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Odd Is on Our Side

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When things get scary, it’s nice to know that Odd is on our side.   The one and only Odd Thomas is back—in his second edgy and enthralling graphic-novel adventure from #1 New York Times bestselling suspense master Dean Koontz. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California, and there’s a whiff of something wicked in the autumn air. While the town prepares for its annual festivities When things get scary, it’s nice to know that Odd is on our side.   The one and only Odd Thomas is back—in his second edgy and enthralling graphic-novel adventure from #1 New York Times bestselling suspense master Dean Koontz. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California, and there’s a whiff of something wicked in the autumn air. While the town prepares for its annual festivities, young fry cook Odd Thomas can’t shake the feeling that make-believe goblins and ghouls aren’t the only things on the prowl. And he should know, since he can see what others cannot: the spirits of the restless dead. But even his frequent visitor, the specter of Elvis Presley, can’t seem to point Odd in the right direction. With the help of his gun-toting girlfriend, Stormy, Odd is out to uncover the terrible truth. Is something sinister afoot in the remote barn guarded by devilish masked men? Has All Hallows Eve mischief taken a malevolent turn? Or is the pleading ghost of a trick-or-treater a frightening omen of doom?  


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When things get scary, it’s nice to know that Odd is on our side.   The one and only Odd Thomas is back—in his second edgy and enthralling graphic-novel adventure from #1 New York Times bestselling suspense master Dean Koontz. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California, and there’s a whiff of something wicked in the autumn air. While the town prepares for its annual festivities When things get scary, it’s nice to know that Odd is on our side.   The one and only Odd Thomas is back—in his second edgy and enthralling graphic-novel adventure from #1 New York Times bestselling suspense master Dean Koontz. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California, and there’s a whiff of something wicked in the autumn air. While the town prepares for its annual festivities, young fry cook Odd Thomas can’t shake the feeling that make-believe goblins and ghouls aren’t the only things on the prowl. And he should know, since he can see what others cannot: the spirits of the restless dead. But even his frequent visitor, the specter of Elvis Presley, can’t seem to point Odd in the right direction. With the help of his gun-toting girlfriend, Stormy, Odd is out to uncover the terrible truth. Is something sinister afoot in the remote barn guarded by devilish masked men? Has All Hallows Eve mischief taken a malevolent turn? Or is the pleading ghost of a trick-or-treater a frightening omen of doom?  

30 review for Odd Is on Our Side

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Another Manga graphic novel featuring Koontz's Odd protagonist in his earlier years. I like this one much better than the first graphic novel. This one felt complete and untrusted. Also, it felt a little more true to the original Odd Thomas novel. Even though this are prequels, I continue to believe it is better appreciated after reading a few of the books. Also (view spoiler)[this series of graphic novels makes me sad we only get Stormy in the first novel of the main storyline (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Crazy little brown owl

    A significant improvement from the first Odd Thomas Graphic Novel, In Odd We Trust. This is a great Halloween read since the story takes place on Halloween duh :-) I like that Dean is allowing this series of graphic novels to take a different direction from his books. It's almost like an alternate reality - I'm a big fan of the television series FRINGE. :-) I'm rating this a 4 star book - keep in mind that although there is nothing super fantastically amazing in this little book, I rate based on t A significant improvement from the first Odd Thomas Graphic Novel, In Odd We Trust. This is a great Halloween read since the story takes place on Halloween duh :-) I like that Dean is allowing this series of graphic novels to take a different direction from his books. It's almost like an alternate reality - I'm a big fan of the television series FRINGE. :-) I'm rating this a 4 star book - keep in mind that although there is nothing super fantastically amazing in this little book, I rate based on the time and effort I put into the book and what I get in return - I didn't have to invest much into this and it entertained me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    A young man who can see the souls of dead people tries to stop a Halloween tragedy. I thought that some aspects of the story were very familiar but overall it was still a reasonable read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Fun little Halloween tale. Getting to know Stormy remains a bittersweet experience.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this graphic novel. I haven’t read any of the others in the Odd series(novels or graphic novels) but I still enjoyed jumping in and meeting these characters. This book got me attached to and intrigued by Odd so I may go check out the novels. This is the story of Odd Thomas. He can see dead people and when he starts seeing them warning him, he wonders what’s about to happen. It’s Halloween and there’s a “safe Halloween” event as well as a rude pumpkin rolling event by the school jocks wh I enjoyed this graphic novel. I haven’t read any of the others in the Odd series(novels or graphic novels) but I still enjoyed jumping in and meeting these characters. This book got me attached to and intrigued by Odd so I may go check out the novels. This is the story of Odd Thomas. He can see dead people and when he starts seeing them warning him, he wonders what’s about to happen. It’s Halloween and there’s a “safe Halloween” event as well as a rude pumpkin rolling event by the school jocks where they steal jack o lanterns and roll them down a hill. At some point in the past, there was an evil man who handed out poisoned candy and injured many kids and killed one. He had also fatally poisoned his wife. He gets released from jail and dresses up like a woman and fills the party piñata with poisoned candy and sets a bomb (thus the evil that the dead people were warning Odd about). In the end, Odd and his gf Stormy save the day, along with writer Ozzie and his editor. I thought this graphic novel was good but kind of blah. It was also somewhat hard to pick up after you put it down since there’s quite a few characters. Overall entertaining and intriguing but I would definitely go with the novels if I wanted more from this series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edoardo Albert

