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Frankenstein: The Graphic Novel

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Man has long had the power to take life, but what will happen when he learns to give it? Intrigued by this question, young Victor Frankenstein - a devoted student of science - becomes obsessed with the idea of conjuring life out of 'lifeless matter'. Using his formidable skills in chemistry and other sciences, Victor begins to assemble a being from scavenged and stolen bod Man has long had the power to take life, but what will happen when he learns to give it? Intrigued by this question, young Victor Frankenstein - a devoted student of science - becomes obsessed with the idea of conjuring life out of 'lifeless matter'. Using his formidable skills in chemistry and other sciences, Victor begins to assemble a being from scavenged and stolen body parts. Once he has fathered a son created by his own science, Victor rejects the hideous creature he has brought to life. Eventually, the creature mounts a campaign of revenge against his creator, struggling to be recognised as a thinking, feeling being. And so begins the battle between father and son... First published anonymously in 1818, Frankenstein was the brainchild of author Mary Shelley. Over the years, this classic tale has been retold many times in several different formats. Campfire's faithful graphic novel adaptation of Frankenstein brings an important and timeless story back to life.


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Man has long had the power to take life, but what will happen when he learns to give it? Intrigued by this question, young Victor Frankenstein - a devoted student of science - becomes obsessed with the idea of conjuring life out of 'lifeless matter'. Using his formidable skills in chemistry and other sciences, Victor begins to assemble a being from scavenged and stolen bod Man has long had the power to take life, but what will happen when he learns to give it? Intrigued by this question, young Victor Frankenstein - a devoted student of science - becomes obsessed with the idea of conjuring life out of 'lifeless matter'. Using his formidable skills in chemistry and other sciences, Victor begins to assemble a being from scavenged and stolen body parts. Once he has fathered a son created by his own science, Victor rejects the hideous creature he has brought to life. Eventually, the creature mounts a campaign of revenge against his creator, struggling to be recognised as a thinking, feeling being. And so begins the battle between father and son... First published anonymously in 1818, Frankenstein was the brainchild of author Mary Shelley. Over the years, this classic tale has been retold many times in several different formats. Campfire's faithful graphic novel adaptation of Frankenstein brings an important and timeless story back to life.

30 review for Frankenstein: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kritika Narula

