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MARVELS (ShoPro Books - Marvel Comics) Manga

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MARVELS (ShoPro Books - Marvel Comics) Manga. Japanese Titles: マーベルズ (ShoPro Books)


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MARVELS (ShoPro Books - Marvel Comics) Manga. Japanese Titles: マーベルズ (ShoPro Books)

30 review for MARVELS (ShoPro Books - Marvel Comics) Manga

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Marvelous reading!!! This TPB edition collects “Marvels” #0-4, plus commentary section by the involved people even an introduction by Stan Lee, also an artwork section. Creative Team: Writer: Kurt Busiek Illustrator: Alex Ross A TIME(LY) WHEN MARVEL YET TO PROPERLY BORN Maybe you have seen material mentioning the 75 years of Marvel, and technically that’s true, but it’s a fact that the company was called “Timely Comics”, and while it’s the same company, it’s obvious that in the 40’s, they were sti Marvelous reading!!! This TPB edition collects “Marvels” #0-4, plus commentary section by the involved people even an introduction by Stan Lee, also an artwork section. Creative Team: Writer: Kurt Busiek Illustrator: Alex Ross A TIME(LY) WHEN MARVEL YET TO PROPERLY BORN Maybe you have seen material mentioning the 75 years of Marvel, and technically that’s true, but it’s a fact that the company was called “Timely Comics”, and while it’s the same company, it’s obvious that in the 40’s, they were still decades away of its “boom” when Stan Lee (a young assistant in Timely era) started to create his popular characters. To be fair, and totally unbiased (since I read comics from all houses: DC, Marvel and the Indy ones (I don’t believe in limit myself)), DC Comics also has its blurry era to say that they have 75 years of existence, since when it was created Superman and Batman, it was still two separate companies: National Comics and All-American Comics, in fact, Batman was a result to compete in sales against Superman, and once united under the seal of DC Comics, it has continuously buying other comic book companies, like Fawcett, Charlton, Wildstorm, etc… adding their characters to the DC roster. So, Timely Comics was a brave beginning where they triumphed with the “Big Three” of that era: Captain America, Namor the Sub-Mariner and The Human Torch (the original one), and this very book, Marvels is firstly, a tribute to the origins of comics, where it presented in a marvelous way that said “big three”, but also other Timely characters like Millie the Model and Ka-Zar the Great, but even you can glimpse cameos of Superman, Clark Kent and Lois Lane, if you know where to look (not to mention The Watchmen in the following development of the story). Marvels is told from the point of view of Phil Sheldon, a character invented for this tale and where he is a photojournalist and through his camera you’ll watch in a new light the great events that made Marvel what is, and where the human being met a new kind of species with powers and abilities far beyond of those mortal men, questioning what this new rising kind means to the former inhabitants of the planet. MARVELOUS NEW ERA After the first chapter of the story dedicated to the “Timely years”, the other three chapters are focused in what known properly as the “Marvel years” where Stan Lee began his excelsior era basically creating the foundations of what is Marvel, with The Fantastic Four, The Avengers, The X-Men, Spider-Man (with all the support characters on each title), but also the creations of other talented people that contributed to the success of Marvel like Luke Cage between other ones. Phil Sheldon is our leading tour guide, where you’ll have a front seat (but still in the observer area) in the major events of the rising of Marvel Comics, starting (in the first chapter) with the battle of Namor vs. The Human Torch, and proceeding to The Wedding of Reed Richards and Susan Storm, The Trial of Galactus, the Mutant Revolution, the Kree-Skrull War, and of course… …the Day when Gwen Stacy died… …properly ending the “Silver Age” of Marvel, introducing it to a yet even more mature era of storytelling.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Photographer Phil Sheldon experiences what it's like to live in a world of super heroes, from the rise of the Human Torch in the late thirties all the way to the dawn of the mutants, the first appearance of Galactus, and the death of Gwen Stacy. When Marvels first hit scene, I was a wee lad of 17. The internet was in its infancy and comic shops were dying by the dozen. As it became easier to come by comics, or "graphic novels" if you're too cool to read comics, I always had a mind to read this bu Photographer Phil Sheldon experiences what it's like to live in a world of super heroes, from the rise of the Human Torch in the late thirties all the way to the dawn of the mutants, the first appearance of Galactus, and the death of Gwen Stacy. When Marvels first hit scene, I was a wee lad of 17. The internet was in its infancy and comic shops were dying by the dozen. As it became easier to come by comics, or "graphic novels" if you're too cool to read comics, I always had a mind to read this but didn't pick it up until recently. Maybe it was just nearly twenty years of expectations but I wasn't wowed by this. Sure, the premise is cool and Alex Ross is still Alex Ross but not a hell of a lot happens. Busiek's writing has never done much for me and this is no exception. I think Busiek should send Alex Ross a fruit basket or something every week considering this is the book that moved Busiek on to bigger and better things. Don't get me wrong, I like Phil Sheldon's odyssey through the Marvel universe from an everyman's point of view. It's cool seeing what he thinks about things and how his life unfolds alongside superheroes fighting in the streets and sky of New York for decades. A brief sidebar, if I may. One thing that always bugged me about the Marvel Universe is how the mutants are continuously feared and/or shat upon but the regular superheroes are idolized for the most part. Really? Is it more likely that the X-Men are going to destroy your house during a battle than the Avengers? Is a mutant more dangerous than someone like the Spider-Man? Anyway, back to the show. Maybe my less than stellar reaction to this book is due to almost 20 years of speculation on my part. I kept thinking, when is stuff going to happen? I feel like Alex Ross's artwork was wasted and should have been used on a story with more action, more like Kingdom Come, which I rated higher than this but probably won't hold up well under a re-read. So yeah. Marvels. Fantastic art, kind of a meh story for me. It may have been a case of wrong book, wrong time. Your mileage may vary.