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Black: The Birth of Evil

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Black. The Birth of Evil. While fleeing a hit man through the deserted alleys of Denver, a bullet clips Thomas Hunter's head. He escapes with his life, but later passes out from his wounds . . . and his world is swallowed by black. From the dark comes an amazing reality of another world--a world where evil is contained. A world where Thomas is in love with a beautiful woman. Black. The Birth of Evil. While fleeing a hit man through the deserted alleys of Denver, a bullet clips Thomas Hunter's head. He escapes with his life, but later passes out from his wounds . . . and his world is swallowed by black. From the dark comes an amazing reality of another world--a world where evil is contained. A world where Thomas is in love with a beautiful woman. A world that stands on the brink of annihilation. Where does the dream end and reality begin? Every time he falls asleep in one world, he awakens in the other--each facing unimaginable evil, an each with a fate unknowingly tied to the other. Some say the world hangs in the balance of every choice we make. Now the fate of two worlds hangs in the balance of one man's choice. That is, if he can live to see the end of the day.


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Black. The Birth of Evil. While fleeing a hit man through the deserted alleys of Denver, a bullet clips Thomas Hunter's head. He escapes with his life, but later passes out from his wounds . . . and his world is swallowed by black. From the dark comes an amazing reality of another world--a world where evil is contained. A world where Thomas is in love with a beautiful woman. Black. The Birth of Evil. While fleeing a hit man through the deserted alleys of Denver, a bullet clips Thomas Hunter's head. He escapes with his life, but later passes out from his wounds . . . and his world is swallowed by black. From the dark comes an amazing reality of another world--a world where evil is contained. A world where Thomas is in love with a beautiful woman. A world that stands on the brink of annihilation. Where does the dream end and reality begin? Every time he falls asleep in one world, he awakens in the other--each facing unimaginable evil, an each with a fate unknowingly tied to the other. Some say the world hangs in the balance of every choice we make. Now the fate of two worlds hangs in the balance of one man's choice. That is, if he can live to see the end of the day.

30 review for Black: The Birth of Evil

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dichotomy Girl

    So, 10 years ago or whenever I read the original novels, I absolutely LOVED them. Of course, I was super fundy Christian girl so finding books that were somewhat decently written and wouldn't send me to hell for reading them (Yeah, I'm talking to you Harry Potter!) wasn't the easiest thing in the world for a girl who read 300+ books a year. So enter the Circle Trilogy: Fantasy, Speculative and bio-thriller all rolled together with Christian Allegory. However, fast-forward 10 years. No longer supe So, 10 years ago or whenever I read the original novels, I absolutely LOVED them. Of course, I was super fundy Christian girl so finding books that were somewhat decently written and wouldn't send me to hell for reading them (Yeah, I'm talking to you Harry Potter!) wasn't the easiest thing in the world for a girl who read 300+ books a year. So enter the Circle Trilogy: Fantasy, Speculative and bio-thriller all rolled together with Christian Allegory. However, fast-forward 10 years. No longer super or fundy, the story didn't seem as original and exciting and the allegory was way too "in your face". So, I can't even pretend to be at all objective in my rating. Sadly, I will probably read the other two because I just can't help myself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heather Ingemar

    Really.... unusual. While the premise was interesting, I felt completely disoriented for the entire book. Too bad.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Maddaford

    The concept of this book was intriguing. A guy starts to see another world when he gets shot in the head. Every time he falls asleep he wakes up in the other world. Both worlds depend on his choices. There are lots of weird undertones though that don't really make sense until you read the other two books. I don't really remember the level of violence or language aside from Thomas getting shot and hunted by various parties. There might be some language, but it is probably more for affect because D The concept of this book was intriguing. A guy starts to see another world when he gets shot in the head. Every time he falls asleep he wakes up in the other world. Both worlds depend on his choices. There are lots of weird undertones though that don't really make sense until you read the other two books. I don't really remember the level of violence or language aside from Thomas getting shot and hunted by various parties. There might be some language, but it is probably more for affect because Dekker is a Christian author. I don't remember any sex or innuendo, but there was at least a kiss and talk of the Great Romance.