    I have always wanted to venture into classic horror, and was recently compiling a list of the best horror books, when I realised I never read the pioneers. Considering my time crunch and scanty attention-spans, a graphic novel seemed like a good excuse, and it indeed was. I finished it within a couple of hours and loved the plot. I am pretty sure there would have been scope for contemplation in the original text 9 a lot more than in this graphic edition) but the macabre quality of it was brought I have always wanted to venture into classic horror, and was recently compiling a list of the best horror books, when I realised I never read the pioneers. Considering my time crunch and scanty attention-spans, a graphic novel seemed like a good excuse, and it indeed was. I finished it within a couple of hours and loved the plot. I am pretty sure there would have been scope for contemplation in the original text 9 a lot more than in this graphic edition) but the macabre quality of it was brought out well here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    *This review contains spoilers!* If you appreciate the classic horror, you will love this graphic novel adaptation. Also, if you appreciate physiological horror more than gory horror you will like this comic. The novel is told through the perspective of Victor Frankenstein as he darkly reminisces over his creation of a monster. At first, Victor is thrilled with the fact the he manages to create life. He soon becomes horrified with the thought as he thinks he sees the creature following him every *This review contains spoilers!* If you appreciate the classic horror, you will love this graphic novel adaptation. Also, if you appreciate physiological horror more than gory horror you will like this comic. The novel is told through the perspective of Victor Frankenstein as he darkly reminisces over his creation of a monster. At first, Victor is thrilled with the fact the he manages to create life. He soon becomes horrified with the thought as he thinks he sees the creature following him everywhere. Victor is also tormented because he is the only one who knows that he set a creature lose into the world. Frankenstein decides to go after his creation. When he sees it, the creature demands that his creator listen to the story of how he came to be. The creature tells Victor that he is lonely, and wants a bride. At first, Victor refuses. Outraged, the creature threatens to take revenge on Victor's family. Victor reluctantly agrees. While creating the bride, Victor starts to question if the creature and the bride will even like one another. What if they want to have children? Victor destroys the bride out of fear of his creations. The creature, witnessing his bride's destruction, attacks Victor's family and runs off. Victor chases his creation and vows to get revenge. He wants the creature to suffer as his suffered. In the end, Victor dies miserable as he has lost everything. The creature leaves claiming he will die soon as well. I thought this graphic novel adaptation took an interesting standpoint on interpreting the creature and creator's relationship. For one thing, the story is told in such a way that you cannot easily tell who is more 'evil'. Both Victor and the creature have moments where they wish to extract revenge upon the other. Victor cries aloud "I swear to pursue the demon who caused this misery, until he or I die in mortal conflict!" (63) The creature warns his master "I will take revenge for my injuries. If I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear. I will destroy you" (41). This relationship, where there is no definitive 'evil' reminded me of the manga series "Death Note". You could say that Light's intentions as Kira are both good and bad. Who is more evil? Kira for using the Death Note? Or the 'evil' criminals Kira is killing? The concept of Kira being a god-like figure also reminds me of "Frankenstein". Victor had 'good' intentions of using science to create life, but it ended badly when the creature's loneliness caused him to rebel. You might be thinking that this "Frankenstein" graphic novel will be a gory depiction full of severed limbs. It actually isn't. The images are done cleanly and mostly focus on Victor's excitement. I think the true 'horror' aspect is done psychologically. The images make you feel what the character feels. You feel Victor's anxiety as he waits for the creature's return. You feel the creature's loneliness as we find him alone in the forest. Although this novel does fall under the 'horror' genre, the psychology makes you think about the characters more so than all the stiches Victor is sewing as he creates the monster. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys the classics, psychological horror, or the "Death Note" series. There is no 'good' or 'evil'. It is all perspective!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pinky

    I was initially interested in this book because I’ve heard a lot of hype about Frankenstein and I’ve read an adaptation of the novel but never a graphic version. Mary Shelly wrote the original book and the graphic novel is by Gary Reed. I read the novel adaptation several years ago so I vaguely remembered the plot. Overall, I found the story incredibly sad and heart wrenching. I think the novel touches on the topic of nurture vs. nature. In this case Frankenstein’s monster was created kind and b I was initially interested in this book because I’ve heard a lot of hype about Frankenstein and I’ve read an adaptation of the novel but never a graphic version. Mary Shelly wrote the original book and the graphic novel is by Gary Reed. I read the novel adaptation several years ago so I vaguely remembered the plot. Overall, I found the story incredibly sad and heart wrenching. I think the novel touches on the topic of nurture vs. nature. In this case Frankenstein’s monster was created kind and became evil because of the way he was treated by society. Throughout the novel I hoped Frankenstein and his monster would one day make amends and their conflict would be resolved. Of course I was disappointed when Frankenstein died on the ship without getting his revenge or settling his differences with the monster. Therefore the ending left me with little closure. I really enjoyed the illustrations in this novel, I think the captions described the story perfectly and I found a very fun and enjoyable read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Young Reader Reaction: Our 10 year old picked this out of a pile of graphic novels because she had heard about Frankenstein before (television shows, book references). She also likes scary stories. She stuck with this one until about halfway through, but then gave up. She found some of the references frustrating, and once Victor finished creating his being, she was no longer interested. Adult Reader Reaction: A graphic novel is a fantastic way to read this story. The narrative is exactly as I rem Young Reader Reaction: Our 10 year old picked this out of a pile of graphic novels because she had heard about Frankenstein before (television shows, book references). She also likes scary stories. She stuck with this one until about halfway through, but then gave up. She found some of the references frustrating, and once Victor finished creating his being, she was no longer interested. Adult Reader Reaction: A graphic novel is a fantastic way to read this story. The narrative is exactly as I remember it (it is the original text), but having the images kept me more interested in reading and help with a visual context to the story. Pros: Readers of all types will enjoy the visual experience of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as a graphic novel. To read our full review, go to The Reading Tub®.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bibliofiendlm