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    Treasure of the Rubbermaids 17: Marvel At Marvel’s Marvelous ‘Marvels’! The on-going discoveries of priceless books and comics found in a stack of Rubbermaid containers previously stored and forgotten at my parent’s house and untouched for almost 20 years. Thanks to my father dumping them back on me, I now spend my spare time unearthing lost treasures from their plastic depths. I would hate to be a New Yorker in the Marvel universe because it seems like the city is constantly being threatened by s Treasure of the Rubbermaids 17: Marvel At Marvel’s Marvelous ‘Marvels’! The on-going discoveries of priceless books and comics found in a stack of Rubbermaid containers previously stored and forgotten at my parent’s house and untouched for almost 20 years. Thanks to my father dumping them back on me, I now spend my spare time unearthing lost treasures from their plastic depths. I would hate to be a New Yorker in the Marvel universe because it seems like the city is constantly being threatened by super villains, invaded by aliens, flooded by pissed of Atlanteans or beset by some other form of comic book mayhem. I’ll bet it’s impossible to get property insurance at all. Comic book readers get a ring side seat and full explanations for everything that’s happening, but what would your average man on the street think about all this insanity? That’s what Marvels explores beautifully. Phil Sheldon is a young newspaper photographer during the Great Depression who witnesses the public unveiling of the original Human Torch followed shortly after by the appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner. Like most people, Sheldon is initially shocked and disturbed by these new super beings he thinks of as Marvels who routinely turn New York into a battleground. With the coming of WWII and the introduction of Captain America, Phil embraces the costumed heroes who fight the Nazis. Years later in the early ‘60s, an explosion of superheroes creates an odd mix of emotions in Phil and the general public. The Fantastic Four and The Avengers are celebrities who get put on magazine covers while some don’t know whether Spider-Man is a good guy or a criminal, and the mutant X-Men are feared and persecuted. Phil’s work as a photojournalist puts him in the middle of almost every big event Marvel did during the Silver Age, and he frequently finds himself conflicted about how he feels about them. This does a great job of exploring that idea of how the public responds to larger than life characters and events that make them feel scared and insignificant, and one of the things I’ve always liked about Marvel’s comics is how they've always portrayed the public's attitudes towards the superheroes as being full of contradictions. People cheer the heroes like Iron Man and Captain America, but some blame them for the fights that cause so much destruction. The mutants are the target of hatred and bigotry while stores sell clothing lines based on the many costumes of Wasp. New Yorkers will cheer on the Fantastic Four as they battle Galactus to save the entire world, but just days later their landlord will try to evict them from the Baxter Building for the danger they attract. Phil’s a great character to use in the midst of this because he’s a decent, ordinary guy who is still fully capable of giving into his worst instincts at times. He makes a career out of documenting the craziness that comes with the superheroes and thinks deeply about what the heroes mean to all of them. At times he almost worships them but can easily swing to resentment and jealously. Phil’s attitude towards them mirror how the superheroes have always been portrayed with a mixture of admiration and fear in the Marvel comics. The stunning artwork has a retro realism to it that really makes you feel like you’re looking at people wearing tights in the 1960s, yet still conveys all the wonder of seeing someone otherworldly like the Silver Surfer. By showing us how one regular person reacted to some of Marvel’s greatest hits, this moving tribute to the past gives a fresh perspective on how fans relate to the characters in these wild and amazing stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I just read Ed Brubaker's Marvels Project and liked that a bit better, but it may just be a matter of taste. I like Brubaker's and Steve Epting's earthier noir approach versus the glossier, more dramatic work of Busier and Ross. But I gave both 4 stars. They both take a kind of unique wide angle, meta and historical approach to the history and purpose of comics; both are approaches to the inception of the Golden Age of superheroes in the late thirties, as WWII loomed (for the US). We see the lov I just read Ed Brubaker's Marvels Project and liked that a bit better, but it may just be a matter of taste. I like Brubaker's and Steve Epting's earthier noir approach versus the glossier, more dramatic work of Busier and Ross. But I gave both 4 stars. They both take a kind of unique wide angle, meta and historical approach to the history and purpose of comics; both are approaches to the inception of the Golden Age of superheroes in the late thirties, as WWII loomed (for the US). We see the love of comics at least in the US in both volumes as in part driven by our interest in fighting Evil, and with a sense of optimism about doing so in the waning of the Depression. Everything seems possible. We can unite with them under FDR's leadership with the Allies to defeat a common enemy. Both humanize the comics, putting it in the context of regular folks, helping us see things from the angle of the Everyman that encountered them suddenly everywhere. Marvels looks at heroes and villains with a more contemporary feel, with moral ambiguity about what they positively and negatively might do with their powers. It's dangerous having all these superheroes flying around! Busiek takes the approach specifically of telling the story through photographer Phil Sheldon. He's even hurt by one of them in the process, but keeps on snapping. We get to meet many of them, too, one by one. The point is ALL of them, just rolling out many of them versus a focus on one superhero and his story. And Sheldon does the meta-fictional thing of publishing a book of photographs of superheroes called Marvels. There are Ross pages with dramatic swooping inspiring superhero feats alternating with the corresponding intimacy of the awe and worries of the Common Man. Over all, I would say with Brubaker's volume they are indispensable comics works, and I am glad I have finally read them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    In my view Marvels is one of, if not the greatest, comics released by Marvel Comics. I first encountered it as a twelve year old and have read it several times since. And each time I encounter again what it is that makes Marvels a stand out work in the Marvel universe of comics. The artwork in Marvels is clearly a stand-out feature. Though Alex Ross is better known for his work in the also grand Kingdom Come I personally prefer his artwork here where he first worked his unique stylistic magic. In In my view Marvels is one of, if not the greatest, comics released by Marvel Comics. I first encountered it as a twelve year old and have read it several times since. And each time I encounter again what it is that makes Marvels a stand out work in the Marvel universe of comics. The artwork in Marvels is clearly a stand-out feature. Though Alex Ross is better known for his work in the also grand Kingdom Come I personally prefer his artwork here where he first worked his unique stylistic magic. In my eyes Marvels has some of the greatest illustrations in the genre. While Watchmen and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns may be the greatest acclaimed graphic novels, I believe that alongside Batman: Noel this novel has the greatest artwork style. The story is essentially a trip through Marvel comic history, beginning with the WW2 based heroes and moving forward to the space-age/cosmic heroes. This