    Ah, the pitfalls of being a franchise author. Now, I thought it was simply a matter of chucking out a few half-formed ideas to your writerly minion and then sitting back and counting the royalties as they flow in, while throwing the odd (get it?) groat to your amanuensis but, it turns out, that is not the case at all. So, here you are, Dean Koontz, bestselling author, owner of the best hair transplant this side of Elton John, dog owner and, now, faithful Catholic after a rather dodgy period in y Ah, the pitfalls of being a franchise author. Now, I thought it was simply a matter of chucking out a few half-formed ideas to your writerly minion and then sitting back and counting the royalties as they flow in, while throwing the odd (get it?) groat to your amanuensis but, it turns out, that is not the case at all. So, here you are, Dean Koontz, bestselling author, owner of the best hair transplant this side of Elton John, dog owner and, now, faithful Catholic after a rather dodgy period in your youth when you embraced some distinctly dodgy form of nihilistic transhumanism (I must be one of the few people to have read Koontz's 1976 novel A Darkness in My Soul which backs up this contention), and now, after working all your life seven days a week turning out four novels a year you think maybe it's time to sit back, work the kinks out of your typing fingers and let someone else bring in a few of the bucks. See, you've got this bestselling character that your fans have really warmed to - and he's a bit of a personal favourite too - and your agent mentioned this manga stuff to you a while back and you still remember the sting: 'What's more, you don't even have to write it, Dean. The characters are so strong, they'll take the strain even if someone else does the writing.' And you think, 'Yeah... They are, aren't they. It'd be kind of interesting to see how someone else sees them - at least till the movie deal comes through. Why not?' 'Of course, you get script approval, Dean.' Turns out, that was just as well. Ozzie Boone black? Well, you could live with that, even if it wasn't how you saw him, but then you read the plot and, yes, it's yet another mad-fundy-Christian-poisons-trick-or-treaters potboiler. Look, you know potboilers, you've stewed enough plots in your time to feed half the homeless in Pico Mundo, and even you wouldn't stoop that low, even if you weren't, actually, you know, a Christian rather than someone like, er, Fred Van Lente, who apparently gets all his knowledge of this obscure sect from the more lurid episodes of cop shows and the anthropological investigations of Salon and the Huffington Post. You take a deep sigh. You run a red line through that particular plotline. You suggest something else and you resolve that, in future, you'll write your own books. Leave the author farming to Clive Cussler and James Patterson; you're an honest workman and you resolve to remain so.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nefariousbig

    What can one say about ole Odd? Dean Koontz doesn't make me feel silly for liking him. It actually makes me feel good when I find a character that holds my interest through a series. While the stories are all somewhat predictable, they are always entertaining, funny, and sometimes melancholy. In the new graphic novels, manga artist Queenie Chan, does a great job illustrating the Odd stories. She gives Odd a face that looks EXACTLY as one might imagine. The images don't detract from the stories, What can one say about ole Odd? Dean Koontz doesn't make me feel silly for liking him. It actually makes me feel good when I find a character that holds my interest through a series. While the stories are all somewhat predictable, they are always entertaining, funny, and sometimes melancholy. In the new graphic novels, manga artist Queenie Chan, does a great job illustrating the Odd stories. She gives Odd a face that looks EXACTLY as one might imagine. The images don't detract from the stories, they actually give more of a connection to the "oddness" that Koontz is weaving. A quick read that offers something entertaining to look at AND read. "If all the hitchhikers I picked up were as interesting as Odd, I would just drive around picking up hitchhikers!" -- fpw