    Upholds the integrity of the classic novel w/ good graphics - definitely a contender for teaching in the future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stacey (bookishpursuit)

    3.5 A fun way to brush up on the main points of Frankenstein. I enjoyed having the illustrations, but missed Shelley's lyrical prose.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Candice Snow

    Even if you've never read the classic, you still might enjoy this. The artwork was a very rough, sketched type that helped bring out the feel of the time period.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Komiksové spracovanie Frankensteina - jednohubka na večer. Docela to ušlo, určite to pokladám za dobrý materiál ku štúdiu (z tejto verzie by mal každý pochopiť pointu a vedieť podať stručný obsah) alebo navnadeniu na čítanie kníh tohto typu. Mne sa knihy z tejto edície páčia, rada sa nimi pripomínam moje obľúbené príbehy na ktoré nemám aktuálne čas, tak sa musím uspokojiť s kratšími verziami :).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pavani

    An amazing way to revisit such classics in a quick and refreshing style. Thoroughly enjoyed the graphical depiction of this story. Was great fun!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I’ve read the original of Frankenstein, but when it comes to remembering the story all I remember is the gist of it and a few other things, not the actual chronological storyline. I think that is also coloured by a lot of movie adaptations I’ve watched so I can’t really say if it’s a true to story adaptation or not. I believe it is, going from a very vague recollection, and I do remember some lines which have been used as well. Basically I’m reviewing the graphic novel for the graphic novel and n I’ve read the original of Frankenstein, but when it comes to remembering the story all I remember is the gist of it and a few other things, not the actual chronological storyline. I think that is also coloured by a lot of movie adaptations I’ve watched so I can’t really say if it’s a true to story adaptation or not. I believe it is, going from a very vague recollection, and I do remember some lines which have been used as well. Basically I’m reviewing the graphic novel for the graphic novel and not the original influence. There is one comparison I wish to make towards the original one though. The original bored me and annoyed me, even though I enjoy the story of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley’s novel did not do it for me. It doesn’t matter if I read the original or watch/read an adaptation though when it comes to my view of Victor Frankenstein because I always thought he was a nitwit. A moaning nitwit. And that Frankenstein’s monster was far more intelligent than his creator. Granted he turned to a life of murder because of being mishandled and that’s not necessarily an excuse, but I still feel he is far more intelligent than Victor. For the rest of my review and yes it is on the longer side.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie Rylie

    I have a thing for Frankenstein... I love the moral behind all of this that I have written about before when I actually read Mary Shelley's but this was a very good adaptation. Yet again, I was not crazy about the graphics but the most important content and dialogues were there. I should do this graphic novels of books I loved before more often... It really revives what you once read and it is always pleasant to go back to books such as this one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Austin Miller

    Grade/interest level: 5-8 Reading level: Genre: Fiction Main Characters: Frankenstein Setting: Woods POV: First Frankenstein creates a monster out of stuff he dug up in a graveyard. Then the monster goes on a rampage. Then the beast threatens to kill kill his soon to be wife. The beast says, "If you do not make me a girlfriend." Frankenstein makes the girl but then he destroys her. Find out why when you read the book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lesli

    Junior high or Freshman level adaptation of the novel. Some "on page" violence. Probably a more faithful retelling than the middle grade GN from Stone Arch. There is an intentional roughness to the artwork that annoys me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    more of a 3.5

  15. 4 out of 5

    EL

    Fitting in a little halloween read

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rohan Vyas

    Illustrations were brilliantly done but the graphical representation just reduced the effect of Shelly's lyrical pose. But still a fun read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stevie

    Great drawings (a bit gruesome at times), great abbrivated version of a classic.

  18. 4 out of 5

    susan ronald

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen Kotrba

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Labonte

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sonny

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  27. 5 out of 5

    Simran Rehal

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Thorne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

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