  4. 4 out of 5

    April

    I thought it was well done as a graphic novel. I did feel as though there were a few gaps/quick change overs between scenes but overall very good. Excellent cliff hanger of an ending! I look forward to reading the next in the series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Arnela

    THERE IS LIKE MAYBE 2 SPOILERS WHILE I WAS RANTING. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I'll be honest, not a fan of the art, at all. The coloring work done on it was nice but didn't have a redeeming affect on the art. The only reason I powered through the book itself was the story aspect, and I've got issues with that too. The reason I don't like the art comes in 2 parts. The first part has to do with the actual representation that art is supposed to do; at times, especially in an angle shot, the characters b THERE IS LIKE MAYBE 2 SPOILERS WHILE I WAS RANTING. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I'll be honest, not a fan of the art, at all. The coloring work done on it was nice but didn't have a redeeming affect on the art. The only reason I powered through the book itself was the story aspect, and I've got issues with that too. The reason I don't like the art comes in 2 parts. The first part has to do with the actual representation that art is supposed to do; at times, especially in an angle shot, the characters bodies are too distorted, the faces look static and too cartoony at the same time. Emotions fall flat and the anatomy is wonky in a few places. When you catch a few panels that look off, not only does it affect the reading experience, it can make you question how this got past editing. The second part is personal to me, I feel that the art has the match the story being told, to me it makes the story that much better, more immersive. A serious detective story should be gritty, a superhero story should have a lot of motion to it. The plot of this comic is sort of an end of humanity thriller and fantasy rolled in one, but the art supports neither of those aspects. The plot on the other hand is very interesting. Thomas is being hunted down by some loan sharks and upon passing out after a nasty run in wakes up in some medieval style forest with a bunch of scary monster bats. Every time he falls asleep he wakes up in the medieval world or our modern world, and he's trying very hard to save both. I know the comic is based on a novel, and like almost every comic that is, it suffers in entertainment value because it feels like we're summarizing the story, and it all feels very rushed, instead of actually showing the story pan out. A little more buildup wouldn't hurt, especially to raise tension in those rescue parts. I refuse to believe that a 432 page novel is adequately retold in 136 comic pages. Another issue is with the referencing to the bible. Don't get your nickers in a twist I ain't knocking your holy book, or any holy book for that matter, I'm just saying the use if a fruit of knowledge, the lion and the lamb, a disembodied voice speaking as your creator, some creature tempting you to eat from a forbidden fruit. It feels cliche, like there was no attempt to be creative with these representation, the bat is the devil, eat it and you are cast from the colorful forest, travel through the desert until finding safety, Thomas and Rachelle play the part of Adam and Eve basically, at the end of it. It just feels a little shoved in your face you know, like we're just trying to slap a fun modern cover on the bible. And another thing [it's 2 a.m. I'm just gunna complain] I don't like that the black bat is just stated as overall evil, like I believe you, but it's the fact that we the audience are just told he is bad, we're not shown it until the end. The literal point of a comic is to run home the fact of SHOW DON'T TELL. Show me he's bad, use flashbacks of him doing bad things, show him doing evil that the character can't see but we can, make the audience actually hate the villain, don't just point him out to us. I feel that a story is, at times, only as good as it's villain. If you can write a good villain, make the audience really hate them, then trust me they'll just keep reading to see what happens to him. Ok, trust me, I've read some really shitty [bad plot, bad characters, bad everything] books all because the story made me hate the villain, and I was hell bent on making sure he got what was coming to him by the end of the story. I mean I still want you to build your world, and expand your characters, but goddamn SHOW ME a villain worth my hate. There are only 2 more comics [I believe] in this series, and I will be giving them a go.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Stene