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I had no idea this was a graphic novel when I bought it from the Kindle store. Graphic novels don't work well on electronic book-readers. That being said, I'm not sure what benefit illustrating an Odd Thomas book confers. Koontz is a master at connecting us with, and stimulating, our imagination. Why try to illustrate a short version of a classic series? It doesn't work for me on many levels. Don't buy it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy Caudill

    In Odd is on Our Side, Odd Thomas, a character from Koontz’s series of novels, sees dead people and tries to assist them in crossing over. This graphic novel features a Halloween celebration in Odd’s native Pico Mundo, CA. Odd, with the help of his girlfriend Stormy, investigates when Odd begins seeing bodachs, ominous heralds of death, creeping around town. In a plot that is one part Sixth Sense and one part Scooby Doo, Odd follows clues that leads him on a wild goose chase after devil-mask wea In Odd is on Our Side, Odd Thomas, a character from Koontz’s series of novels, sees dead people and tries to assist them in crossing over. This graphic novel features a Halloween celebration in Odd’s native Pico Mundo, CA. Odd, with the help of his girlfriend Stormy, investigates when Odd begins seeing bodachs, ominous heralds of death, creeping around town. In a plot that is one part Sixth Sense and one part Scooby Doo, Odd follows clues that leads him on a wild goose chase after devil-mask wearing teens stealing jack-o-lanterns to toss downhill for the annual Pumpkin Roll, to a young costume-wearing ghost, and into the history of the man who poisoned the town’s trick-or-treaters twenty-five years earlier. In the end, Odd and his friends find that the true danger comes not from the supernatural, but a criminal in disguise, and only they have the means and the knowledge to save the town. Despite a full cast of quirky characters, including resident eccentric novelist Ozzie Boone, his editor Valerie Malovent, and the helpful shade of Elvis Presley, this story is mostly plot-driven, with numerous twists and turns that kept me on my toes yet all came together in the end. The illustrations were all done in black and white, and while not as detailed as in some other graphic novels I’ve read, conveyed the action well and were an integral part of the story. In fact, some pages were wholly or mostly artwork, but still carried the weight of the tale. This was a very enjoyable story that I thought did very well in this format and I award it four and a half stars, and recommend it to fans of the paranormal as well as fans of Dean Koontz’s works.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Echevarria

    I enjoyed “Odd Is On Our Side” a little more then the first one “In Odd We Trust.” Again this is a prequel to the first Odd Thomas novel. This is the second of three different prequel graphic novels about Odd Thomas. Just like the first one it was cool to see the characters we have read about come to life in a comic book format. This time Odd’s friend and writer Ozzy is featured heavily and it is cool to see how Dean Koontz envisioned him. In the back of the book we get to see more of Dean Koont I enjoyed “Odd Is On Our Side” a little more then the first one “In Odd We Trust.” Again this is a prequel to the first Odd Thomas novel. This is the second of three different prequel graphic novels about Odd Thomas. Just like the first one it was cool to see the characters we have read about come to life in a comic book format. This time Odd’s friend and writer Ozzy is featured heavily and it is cool to see how Dean Koontz envisioned him. In the back of the book we get to see more of Dean Koontz’s notes and ideas about why the characters look like. It helps since sometimes these character descriptions are vague in the main series. Seeing Odd’s and Stormy’s relationship in these graphic novels is the real highlight for me. (They even go on adventures together.) If anything Dean Koontz writes really romantic and believable relationships not based on sex and attraction alone. I love their dialogue, banter and chemistry. For that reason if you care at all about these characters I would suggest giving these graphic novels a shot. However if you have no interest in the main novels then I suggest giving the graphic novels a hard pass. These comics only serve to enrich the main novels and add more flavor to them. These prequel stories could be considered really entertaining filler at best.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    After reading the original Odd Thomas series by Dean Koontz, I felt like there was more of the story to tell. I had done research before and, because I didn't have time to read all the books in time, I decided to watch the movie instead. I ended up completely falling in love with the character of Odd and his girlfriend, Stormy. They reminded me of my own relationship and was crying by the end of it. So I finally was at a place that I could read the series in totality. I wondered how in the world After reading the original Odd Thomas series by Dean Koontz, I felt like there was more of the story to tell. I had done research before and, because I didn't have time to read all the books in time, I decided to watch the movie instead. I ended up completely falling in love with the character of Odd and his girlfriend, Stormy. They reminded me of my own relationship and was crying by the end of it. So I finally was at a place that I could read the series in totality. I wondered how in the world Odd could survive for six more books without his beloved Stormy, but he had enough to keep him busy. I had seen the graphic novels before, but was wary of them. For some reason, I thought that they were separate from the Odd Thomas I knew and loved, but it wasn't until recently that I discovered they took place before the first book began. I knew I just had to read them. Because they are graphic novels, I read them very fast and could not put them down. Being able to see Odd was a nice change, too. After I finished reading Saint Odd I watched the movie once again only to be disappointed in the fact that they would never seen a sequel. Anton Yelchin, rest his soul, was perfect for the role of Odd so anyone who tries to replace him is most likely to fail.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marti Dolata

