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DC Comics Year by Year: A Visual Chronicle

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For more than 70 years, DC Comics has been entertaining children and adults alike. Here, for the first time, is the chronological account of the adventures of both the characters and the company that created them. The" DC Chronicle Year by Year" traces DC's fascinating story: the company's beginnings as National Allied Publications in the 1934, and its subsequent change t For more than 70 years, DC Comics has been entertaining children and adults alike. Here, for the first time, is the chronological account of the adventures of both the characters and the company that created them. The" DC Chronicle Year by Year" traces DC's fascinating story: the company's beginnings as National Allied Publications in the 1934, and its subsequent change to Detective Comics, Inc. in 1937. The book details all the major DC publishing landmarks and more, displayed clearly, month by month. Highlighting the debuts of Superman and Batman, the geniuses that invented them, and the real-life events-like the Vietnam War, the atom bomb, the Space Race- that shaped the atmosphere of the times, "DC Chronicle Year by Year" follows the characters' foray into the real world through TV series and blockbuster movies. Features original cover art by well-known DC artist Ryan Sook and a foreword by Paul Levitz, who was president of DC Comics from 2002 - 2009. TM & (c) DC Comics. All Rights Reserved.


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For more than 70 years, DC Comics has been entertaining children and adults alike. Here, for the first time, is the chronological account of the adventures of both the characters and the company that created them. The" DC Chronicle Year by Year" traces DC's fascinating story: the company's beginnings as National Allied Publications in the 1934, and its subsequent change t For more than 70 years, DC Comics has been entertaining children and adults alike. Here, for the first time, is the chronological account of the adventures of both the characters and the company that created them. The" DC Chronicle Year by Year" traces DC's fascinating story: the company's beginnings as National Allied Publications in the 1934, and its subsequent change to Detective Comics, Inc. in 1937. The book details all the major DC publishing landmarks and more, displayed clearly, month by month. Highlighting the debuts of Superman and Batman, the geniuses that invented them, and the real-life events-like the Vietnam War, the atom bomb, the Space Race- that shaped the atmosphere of the times, "DC Chronicle Year by Year" follows the characters' foray into the real world through TV series and blockbuster movies. Features original cover art by well-known DC artist Ryan Sook and a foreword by Paul Levitz, who was president of DC Comics from 2002 - 2009. TM & (c) DC Comics. All Rights Reserved.

30 review for DC Comics Year by Year: A Visual Chronicle

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ernest

    This is an amazing work that chronicles the major events, both storytelling and publishing, year by year in the DC universe. This work may overwhelm the casual fan, but for those interested in the history of DC (especially their superhero works), this is a fantastic read. I was entertained, educated and reminisced. I was actually happily surprised (and slightly disturbed) at how much I knew about the works and events discussed, especially as I prefer Marvel over DC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    A great look at the history of DC comics From its inception to 2011. Overall a plethora of information and knowledge.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    I got this out from the library not knowing what it was. It was interesting in places but too heavy and long as well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rich Rosell

    This massive coffee table book is a comprehensive look at DC comics, from the 1930s to 2010, broken down by key issues/characters/arcs year by year. As a historical reference it's a fascinating read, though admittedly it's not an especially critical look (especially during the questionable 1990s period). Note: this humongous oversized slip-cover edition weighs a ton - making it a challenge to find an easy to way to hold while reading. On the plus side, the artwork looks wonderful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica-Robyn