    I did sincerely enjoy the novel counter-part to this book. Is it Pulitzer Prize material, not really, but it's an enjoyable read, it's interesting, Dekker did an all around good job on it. So I was really intrigued about the graphic novel... then very suspicious when I saw it was only a quarter of the length of its source material... I'm not sold at all on the idea that simply adding an artistic landscape to a story is a good way to translate a written novel into a graphic novel, which is somethi I did sincerely enjoy the novel counter-part to this book. Is it Pulitzer Prize material, not really, but it's an enjoyable read, it's interesting, Dekker did an all around good job on it. So I was really intrigued about the graphic novel... then very suspicious when I saw it was only a quarter of the length of its source material... I'm not sold at all on the idea that simply adding an artistic landscape to a story is a good way to translate a written novel into a graphic novel, which is something I felt this adaptation was really relying heavily on. It felt like an early-stages storyboard for a film based off the series. There weren't any real artistic risks taken, and for a story that is so fantastical and out of this world (Or... beside it? Parallel? Perpendicular?) I feel like that was a mistake. However, I think that the most detrimental part to this adaptation is that it had to cut so much of its source material. There were plot holes galore, and any characterization at all from Dekker's original book was completely lost. I feel like if there had been the opportunity to use more of the original narrative, they would have had more to work with towards characterization and actual plot construction. I don't regret reading this book... it took me perhaps forty-five minutes overall, but I don't think it's a good graphic adaptation and that much more could have been done with it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    A little confusing at times, but works with the plot and the main character. Love the flipping back and forth between times/worlds. Can’t wait to read more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Love

    This four book series, despite all the changes in me and my world, still remains one of my favorites. When I was browsing at the library I just knew I had to read the graphic novel adaptations for nostalgias sake. While they could never compare with the actual novels, it really does take you back to those worlds in a really delightful way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This trilogy was recommended to me by one of the students enrolled in my World Religion class in fall 2009. A couple of interesting ideas couldn't make up for the poor writing and graphics. Alan Moore has said that film and comics are diametrically opposed art forms, and this graphic novel supports that assertion; Ted Dekker writes like Dan Brown, translating all the cliches of American blockbuster cinema into print, and the artwork mimics the conventions of film rather than using the power of th This trilogy was recommended to me by one of the students enrolled in my World Religion class in fall 2009. A couple of interesting ideas couldn't make up for the poor writing and graphics. Alan Moore has said that film and comics are diametrically opposed art forms, and this graphic novel supports that assertion; Ted Dekker writes like Dan Brown, translating all the cliches of American blockbuster cinema into print, and the artwork mimics the conventions of film rather than using the power of the image to supplement and subvert the accompanying prose. The story is about a young man on the run from mobsters (an irrelevant detail that only seems to start the story off in media res) who discovers that he exists in two worlds at once--the contemporary world and a fantastic far future world where talking bats have cleanly divided the Earth into a good half and an evil half. He unbelievably manages to convince a famous biochemist (after kidnapping her, no less) that he has insight into the future and knows that her company has developed a new vaccine that will instead mutate into an apocalyptic plague. (No wonder so many folks are now afraid of being vaccinated against swine flu.) Unfortunately his good intentions are used by the agencies of evil to prepare the ground for unleashing the plague, and, in the other world, forbidden fruit is consumed, unleashing the forces of evil onto the good half of the planet. I began the second installment in the graphic novel trilogy after I finished volume one, but I just couldn't go on after the first couple of pages. I've got a lot of other things I'd much rather read than a poorly written re-hashing of the Bible-as-rewritten-by-C.S.Lewis.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Vincent

    Thomas Hunter is finds himself trapped between two different times, the current and the future. In which both time, the world is facing a possible destruction. The current world is facing a virus threat that will sweep the world's entire population. And in the future world where good and evil is clearly separated by a river that runs around the whole earth, the evil half or the Shaitaki is about to invade the good half. It was really an interesting premise but the cardboard characters, bad graphi Thomas Hunter is finds himself trapped between two different times, the current and the future. In which both time, the world is facing a possible destruction. The current world is facing a virus threat that will sweep the world's entire population. And in the future world where good and evil is clearly separated by a river that runs around the whole earth, the evil half or the Shaitaki is about to invade the good half. It was really an interesting premise but the cardboard characters, bad graphics, poor dialogues and poor writing did not helped the book lived up to its potentials. Having a hero saving one world is a great deal but two is epic so somehow I admire Thomas for that but he was really far from being true. He is a kind of hero that puts his mission on top of his head and himself under his toes. Patriotic yet stupid. If I will base my writing from the storyline and the intention, I will give it 5 stars. Its sort of rare having a suspense-thriller sci-fi with a dash of allegories on Christian beliefs. Maybe it was a wrong choice reading the graphic novel-adaptation instead of the novel itself. Still, Black got me interested enough to read the second installment, Red, but not soon and certainly not the graphic novel adaptation. In a somehow unrelated topic, I was glad that the third book of this series is called white and not blue because that would make me feel uncomfortable. Look at the titles: Black, Red, White and the covers for my dearest The Hunger Games. It was not really fun having that kind of resemblance.