trip is seen from the Odyssean perspective of one man by the name of Phil Sheldon. Phil is a photographer who through the course of the novel takes advantage of the rise of superheroes to gain work experiences. Through his eyes the reader sees how the world is changing with the rise of the superhero and the prejudice as regards the mutant X-Men. As an aspect of this comic history the reader can see the interconnected nature of the comics. I believe this shows better than any Marvel comic how connected the story arcs are. And in this way it makes the perfect entry novel into the Marvel universe. It also makes for the perfect novel to see a progression of human reactions to the heroes across the different entire continuing arcs. Part of the joy and brilliance of this graphic novel is how it also shows how individuals respond to the heroic and to the extraordinary. There is the sense that there are those vigilante style heroes - the Spiderman characters - who are disliked, because, despite being the heroes with power and responsibility, they are the heroes who make the right calls. There are the heroes like The Avengers, the public heroes which are loved and adored by many until they make an error or leave an unforgiving public to their fate. Then there are the X-Men, those unloved figures seeking desperately to be accepted and working behind the scenes as heroes. And then of course for every hero you have a villain, the individual who chooses to use their abilities for other purposes. The book essentially could be seen as filled with metaphors for the changes in history after WW2. For instance the rise of the nuclear powered heroes, or heroes who gained powers from nuclear power, are representative of the advent of the Cold War, where the racism directed against the X-Men reminds one of the periods of racism throughout recent history. In such a way though Marvels is a beautiful romp through a world imbued with super-heroics it is also a tribute to our own history and a reminder through the eyes of the everyman of how we as people adapt to the changing times. In short this is a poignant book full of superheroes and also with a deeper look into how the ordinary individual must survive in a world where men and women can tear down buildings with ease. Or to put it in other words, how men and women survive in an era of gods and mortals, an era of politics and advanced technology. It is the story of the 'marvels' but it is also the story of the ordinary people caught in the crossfire of the miraculous and therefore the deadly. And I personally know of few other comics (perhaps Watchmen or The Dark Knight Returns in some sense do this) that take a look into how people are affected by the extraordinary. As such I rate this as an important, must read, graphic novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    It took me a bit to warm up to this one but by the end I had come around. Obviously great art and a very good story. I know they shared the artist but I felt like this had a Marvel's version of Kingdom Come feel (though I know this came first so maybe Kingdom Come was DC's version of this).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    A very bland book story-wise that is only saved by Alex Ross and his beautiful painted artwork. It's basically a condensed history of the Marvel universe shown from the perspective of the regular people. As a result, we don't really see any of the superheroes doing anything heroic, and the regular folks' perspective doesn't bring anything interesting to the table by itself. If anything, it makes it even more obvious how arbitrarily and illogically hate is distributed among the superheroes in the A very bland book story-wise that is only saved by Alex Ross and his beautiful painted artwork. It's basically a condensed history of the Marvel universe shown from the perspective of the regular people. As a result, we don't really see any of the superheroes doing anything heroic, and the regular folks' perspective doesn't bring anything interesting to the table by itself. If anything, it makes it even more obvious how arbitrarily and illogically hate is distributed among the superheroes in the Marvel universe. People hate the X-Men because... why, exactly? Why don't they hate Captain America the same way? Why do people despise Spider-Man but not the Fantastic Four, love The Wasp and can't stand Iron Man (apparently)? The book clumsily raises those questions but doesn't have a clear answer. I'm not sure what kind of message Busiek was aiming for here, but I missed it. That Alex Ross art, though... Every time he gets to do a splash page or a double spread, it's phenomenal. This is the book's main strength, and if it was just that — a retelling of Marvel universe history illustrated exclusively by large format Alex Ross paintings, it would have been infinitely better. This could have been the definitive go-to comic for new Marvel readers, showing everything they need to know about the universe. As it is, though, the tacked-on story of Phil Sheldon the photographer is soulless, pointless and entirely forgettable, and that's a real shame.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross’ Marvels is their love letter to the superheroes of the Golden Age and Silver Age of Marvel Comics. Theirs is a tale that examines the Marvel universe through the eye of an everyman character, Phil Sheldon. Like his fellow unpowered denizens, he and his family have to live through every invasion, super-villain attack and the coming of Galactus fearing that each crisis would bring about the end of their world. The story brought it acclaim and the theme explored in several Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross’ Marvels is their love letter to the superheroes of the Golden Age and Silver Age of Marvel Comics. Theirs is a tale that examines the Marvel universe through the eye of an everyman character, Phil Sheldon. Like his fellow unpowered denizens, he and his family have to live through every invasion, super-villain attack and the coming of Galactus fearing that each crisis would bring about the end of their world. The story brought it acclaim and the theme explored in several other books featuring painted art. But it is Alex Ross’ art that would be the true reason this work stands out. Each cover and page is lovingly painted in the photorealistic style that becomes Ross’ trademark. It is not traced, or done by light box, but every line is rendered by freehand. Every detail is in there, rendered by a key eye who certainly knows his comics. Some of its panels are even recreated from key moments in Marvel comics. It is a joy to read, or even just to scan the beautiful art. Every comics fan should a copy of this masterpiece. Even if you don’t appreciate comics, this is a book that will improve your opinion of comics, as this a product of high production values and a keen eye for detail.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I've read Marvels more times than I can possibly count. Thousands of other people have written glowing reviews so much better than I ever could. Let me just say that I love this book, I always have. The experience of reading it is always magical for me, completely enthralling. And the art, that makes it all feel so real while I'm reading it... This goes very high on my list of all-time favorite comics.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kayıp Rıhtım