    This DC comics chronicle is fascinating, even for a new girl to the comic book world. Whenever a discussion of DC and its many past adventures pops up in geek conversation it's easy to get really lost, really fast for those of us who haven't been around since the hight of comics. I didn't grow up with DC and I didn't have my very own comics Yoda to teach me the ways of the ever evolving and remastered stories, so coming across DC Comics Year by Year was something I couldn't pass up reading. When This DC comics chronicle is fascinating, even for a new girl to the comic book world. Whenever a discussion of DC and its many past adventures pops up in geek conversation it's easy to get really lost, really fast for those of us who haven't been around since the hight of comics. I didn't grow up with DC and I didn't have my very own comics Yoda to teach me the ways of the ever evolving and remastered stories, so coming across DC Comics Year by Year was something I couldn't pass up reading. When I first got this from the library I was very impressed with what I had found. I wasn't expecting it to be as expansive and beautiful as it really was. The art on each page is printed beautifully, it is a huge book and has pages upon pages of interesting facts and useful information. I actually busted out my post it notes so I could tab the comic mentions that I personally found interesting so I could Google them the nearest chance I got. This book wasn't only incredibly fun to read and just look at, but it had so much information that even though it could be tiring at times to sift through, was well worth it for the most surprising little facts and notations. From the evolution of characters and their books, to the evolution of art, tone, style, politics, everything you can think of is covered here. The general history of DC comics and all the sunshiny, awe inducing stuff you love to see from your favourite heroes. I have a lot to learn when it comes to comic books and I found this visual chronicle to be one of the best resources I've come across. Diving head first into years upon years of comic book history can be intimidating, especially since this is only a small part of a much bigger picture but this was as fun and informative as I needed it to be. Recommended for anyone looking to take a expansive glimpse at all of DC's properties past and present.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    This was a really interesting read. It was also a really HEAVY one. It is a coffee-table style book with thick glossy pages, but that is actually a good thing since it allows the reader to get a really good look at all the graphics that are included on all the pages. Basically, the book is broken down into chapters by year, sections by decade. This allows the reader to get an overview of the most important things that happened in the DC Universe between 1935 and 2010. The presentation is really This was a really interesting read. It was also a really HEAVY one. It is a coffee-table style book with thick glossy pages, but that is actually a good thing since it allows the reader to get a really good look at all the graphics that are included on all the pages. Basically, the book is broken down into chapters by year, sections by decade. This allows the reader to get an overview of the most important things that happened in the DC Universe between 1935 and 2010. The presentation is really easy to read and interesting. The information is part commentary and part history that talks about all the major characters (superheroes and otherwise) that popped up in the various titles owned by DC. That included the Wildstorm and the Vertigo imprints as well as other companies that DC ended up gobbling up. The book does not summarize all of the storylines that took place, but it does highlight most of the major ones while also talking about the evolution of various characters and how their looks and histories changed. These included those from the horror, romance, Western, and animal kingdoms as well as their more famous superheroes. I was really glad I read this one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex Escalante

    Wow. I half expected a quick and general overview of DC throughout its history. What I got instead was a year by year, month by pretty much month account of what was being released and some of the background info on that release. This is a thorough, fascinating read about the origins all the way up to the present day (well about 2010) of DC comics. It presents month by month what was being released at the time, with an accompanying article written about the book. It has decade overviews and year Wow. I half expected a quick and general overview of DC throughout its history. What I got instead was a year by year, month by pretty much month account of what was being released and some of the background info on that release. This is a thorough, fascinating read about the origins all the way up to the present day (well about 2010) of DC comics. It presents month by month what was being released at the time, with an accompanying article written about the book. It has decade overviews and yearly overviews. It has hi res full page images of famous DC covers or panels. It really gives you a solid look at how DC started out, to what it is today. I really enjoyed this. I've never been a fan of Golden age books, but this gives me a general overview of what was occurring at the time and how the stories reflected that. And it gave brief explanations of the plots that were being written to the point that it now makes me want to go back and modern books that reference these golden age stories. Stories from Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, Mark Millar, they all make subtle references or loud outcries to the golden age, and I feel like I have a more solid foundation in regards to DC where I would appreciate those nods and references to the Golden age. The only thing I found lacking was that I wish they would give a bit more info on creators, maybe like sidebars with quick bio's on the writers and artists that we keep reading about who worked on these books. But nevertheless, put aside some time to read this, because it has alot of information and it takes its time to tell you the history. Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys the history of comic books.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Langley

    Great history of DC comics though as it got to modern day it heaped on more praise than I feel the company deserves. Not a book for anyone not a comic enthusiast or with at least a good knowledge of the DC comics universe.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trey