  11. 4 out of 5

    alana

    This graphic novel is adapted from Dekker's book Black...which I haven't read. The adaptation results in a choppy story that (presumably) skips over lots of details that would smooth out the transitions between scenes and fills in the significant plot holes. Unlike other graphic novels that are conceived with the visual aspects playing a key role in the storytelling, Black's illustrations fill uninspired overall -- focusing heavily on the characters in action rather than creating mood, tension, This graphic novel is adapted from Dekker's book Black...which I haven't read. The adaptation results in a choppy story that (presumably) skips over lots of details that would smooth out the transitions between scenes and fills in the significant plot holes. Unlike other graphic novels that are conceived with the visual aspects playing a key role in the storytelling, Black's illustrations fill uninspired overall -- focusing heavily on the characters in action rather than creating mood, tension, or a since of time passing. However, the bats are fabulous! Soft, white, fuzzy "good" bats and creepy, dark, "evil" bats. Woo! I think for young adult readers who are, well, reluctant to read, this book might possibly serve to pull them in to read the full length story. However, the constant gardner meets labyrinth hybrid seems to lack that YA-aura of "now."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Ben-ezra

    I really enjoyed the novels. I've read them a couple times, so I know the story well. When I saw the graphic novels, I was pretty excited, not because I love graphic novels, I'm not a big graphic novel fan usually, but because I LOVE Ted Dekker's stories. Being a big fan, it's unfortunate that I have to say that I think the adaptation is very poorly done. If I didn't already know the story, I don't think I'd have any clue what in the world was happening or why or care one bit about anyone in the I really enjoyed the novels. I've read them a couple times, so I know the story well. When I saw the graphic novels, I was pretty excited, not because I love graphic novels, I'm not a big graphic novel fan usually, but because I LOVE Ted Dekker's stories. Being a big fan, it's unfortunate that I have to say that I think the adaptation is very poorly done. If I didn't already know the story, I don't think I'd have any clue what in the world was happening or why or care one bit about anyone in the story. I will admit, I haven't read a lot of graphic novels (a little bit of Sandman and something by Joss Whedon, I think), so maybe I don't know the medium very well, but it felt choppy and completely void of emotion. If it were twice as long and filled with real content, I would have been absolutely in love.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamin Bradley

    My wife and my brother spent forever trying to get me to read the Circle Trilogy and though I really wanted to, I happen to be a bit of a slow reader and spend most of my time reading non-fiction. However, I also love to read graphic novels and comic books so when I got around to reading these, I was left in awe. The Circle Trilogy is an amazing story. I'm sure it's even better as a book, but the graphic novels are great as well and offer amazing art. I don't think I have seen any other writer do My wife and my brother spent forever trying to get me to read the Circle Trilogy and though I really wanted to, I happen to be a bit of a slow reader and spend most of my time reading non-fiction. However, I also love to read graphic novels and comic books so when I got around to reading these, I was left in awe. The Circle Trilogy is an amazing story. I'm sure it's even better as a book, but the graphic novels are great as well and offer amazing art. I don't think I have seen any other writer do such a good job with creating such a powerfully symbolic fantasy/sci-fi story in relation to Jesus. Absolutely awesome, all three of these books. I don't think there's a graphic novel for Green as of yet, so I may actually have to read that one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    NaTaya Hastings