    Süper kahramanların gerçek olduğu bir dünyada sıradan bir insan olmanın nasıl olacağını hiç düşündünüz mü? Bahsettiğim şey, mesela yarın, birdenbire şehrinizde süper kahramanlar belirseydi ne hissederdiniz? Tüm o patlamalar, yıkılan binalar sizin yaşadığınız şehrin göbeğinde olsaydı? Marvels, yani Mucizeler işte süper kahramanlar dünyasına bu şekilde yaklaşıyor. Bir süper kahraman çizgi romanı olsa da, olayı kahramanların gözünden değil, sıradan bir haber fotoğrafçısının gözünden anlatıyor. “Muciz Süper kahramanların gerçek olduğu bir dünyada sıradan bir insan olmanın nasıl olacağını hiç düşündünüz mü? Bahsettiğim şey, mesela yarın, birdenbire şehrinizde süper kahramanlar belirseydi ne hissederdiniz? Tüm o patlamalar, yıkılan binalar sizin yaşadığınız şehrin göbeğinde olsaydı? Marvels, yani Mucizeler işte süper kahramanlar dünyasına bu şekilde yaklaşıyor. Bir süper kahraman çizgi romanı olsa da, olayı kahramanların gözünden değil, sıradan bir haber fotoğrafçısının gözünden anlatıyor. “Mucizeler”, çizgi romanımızın ana karakteri olan fotoğrafçı Phil Sheldon‘ın süper kahramanlara verdiği isim. Kitabımız, Phineas Horton‘ın ilk Human Torch‘u, yani Alev Adam ya da daha çok sevdiğim Türkçesiyle Canlı Meşale’yi yaratmasıyla başlıyor. Sentetik bir android olan ve havayla temas ettiği anda alev alan Human Torch’un tanıtıldığı basın toplantısının fotoğraflarını çeken Sheldon, toplantıdaki diğer basın mensuplarının aksine bu olaydan etkileniyor. Herkes bunun sıradan bir göz yanıltma gösterisi olduğunu düşünürken, Human Torch’un kıpırdadığı Sheldon’ın gözlerinden kaçmıyor ve olayın gerçek olduğunu anlıyor. Medyadan gördüğü tepkiler üzerine oğlu olarak gördüğü androidi beton kaplı bir odaya hapsedip gömmek zorunda kalan Horton, bir çeşit babalık içgüdüsüyle, androidin beynine dünyayla ilgili bilgiler aktarıyor. Beton çatlayınca da Human Torch tekrar hayat buluyor ve Mucizelerin doğuşu başlamış oluyor. Tam bu sıralarda, Namor Atlantis’ten çıkarak Manhattan’a geliyor ve bazen insanlara yardım ediyor, bazen onlarla savaşıyor. Zaten “süper” kavramına uzak olan insanlar, Human Torch ve Namor hakkında ne düşüneceklerini bilemiyorlar. İkisini bazen seviyor, bazense onlardan düşman gibi bahsediyorlar. Bu sırada ortaya çıkan Captain America ise, insanların “Mucizeler”e bakış açısını olumlu yönde epey etkiliyor. Sürekli yeni kahramanlar ortaya çıkıp sürekli olaylar olurken, sıradan insanların bu olaylara bakış açılarını görüyoruz hikayeler boyunca. İnsanlar kurtarıldıkları zaman kahramanları seviyor ve onları sahipleniyor, ama ertesi gün sanki hiçbir şey olmamış, hayatlarını onlar kurtarmamış gibi kahramanlardan nefret ediyorlar. Bunun altında yatan dürtünün ise korku olduğu sıklıkla gösteriliyor. Binlerce yıldır her şeyi kendileri başarmış ve zorlukların üstesinden gelmiş olan insanlar, Mucizelerin yanında sönük hatta aşağı kaldıkları için kendilerini kötü hissediyorlar ve Mucizlerin yapabileceklerinden korkuyorlar. Superman çizgi romanlarında da sıklıkla işlenen bu konu, Marvel evreninin tamamını içine alacak şekilde işleniyor. Neredeyse bütün Marvel kahramanlarını görmenin yanında, J. J. Jameson ve Ben Urich gibi pek çok yan ve “normal” karakteri de görüyoruz hikaye boyunca. Bir de Mutantlar ortaya çıkınca, işler içinden çıkılmaz bir hal alıyor. Zaten X-Men okuyanların bildiği “Mutant düşmanlığı” hadisesi, bu sefer Mutantların değil de insanların gözünden anlatılıyor. Hala okumadıysanız Marvels’ı şiddetle tavsiye ediyorum. Eğer okuduysanız, zaten bu cildin defalarca okunmayı hak ettiğini biliyorsunuzdur. - Türker BEŞE İncelemenin tamamı için: http://kayiprihtim.com/inceleme/marve...