    I think I enjoyed the idea of reading this book more than actually plowing through it. The earlier years were a little more interesting to me, when I could pick up information I didn't already know. I did learn a few nuggets about the progression of popularity of superhero, romance, war, and funny animal comics, but I think I would have preferred an overview that wasn't created in-house as a tribute to DC's work. Each decade gets a preview blurb, and as the title suggests, each year in the histor I think I enjoyed the idea of reading this book more than actually plowing through it. The earlier years were a little more interesting to me, when I could pick up information I didn't already know. I did learn a few nuggets about the progression of popularity of superhero, romance, war, and funny animal comics, but I think I would have preferred an overview that wasn't created in-house as a tribute to DC's work. Each decade gets a preview blurb, and as the title suggests, each year in the history of DC Comics is highlighted. Each year gets its own summary, and shows a its most important hits, noted by a title, issue number, cover image, and a blurb (the length depending on the importance of the event). There are multiple problems with these issue summaries. Often the cover image is very small, to accommodate several other issues per page. This cuts down on the details of the image and the readability of the word balloons. Often, it looks like the very edges of the cover have been cropped to zoom in on the image in an attempt to combat this problem, but I was often more distracted by that than appreciative of the main picture being 1% larger. Sometimes the write-up of the issue was a good indication of why that issue or series was important to DC's history, but often (expecially in the later years) it would devolve into a list of what titles were involved in the ensuing crossover, who wrote those various titles, and who drew them. I suppose that's useful information if you don't have any other way of crediting the writers and artists, but it wasn't very interesting and it took up space that could have been put to better use. Occasionally, the blurb would be about a little-known, short-lived series that didn't make it. I was torn between being interested and upset by those; didn't they have anything more important to talk about than five issues of Pat Boone comics in 1959? Although, if they don't mention those series, I guess no one would ever know they existed. Also, the choice of issues to discuss leans very, very heavily toward #1 issues. In any given year, you are looking at 90% or more #1's. Certainly talking about the kickoff of a series is important, but the overwhelming promotion of #1 issues left me feeling like I was back in the '90s collector's market. The lack of discussion of events from the middle of so many series makes me wonder if anything of import ever happened. Are the DC milestones measured in events in the characters' lives or in sales figures? Ultimately, this volume is a glorified commercial for DC. They rarely mention failures, and when they do, they are often couched in softened language. They never admit that anything other than story and character drove their company (I guess it was only the other companies shoveling foil-covered garbage onto the market in the late '80s and '90s), and they never discuss their position relative to Marvel. You would think after reading this that DC dominated the sales charts from 1935 through 2010.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rog Harrison

    I have never been a great fan of DC comics though I did read a lot of them in the early 1960s and I did read some of their titles in the late 1980s. I saw this in a bookshop and it looked interesting so I bought a copy. It's a good read and I especially enjoyed the earlier decades as I had come across some of the characters in black and white UK annuals. I was a bit disappointed that some of the titles I had enjoyed were only mentioned in passing but that was hardly surprising.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    DC Comics Year by Year is another coffee table book celebrating DC Comics and its 75 years of publishing. A truly wonderful book with two page spreads chronicling the major (and some minor) story lines and milestones in the comic publisher's history. Just plain good stuff for the DC Comics fan or fans of the comic book itself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris Aylott

    Almost useless as comics history, but a fun visual tour of classic DC characters and covers. One thing that leaps out is that while many of the ideas that DC tried out went nowhere, there were very few years where they didn't come up with at least one lasting character or story. That said, the last 10 years look pretty crappy, with very few new ideas and a lot of overblown crossovers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    M

    This giant volume does what its predecessors could not - finally encapsulate the DC Comics universe. Rather than focusing on characters and stories, this volume highlights each year of the company's existence. Touchstone characters and events and referenced, trivia abounds, and even real-world ties are included. Though hefty in size, it is a great reference volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Month by month history of DC Comics from 1935 through 2010. Full of interesting trivia about their most famous characters and stories as well as several forgotten concepts and false starts. It's really interesting to see what was working in each year for mainstream comics. Must have for fans of DC.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian Taylor

    Everything you wanted to know about DC Comics, from the very beginning up until this book was published. The book is put together very well and is for every type of comic book fan, from newbies all the way to seasoned readers. You can't go wrong with it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Very well done book that chronicles first appearances, major (& minor) and benchmarks in publishing. It was fun locating when I started reading comics....and when I started buying. The bottom of each page also reports world news items to give further context.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dan Trudeau

    I own many coffee table books on DC and its characters' histories, including Les Daniels book on the company's first sixty years, and this is the best one I've ever read. The summaries are well written and have just the right amount of insight. The double page spreads are particularly beautiful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tym

    Got this for Christmas and loved every page of it most of the art was spectacular and the writing was good too, I only wished they had tapped more into their well of C-List characters that would have been fun.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chambers Stevens

    Only for the most hardcore fan. But if you are hardcore then this is for you.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John

    An entertaining look at one of the biggest names in comics

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Smith

    Great History Of DC Comics Hits all the high points.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andy Soria

    its a grate book with fantastic story

  23. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    A great month-by-month account from the 1930s to 2010 of DC Comics publication. Great format and a great Reference tool for anyone studying History, Pop Culture, or Comics.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Hilleland

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dani Armani

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Ginn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shantel Everfield

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy O'Connor

  29. 4 out of 5

    Arnel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chayce

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