki

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

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