  11. 4 out of 5

    George K.

    Το τσίμπησα χθες με λιγότερα από 9 ευρώ και δεν κρατήθηκα στιγμή, το ξεκίνησα αμέσως. Και πριν λίγο το τελείωσα και δηλώνω ενθουσιασμένος. Η αλήθεια είναι ότι έχω διαβάσει ελάχιστα έως καθόλου κόμικς της Μάρβελ και ό,τι ξέρω για το σύμπαν της είναι από τις διάφορες ταινίες. Καλώς ή κακώς. Όμως αυτό το γεγονός δεν με εμπόδισε από το να απολαύσω αυτό το εξαιρετικό έργο τέχνης, που αποτελεί ένα κόσμημα για κάθε λάτρη των υπερηρωικών κόμικς. Η ιστορία είναι πραγματικά πολύ ενδιαφέρουσα και ιδιαίτερα Το τσίμπησα χθες με λιγότερα από 9 ευρώ και δεν κρατήθηκα στιγμή, το ξεκίνησα αμέσως. Και πριν λίγο το τελείωσα και δηλώνω ενθουσιασμένος. Η αλήθεια είναι ότι έχω διαβάσει ελάχιστα έως καθόλου κόμικς της Μάρβελ και ό,τι ξέρω για το σύμπαν της είναι από τις διάφορες ταινίες. Καλώς ή κακώς. Όμως αυτό το γεγονός δεν με εμπόδισε από το να απολαύσω αυτό το εξαιρετικό έργο τέχνης, που αποτελεί ένα κόσμημα για κάθε λάτρη των υπερηρωικών κόμικς. Η ιστορία είναι πραγματικά πολύ ενδιαφέρουσα και ιδιαίτερα καλογραμμένη. Μου άρεσε αυτή η διαφορετική ματιά απέναντι στους υπερήρωες, μιας και βλέπουμε τους ίδιους και τις μάχες μεταξύ τους αλλά και με εχθρούς, από την πλευρά των απλών ανθρώπων, των πολιτών της Νέας Υόρκης. Πιο συγκεκριμένα, αφηγητής και κύριο πρόσωπο της ιστορίας είναι ο Φιλ Σέλντον, ένας φωτορεπόρτερ. Βλέπουμε πως η ύπαρξη αλλά και η δράση των υπερηρώων επηρεάζει την ζωή των ανθρώπων, που δεν μπορούν να κάνουν και πολλά πράγματα απέναντι τους. Οι άνθρωποι είναι, πλέον, απλοί θεατές. Οι υπερήρωες τους σώζουν από πολλές επικίνδυνες καταστάσεις, ποιες είναι, όμως, οι αντιδράσεις τους; Τους αγαπάνε, τους μισούν, τους ζηλεύουν; Όπως είπα, το σενάριο είναι άκρως ιντριγκαδόρικο και καλογραμμένο, με την πλοκή να κρατάει το ενδιαφέρον του αναγνώστη από την πρώτη μέχρι την τελευταία σελίδα, με την χορταστική δράση, την μπόλικη αγωνία και τους καλοσχηματισμένους χαρακτήρες. Όμως το σενάριο δεν θα ήταν τόσο καλό, αν δεν υποστηριζόταν από αυτό το τρομερό και εξαιρετικό σχέδιο. Τα λόγια είναι περιττά. Μιλάμε για μια τρομερή εικονογράφηση, με τα καρέ που μπορούν να κάνουν τον αναγνώστη να τα χαζεύει για κάμποση ώρα, να είναι πάρα πολλά. Αρκετές εικόνες είναι σαν πίνακες ζωγραφικής. Το vintage αισθητικής σχέδιο κατάφερε να με μεταφέρει πίσω στον χρόνο, σ'αυτό το παράλληλο σύμπαν. Αυτά τα ολίγα. Είναι σίγουρα από τα καλύτερα και πιο χορταστικά κόμικς που έχω διαβάσει, ανεξαρτήτου είδους. Ιστορία, σχέδιο, χρώματα, μηνύματα, όλα άψογα. Και το ευτύχημα είναι ότι η ελληνική έκδοση είναι, πραγματικά, πολύ όμορφη και προσεγμένη, με καλή μετάφραση, ωραίο χαρτί, στιβαρό δέσιμο και με σκληρό εξώφυλλο. Και, πλέον, μπορεί να το βρει κανείς στα ελληνικά σε εξευτελιστική τιμή για την ποιότητα και την ψυχαγωγία που προσφέρει.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    I had no real preconceptions going into this, so this knocked me out of my chair and into the milky pools of Alex Ross's paint. Man that was good. One of the most unique and, what's the word, atypical superhero comics probably ever written, by one Kurt Busiek. It strikes me as Watchmenesque in its examination of heroes and villains and their moral ambiguity, particularly in relation to civilians. There's a lot of action considering it only happens if Phil Sheldon is there snapping photographs, l I had no real preconceptions going into this, so this knocked me out of my chair and into the milky pools of Alex Ross's paint. Man that was good. One of the most unique and, what's the word, atypical superhero comics probably ever written, by one Kurt Busiek. It strikes me as Watchmenesque in its examination of heroes and villains and their moral ambiguity, particularly in relation to civilians. There's a lot of action considering it only happens if Phil Sheldon is there snapping photographs, like a story of negatives, what isn't there. There's even meta fiction here, as Phil Sheldon writes a book called Marvels that is essentially this book. My only criticism is the back and forth soap opera of the Marvels, as each character is at some point either fighting the Nazis for America or trying to destroy America, with little or no justification. But then again, that could be satire for the space opera nature of comic book events, how without provocation characters morally flip flop to suit that particular week's plotting. At any rate, downright amazing, or should I say Marvelous?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    A good read! So we have witnessed the birth of The Marvel Cinematic universe, from iron man 1 to Ant-man and still more to come, but what if these weren't movies, what if they were real, what if we really had super heroes protecting us? That what this book is, the birth of the marvel universe from the perspective of ordinary citizens! The concept was pretty interesting, as it realistically looks at how the world would react to heroes, in the 40s and 50s, they would be seen as icons, but soon aft A good read! So we have witnessed the birth of The Marvel Cinematic universe, from iron man 1 to Ant-man and still more to come, but what if these weren't movies, what if they were real, what if we really had super heroes protecting us? That what this book is, the birth of the marvel universe from the perspective of ordinary citizens! The concept was pretty interesting, as it realistically looks at how the world would react to heroes, in the 40s and 50s, they would be seen as icons, but soon after they would seen as villains, and then heroes again! The book also has ordinary people witness famous Marvel stories as they happen, such as The Avengers, Galactus, The Death of Gwen Stacy, all in all its a good story! Alex Ross's artwork is also very good, although its not his best. But overall this a great read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Doctorjimmy

    Διάβασε όλο το review εδώ Το θέμα με το οποίο καταπιάνεται το Marvels είναι ο φόβος προς το άγνωστο, το νέο και το ξένο. Σε τέσσερα τεύχη, το δίδυμο αναλύει την συμπεριφορά των ανθρώπων προς οτιδήποτε διαφορετικό και καταλήγει στο ότι, τελικά, οι άνθρωποι δεν ξέρουν τι θέλουν και τι πιστεύουν. Οι υπερήρωες για αυτούς είναι απλά σωτήρες χρήσιμοι μόνο σε ώρα ανάγκης, ενώ τον υπόλοιπο καιρό δεν είναι τίποτα περισσότερο από υλικό για εφήμερο κουτσομπολιό, εγκληματίες και επικίνδυνοι για τον κόσμο, με Διάβασε όλο το review εδώ Το θέμα με το οποίο καταπιάνεται το Marvels είναι ο φόβος προς το άγνωστο, το νέο και το ξένο. Σε τέσσερα τεύχη, το δίδυμο αναλύει την συμπεριφορά των ανθρώπων προς οτιδήποτε διαφορετικό και καταλήγει στο ότι, τελικά, οι άνθρωποι δεν ξέρουν τι θέλουν και τι πιστεύουν. Οι υπερήρωες για αυτούς είναι απλά σωτήρες χρήσιμοι μόνο σε ώρα ανάγκης, ενώ τον υπόλοιπο καιρό δεν είναι τίποτα περισσότερο από υλικό για εφήμερο κουτσομπολιό, εγκληματίες και επικίνδυνοι για τον κόσμο, με τα Μ.Μ.Ε. να επιδεινώνουν την κατάσταση για τα δικά τους συμφέροντα. Η συμπεριφορά αυτή φτάνει στο ζενίθ της στο τελευταίο τεύχος, στο οποίο οι πολίτες είναι τόσο σίγουροι -και πεπεισμένοι από τα μέσα- για το ότι ο Spider-Man είναι εγκληματίας που αρχίζουν τις ψευδείς καταθέσεις εναντίον του.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shalini Sinha