    I found this disappointing, although to be fair I should mention I read this just after powering through all the SAGA series by Vaughan. I found the art below mediocre and the stories lacking the charm of the novels. However, this may not be surprising as my impression is they are actually written by Fred Van Lente with Koontz's involvement limited to allowing his characters to be used and editing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dee Robb

    This is my first Dean Koontz novel. Not sure if it was the graphic format or if he’s really that bad of a writer....I did not enjoy this at all. There was little to no character development, the storyline was predictable and the dialogue was boring and forced. Not sure that I will bother with any more Koontz.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Page

    I liked the first graphic novel in the series better, but this was still a welcome addition. Unfortunately, the story was nowhere near as intricate and polished as Mr. Koontz's typical work--some of the scenes seemed a little unlikely and awkward. As with the first graphic novel, it was nice to see the "behind the scenes" info and preview of the next novel at the end.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Penney

    I've read the first three Odd Thomas books and I loved them. I'm not sure how I feel about this graphic novel. I can't decide if I just didn't enjoy it because it doesn't stack up for me on its own merit, or because I kept (unintentionally) comparing it to the real books. Either way, it will never be revisited

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Zottola

    As an Odd Thomas fan, I picked up all three graphic novels on a whim. While comparatively short relative to his normal books, they're hard to put down, and the length actually helped keep me invested in them. This second one was about as good as the first one, with a little more dynamite and a little less one-on-one fighting. It left me anxious to read the final one the next day.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Deleon

    Recommended for ODD fans like me! Not really a graphic novel fan. I remember them as comic books. Anyway I'm glad to have found it at the e-book library. Now I have to buy it for my Odd collection. A fan!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jill Kenna

    This was really good! I loved the short story about Halloween

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    All the flavor of Koontz's Odd Thomas novels, but in a shorter, fun graphic novel format.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Angela Lewis

    Not really my thing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    A graphic novel I am an Odd Thomas fan and did not realize I was checking out a graphic novel. That said a graphic novel on a kindle was a delightful change of pace.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Better than the last one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Sweet little Odd Thomas story. Good to see Dean's vision for Ozzie pretty much matched with mine.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erik Larson

    I love the Odd Thomas series, but apparently the graphic novels aren't my thing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Myers

    Really enjoyed the story that Odd had to deal with in this graphic novel. Fun.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lenora Fukui

    I expected more, it was okay. It was a comic book. Not what I expected for an Odd Thomas. When I read Dean's books, I have my on visions of the players, and what I saw were not what I envision.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    This was a very easy-to-read graphic novel that I found enjoyable enough but would have preferred something darker, considering that Dean Koontz is a horror writer. In terms of plot, it was rather reminiscent of a Scooby Doo episode but with genuine supernatural elements to it. I hadn't read anything by Koontz before, although I note that while he created the Odd Thomas character, Fred Van Lente is actually credited as the lead author of this co-written book. This may mean that the writing's sty This was a very easy-to-read graphic novel that I found enjoyable enough but would have preferred something darker, considering that Dean Koontz is a horror writer. In terms of plot, it was rather reminiscent of a Scooby Doo episode but with genuine supernatural elements to it. I hadn't read anything by Koontz before, although I note that while he created the Odd Thomas character, Fred Van Lente is actually credited as the lead author of this co-written book. This may mean that the writing's style belongs more to Van lente than to Koontz. The artwork (by Queenie Chan) is good, although a couple of times I felt the main characters looked a little inhuman, though I'm sure this was unintentional. I was also surprised to read in the first chapter of Koontz's Forever Odd, excerpted towards the end of the book, that Odd Thomas is 21 because the way Chan has drawn him suggests that he is aged 17. This doesn't really matter as the age difference is not huge and it doesn't materially affect the story. It was interesting to read in another appendix towards the rear - the 'Artist's sketchbook' - that Chan had originally assumed that one character was black while Koontz insisted that he was white and should be drawn accordingly. Unless the character's race is significant in another of the Odd Thomas books, I wonder if it really matters what race the character belongs to - and I suspect this is Chan's point of view as well. In the final appendix, 'Script development', one can see however that Koontz is concerned to maintain factual consistency between the graphic novels and the full-text novels he has written about Odd Thomas, and this makes a lot of sense. The excerpt of Forever Odd has a darker theme than Odd is on our side, as it involves the ghost of a man who has just recently been murdered. So, from the point of view of horror, the full-text novels might be preferable to the graphic versions. Overall, though, I found Odd is on our side to be a quick and entertaining read, a nice break from reading full-text novels, and an introduction to Koontz that leaves me wanting to try something else by him as well.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Taksya