    What a brilliant storytelling and fantastic art! This was my first read of the origins of the Human Torch and I'm totally digging it. "The golden age of miracles would begin, and in the years to come, the world would know the presence of the unnatural and extraordinary as part of reality"" "Marvels" is a book completely from the perspective of New Yorkers who had been mute spectators ever since Avengers and X-Men, whom they collectively call Marvels, were building and breaking stuffs. It documents What a brilliant storytelling and fantastic art! This was my first read of the origins of the Human Torch and I'm totally digging it. "The golden age of miracles would begin, and in the years to come, the world would know the presence of the unnatural and extraordinary as part of reality"" "Marvels" is a book completely from the perspective of New Yorkers who had been mute spectators ever since Avengers and X-Men, whom they collectively call Marvels, were building and breaking stuffs. It documents the exploration into the motives of the fickle-minded public and reasons behind maligning the superheroes every now and then. "They save us and they save us and we insult and belittle them. We're just blind to the truth about them." Almost every series that runs sufficiently long has this one phase which is not always very well developed, for instance, the vol 5 of Ms Marvel - Super Famous. This series does an excellent job at building substantial background to a great many such events, New Yorkers' encounters with the Marvels and their always changing opinions of them... "The Eel, he was just a man in a suit, dangerous, sure. But the torch would stop him, would protect us. Who would protect us from the mutants?" ... through the main protagonist, Phil, who is a freelance photographer who documents the reactions of the spectators during the strifes with the enemies of their universe. The only downside of this book is that there are way too many events which don't provide sufficient room for background development of each event. It has covered almost everything from Torch vs Submariner fights to Stacy siblings's deaths. There is a lot of content which a non-regular reader can't keep up with. Still, it was a great entertaining read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I'm torn on this one...I really wanted to love it. I do admire all the research that went into this one, the referencing of classic Marvel stories and moments, the art, but... At the end of the book, I was left with a pretty 'oh that's all?' feeling. The art of Alex Ross is always something to behold, but here, I think it took away from things. I wasn't able to connect to a lot, and the main character is actually kind of un-likable. He ditches his fiancée because of the arrival of Sub-Mariner and I'm torn on this one...I really wanted to love it. I do admire all the research that went into this one, the referencing of classic Marvel stories and moments, the art, but... At the end of the book, I was left with a pretty 'oh that's all?' feeling. The art of Alex Ross is always something to behold, but here, I think it took away from things. I wasn't able to connect to a lot, and the main character is actually kind of un-likable. He ditches his fiancée because of the arrival of Sub-Mariner and Torch, only to ask her back after Captain America makes the 'Marvels' seem good. Then he hates Mutants, until his daughters shelter one in their basement, then he decides that maybe they're not so bad. He avoids his family, and even resents them for making him miss a story when they're out at the zoo together and something happens. I mean, do you really want to connect with a guy who's willing to walk away from his family (3 women no less) in the middle of a crisis because 'there's a story and photos to get'?? No, not so much. Here's the problem: He's enough of a boring character who flip-flops on his beliefs and then just gives up, so that you don't really enjoy the rest of the story. I can enjoy the crafting, the research and so forth, but the protagonist really takes away from what could have been a much better story. I mean no doubt, Stan Lee and John Romita liked it, but still. It's a curio, something you show people to look at something shiny, but there's not much substance; there's hardly even an interaction with any heroes, nor is there much insight into their lives. If Marvels was supposed to make us marvel, it does; at how utterly boring all the humans are, so no wonder they buy books and pictures about the Marvel-ous heroes and observe them as a respite from boredom and tedium. Disappointing. probably 2.5 stars really, because at some points it just seems like an excuse to let Alex Ross draw/paint every hero they can think of.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Koen

    Wauw, probably the best take on the Marvel heroes I've read so far ... from a completely different perspective, that's what makes it special .. and then the characterbuilding, that's what makes it amazing .. And then to top it off with such an amazing artwork .. Well, I must say: this was a stunning piece of artwork !

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Ever since Alan Moore’s 1982 dark, post-modern deconstructionist series of Miracleman – formerly known as Marvelman – he introduced the concept of how superheroes could exist and behave in “the real world”. However, being Alan Moore, his approach to superheroes has mostly been dark and cynical, though brilliant nonetheless. In the case of the four-issue comic Marvels from Astro City writer Kurt Busiek and legendary painter Alex Ross, this is an optimistic view of how our world interacts with our Ever since Alan Moore’s 1982 dark, post-modern deconstructionist series of Miracleman – formerly known as Marvelman – he introduced the concept of how superheroes could exist and behave in “the real world”. However, being Alan Moore, his approach to superheroes has mostly been dark and cynical, though brilliant nonetheless. In the case of the four-issue comic Marvels from Astro City writer Kurt Busiek and legendary painter Alex Ross, this is an optimistic view of how our world interacts with our favourite Marvel characters. Set from 1939 to 1974, the series examines the life and career of news photographer Phil Sheldon living and witnessing ordinary life in a world full of costumed supermen. Using the first thirty-five years of Marvel Comics’ history as well as retelling some of the most famous events from that period, the story is told through the perspective of an Everyman character that provides a unique voice to the way humanity can look at the “Marvels”. Busiek’s writing does a smart job at contrasting the existence of the Marvels with real-life politics, as best established in the second issue that introduces the X-Men and the mutant race in the mid-sixties, which leads to riots and manhunts based on racism and paranoia. As great an artist Alex Ross has always been, you can only hire him for certain projects and in the case of books like Marvels and later Kingdom Come, he shows how brilliant he is with his realistic, human depictions of classic comic book characters. If you are a hardcore Marvel fanatic, you will get a good kick out of Ross’ stunning recreations of classic Marvel moments. At the core of Marvels, is a truly moving human story with Phil Sheldon witnessing the extraordinary and yet it is the intimacy he experiences with his own kind where he learns the true beauty of the Marvels, whether it is his beloved family protecting a hunted mutant girl or the few conversations he has with Gwen Stacy before her terrible demise. If you want a story that is both heroic and human, go and read Marvels, you won’t be disappointed.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love, love, love the combination of Busiek and Ross. I had never bothered with this book before because I'm not usually a Marvel girl, and because I thought that it sounded like it covered the same territory as the excellent Astro City Vol. 1: Life in the Big City, just with known characters. Wrong. It looks at the Marvel characters and the Marvel universe through the lens of one photographer/observer, whose opinions change very realistically over time. The other clever conceit is that it look I love, love, love the combination of Busiek and Ross. I had never bothered with this book before because I'm not usually a Marvel girl, and because I thought that it sounded like it covered the same territory as the excellent Astro City Vol. 1: Life in the Big City, just with known characters. Wrong. It looks at the Marvel characters and the Marvel universe through the lens of one photographer/observer, whose opinions change very realistically over time. The other clever conceit is that it looks back at a slightly revised history while referencing adventures - and sometimes exact frames, I think - from the classic titles. There's a list of all of the stories it borrows from at the end, along with a little photo essay by Ross that would probably in itself be worth the price of the comic. Forget that shyster Thomas Kinkade; Alex Ross is the real painter of light. The combination of Ross's art with Busiek's intelligent takes on superheroes is always a potent combination.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alondra (Chibi)

    Ahora entiendo el por qué de la fama de este tomo. Me siento afortunada de tener este volumen tan maravilloso que cuenta con prólogos de Stan Lee y John Romita, pero después de esta lectura definitivamente me he transformado en una completa fan del trabajo de Alex Ross y Kurt Busiek. Malvels nos relata la historia de Phil Sheldon, un fotógrafo que trabaja para el periódico. Un personaje común y corriente, sin poderes. A través de sus ojos vemos los eventos más importantes de Marvel entre 1941 hast Ahora entiendo el por qué de la fama de este tomo. Me siento afortunada de tener este volumen tan maravilloso que cuenta con prólogos de Stan Lee y John Romita, pero después de esta lectura definitivamente me he transformado en una completa fan del trabajo de Alex Ross y Kurt Busiek. Malvels nos relata la historia de Phil Sheldon, un fotógrafo que trabaja para el periódico. Un personaje común y corriente, sin poderes. A través de sus ojos vemos los eventos más importantes de Marvel entre 1941 hasta 1993, si mis calculos no fallan. Definitivamente este es una de las historias de oro de Marvel, una historia que te atrapa desde el primer segundo y especialmente por el dibujo. Casi como estar viendo una película. Marvels nos muestra el otro lado del mundo de los súper héroes (o maravillas), nos muestra cómo lo vivieron las personas, cómo los veían. El final me dejó con ganas de más, pero admito que es un excelente cierre a la historia. Gracias Phil por tanto, yo también sufro por esa muerte. En fin, necesitan leer este número porque es maravillosamente maravilloso.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert Jazo

    When I was a kid, I was a complete Marvel Zombie (i.e., a person who only bought Marvel Comic books and nothing else). I even remember picking up The Killing Joke off of a spinner rack, flipping through it, and putting it back because I just couldn't bring myself to buy a DC book, even though it looked good. Over the years my tastes have shifted quite a bit. I actually collect very few Marvel comics nowadays. Still, because of my youthful obsession, I am have more nostalgia for Marvel Comics than When I was a kid, I was a complete Marvel Zombie (i.e., a person who only bought Marvel Comic books and nothing else). I even remember picking up The Killing Joke off of a spinner rack, flipping through it, and putting it back because I just couldn't bring myself to buy a DC book, even though it looked good. Over the years my tastes have shifted quite a bit. I actually collect very few Marvel comics nowadays. Still, because of my youthful obsession, I am have more nostalgia for Marvel Comics than most. In other words, Marvels was tailor made for me. Written by Kurt Busiek and illustrated by Alex Ross, Marvels looks back at the events of the Marvel Universe through the eyes of an average man, specifically photographer Phil Sheldon. Retelling old Marvel stories from the perspective of a man on the street gives these old stories a completely new and different feel. It helps that Kurt Busiek has an amazing knack for telling deeply personal stories against a four-color superhero backdrop, a talent he would later perfect in his Astro City series. Alex Ross' hyper-realistic art style is also perfect for this story. When Giant-Man steps over the anxious crowd during a battle, it looks every bit as awe-inspiring as you would imagine a 30' tall man would be in real life. The Human Torch really looks as terrifying as you would expect a man on fire to look. Yet, despite the sense of grandeur he imparts on his heroes, he shows you their little imperfections as well. If you look close enough, you can see the seams on Spider-Man's costume and the slight bulge on his wrists where his web-shooters are located. Honestly, I think Marvels and the similar Kingdom Come are some of Alex Ross' best work.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Marvels is by far the best Marvel work I have ever read. It tells the birth of an amazing universe through the eyes of a normal person, a cameraman journalist named Phil Sheldon. You'd be surprised on how realistic and grounded the story is under a world where superhumans and mutants exist. Kurt Busiek has done a mesmerizing job on carefully placing human emotions - awe, fear, ignorance and hatred effectively across the progression of the story. This is a graphic novel where great feats and epic Marvels is by far the best Marvel work I have ever read. It tells the birth of an amazing universe through the eyes of a normal person, a cameraman journalist named Phil Sheldon. You'd be surprised on how realistic and grounded the story is under a world where superhumans and mutants exist. Kurt Busiek has done a mesmerizing job on carefully placing human emotions - awe, fear, ignorance and hatred effectively across the progression of the story. This is a graphic novel where great feats and epic battles only give auxiliary aesthetics to the main thesis: what would we do when "they" come to this world? Though rich with Marvel gallery of heroes and villains, it doesn't feel convoluted. Bits and pieces of them are carefully scattered throughout the book, both on and off panels. Some can be seen longer than the others, like the Fantastic 4 but all of them do get an enough amount of screen time to be appreciated by readers. Marvels is a one of a kind story that has beautiful art (thanks Alex Ross!) and a heart of every normal person.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    A very different view of the world of supers. Marvel takes the common man's view of what the world looks like and how it changes with the arrival of superheroes. Great storyline and exceptional art. Very recommended