    Seconda grafic novel dedicata alla serie di Odd Thomas. Storia carina e personaggi in parte, ma solo un terzo del volume (a stare larghi) era dedicato al fumetto. Il restante spazio adeguatamente suddiviso tra un capitolo del primo libro e la descrizione dello studio sulla genesi dei disegni e dei personaggi. Se tanto mi da tanto, il terzo volume avrà solo 10 pagine di fumetto e il resto di approfondimento.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Yaddof

    "Odd is on Our Side" is actually the second book in this series of graphic novels by Dean Koontz, not to be confused with the original novel published in 2003. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California and Odd the fry cook has uncanny ability to sense supernatural activity. In fact Odd can see ghosts. Elvis is a frequent visitor and comes to warn Odd of something. The problem is that Odd can only see ghosts. They can’t communicate with him. Odd has a feeling something big is going to happen when "Odd is on Our Side" is actually the second book in this series of graphic novels by Dean Koontz, not to be confused with the original novel published in 2003. It’s Halloween in Pico Mundo, California and Odd the fry cook has uncanny ability to sense supernatural activity. In fact Odd can see ghosts. Elvis is a frequent visitor and comes to warn Odd of something. The problem is that Odd can only see ghosts. They can’t communicate with him. Odd has a feeling something big is going to happen when he spots the unusual sight of a child dressed as a ghost trick or treating in the neighborhood. The community had banned door-to-door trick-or-treating ten years before when Norman Turley poisoned candy sending 5 children to the hospital. One of them died. Odd also sees bodachs, supernatural beasts that appear when death is near. Judging by the number of bodachs Odd sees, a lot of people are going to die. In this horror fiction graphic novel, Dean Koontz and Fred Ban Lente spin a tale of suspense and mystery. The illustrations by Queenie Chan bring the characters to life. Readers are left wondering what Elvis is trying to say, why a child is alone trick-or-treating, what is up with the bodachs, and finding the bad guy. This book is recommended to pre-teens and young teens that enjoy ghost stories and young heroes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sara Thompson

    This is the second graphic novel written for the Odd Thomas series. I rather like the series. I have read the first Odd Thomas novel and plan on reading more when I make time (so many books so little time). This edition is a unique story to the series which is really nice since the first graphic novel was a rendition of the first book. I like this story and it returns to a time before Odd's girlfriend was murdered. I really like her character and it's nice to have her back. I really like Odd - he This is the second graphic novel written for the Odd Thomas series. I rather like the series. I have read the first Odd Thomas novel and plan on reading more when I make time (so many books so little time). This edition is a unique story to the series which is really nice since the first graphic novel was a rendition of the first book. I like this story and it returns to a time before Odd's girlfriend was murdered. I really like her character and it's nice to have her back. I really like Odd - he's such a normalish kid. Odd is a fry cook for a local diner with a comfortable life. He doesn't really wish for anything more except a life with his girlfriend Stormy. He just happens to see ghosts. He feels compelled to follow through with his bad feelings and he occasionally helps the police. He doesn't want to be in law enforcement and he doesn't really want anyone to know he can see ghosts - except those close to him. He knows his gift is meant for helping the dead so he doesn't mind helping them. He's so candid it's refreshing. Odd doesn't really have any existential crisis' nor does he dislike his life in any way. I like that he's content. And I really like that everyone just accepts him the way he is. There are days I would love to live in Odd's world and know that everything is going to work out fine if I just believe in myself.

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