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vinton Bayne

    Re-reading for the Excelsior podcast. This book really holds up! I hadn't read it in over twenty years, but I still love it so much.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Val Sarmiento

    [2017] Por el momento sólo diré que las ilustraciones y la época son demasiado perfect0s en este cómic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ritinha

    Ímpar homenagem às golden, silver e bronze ages dos comics, escrita por gente com vasto conhecimento do cânone Marvel, materializada na superior e belíssima arte de Alex Ross.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Casandra

    3.5 stars This was different from what I expected, but I found it interesting enough. The art was outstanding and the premise was cool. It was fascinating to read from the POV of just an ordinary citizen and have their take on living in a world of superheroes. However, I just found that not a whole lot happens. Even though it was still enjoyable and kept me engaged enough to read until the end, I expected..... more. But yeah. Fanatisc art, okay writing, and that's all I really have to say.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matti Karjalainen

    En noin yleisesti ottaen perusta juurikaan supersankarisarjakuvista, mutta Kurt Busiekin käsikirjoittama ja Alex Rossin upeasti kuvittama "Marvels" (Egmont, 2001) on yksi säännön vahvistavista poikkeuksista. Se ilmestyi alun perin nelinumeroisena minisarjana vuonna 1994. Kiinnostavaksi sarjakuvan tekee se, että supersankareiden sijasta tapahtumia kuvataan newyorkilaisen valokuvaajan Phil Sheldonin näkökulmasta. Sheldon on siellä missä tapahtuu, osin työnsä vuoksi ja osin tahtomattaan. Liekin ja En noin yleisesti ottaen perusta juurikaan supersankarisarjakuvista, mutta Kurt Busiekin käsikirjoittama ja Alex Rossin upeasti kuvittama "Marvels" (Egmont, 2001) on yksi säännön vahvistavista poikkeuksista. Se ilmestyi alun perin nelinumeroisena minisarjana vuonna 1994. Kiinnostavaksi sarjakuvan tekee se, että supersankareiden sijasta tapahtumia kuvataan newyorkilaisen valokuvaajan Phil Sheldonin näkökulmasta. Sheldon on siellä missä tapahtuu, osin työnsä vuoksi ja osin tahtomattaan. Liekin ja Namorin ensimmäiset kohtaamiset, Kapteeni Amerikan urotyöt toisessa maailmansodassa, Ryhmä-X:n aikaansaamat mutanttivainot, Galaktuksen saapuminen ja Gwen Stacyn kuolema... Kyseessä on siis eräänlainen läpileikkaus Marvel-universumin historiaan aina vuoden 1939 ensimmäisistä seikkailuista 1970-luvulle saakka. Sarjakuvassa pohditaan kuinka supersankarien - tai ihmeiden, kuten heitä albumissa nimitetään - olemassaolo näyttäytyy tavallisen tallaajan arkipäivässä. Sankarit herättävät kaikessa ylivertaisuudessaan niin ihailua kuin pelkoa, suoranaista vihaakin. Lukija saanee enemmän irti albumista, mikäli hän hieman tuntee Marvel-universumin historiaa, mutta ihan hyvin tämmöinen maallikkokin mukana roikkui, vaikka ei ihan jokaista viittausta tunnistanutkaan.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Callie Rose Tyler

    I concede, all the hype surrounding this book is well deserved. These stories are re-tellings of historic Marvel events told through the eyes of the average person, specifically a free-lance photographer Phil Sheldon. The events and timeline are well-researched and the grace with which they are stringed together is seamless. The result is an emotional story with genuine gravitas and impact. Then you add in Alex Ross' amazing artwork and the end product elevates the entire medium. If you are looki I concede, all the hype surrounding this book is well deserved. These stories are re-tellings of historic Marvel events told through the eyes of the average person, specifically a free-lance photographer Phil Sheldon. The events and timeline are well-researched and the grace with which they are stringed together is seamless. The result is an emotional story with genuine gravitas and impact. Then you add in Alex Ross' amazing artwork and the end product elevates the entire medium. If you are looking for high action and lots of superhero face time you might be disappointed as the focus is more on the effect these heroes have on society. This is a must read for any comic fan! This collection is also full of bonuses from Stan Lee, Alex Ross, and others. These bonuses give the reader further insight, a deeper understanding and a more profound appreciation of the book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    Busiek takes a look at the superhero world of Marvel. The detailed art reflects the story well. He weaves together stories over decades to show how the world felt to an ordinary human character, a news photographer. He saw the first, with the Submariner and the original Human Torch, and Captain America. Later, he sees the Fantastic Four and the Avengers -- and the X-men. And Galactus. And Spiderman. He spends a lot of time pondering humans' reactions to them. Once he berates some complainers for Busiek takes a look at the superhero world of Marvel. The detailed art reflects the story well. He weaves together stories over decades to show how the world felt to an ordinary human character, a news photographer. He saw the first, with the Submariner and the original Human Torch, and Captain America. Later, he sees the Fantastic Four and the Avengers -- and the X-men. And Galactus. And Spiderman. He spends a lot of time pondering humans' reactions to them. Once he berates some complainers for their ingratitude, and another time, he catches Jonah off guard and hears him admit that he can't measure up to Spiderman. It doesn't quite resolve his story as well as I would like, but it's a fascinating look.

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