    This story was okay. It was only the first installment of the story, of course, so it didn't really end with any kind of closure, but it was a decent read. I enjoyed the back and forth between the modern day world and the future (past?). Ha. (That will make sense if you read the story. I also like how it doesn't let you know for sure which leader is being completely honest with Hunter. I mean, yes, the ending of the story leads me to believe that Elyon was the honest one and that the ruler of th This story was okay. It was only the first installment of the story, of course, so it didn't really end with any kind of closure, but it was a decent read. I enjoyed the back and forth between the modern day world and the future (past?). Ha. (That will make sense if you read the story. I also like how it doesn't let you know for sure which leader is being completely honest with Hunter. I mean, yes, the ending of the story leads me to believe that Elyon was the honest one and that the ruler of the black forest is deceitful and evil, but I can't know 100% for sure. I like that. However, parts of the story were simply silly, especially the whole "great romance" bit. ...eyeroll... Absolutely ridiculous. But, as I said, it was okay.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Olivermagnus

    This is the illustrated graphic novel of the first book in the Circle Trilogy by Ted Dekker. It introduces us to Thomas Hunter, a man who becomes trapped between two realities that keep switching on him. Every time he falls asleep, he wakes up in the other. One world is modern day America while the other is a fantasy reality. I read this to fulfill a graphic novel challenge and to be honest, it's not really my cup of tea. I see that the trilogy has gotten great reviews so I recommend anyone who This is the illustrated graphic novel of the first book in the Circle Trilogy by Ted Dekker. It introduces us to Thomas Hunter, a man who becomes trapped between two realities that keep switching on him. Every time he falls asleep, he wakes up in the other. One world is modern day America while the other is a fantasy reality. I read this to fulfill a graphic novel challenge and to be honest, it's not really my cup of tea. I see that the trilogy has gotten great reviews so I recommend anyone who has an interest read them for themselves. I'm sure they are really good but I'm giving it the most generous score I can, given I am not a fan of the genre.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holly Letson

    Thomas Hunter lives in two worlds, and people from each world try to convince him that the other is a dream. So, he is not sure of which is real, and which actually is a dream. In one "reality", he is in Bangkok in 2010, trying to stop a vaccine from becoming a fatal airborne virus. In the other, he is being taught the importance of trust and belief in Elyon. ------------------- Dekker does a wonderful job or creating both worlds, and making them both believable. And, the art is amazing, too. I Thomas Hunter lives in two worlds, and people from each world try to convince him that the other is a dream. So, he is not sure of which is real, and which actually is a dream. In one "reality", he is in Bangkok in 2010, trying to stop a vaccine from becoming a fatal airborne virus. In the other, he is being taught the importance of trust and belief in Elyon. ------------------- Dekker does a wonderful job or creating both worlds, and making them both believable. And, the art is amazing, too. I checked out the trilogy from the library, and I am enjoying them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I actually enjoyed this short graphic novel a lot. It was intriguing, to say the least. Two worlds, two lives, both you can only reach when you fall asleep on the other, and two worlds at stake--with only you as it's savior? Oh, count me in for that interesting book ride. I want to read the novels. Now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I'm thinking I should have read the actual novel before the graphic one, because it felt like there was a lot missing in terms of world building and character development; and not just because of the format. It seems those who did read the book first enjoyed this immensely, so I'm going to get my hands on the full length novel as soon as possible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine Bowles

    I'm sorry to say that I was not thrilled with this one. I don't think the story translated well to the graphic novel format, making this one difficult to finish. I will pick up the next two just to give Dekker the benefit of the doubt, but I am not expecting much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Omar

    Based on the novels of the circle trilogy, I found this graphic novel a bit difficult to follow. Although the plot is a good one, I don't believe it is written well in graphic form. I might have to pick up the novels and read them to compare.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alleluialu

    I've never read a graphic novel before. I liked the story and the moving from one reality to the other, but I really didn't like the portrayal of the characters in their pictures. I guess I like making up my own visual interpretations in my mind.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    It's got good art and I'm really liking the religious tie-ins. Something about it hasn't exactly "wow"ed me, however, even though I'm generally enjoying it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Perfect book to make into a graphic novel. Very similar to how I pictured it would be while reading the novel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    it works better as the normal novel lol

  25. 4 out of 5

    Natalya

    very interesting and left me on the edge of my seat. I enjoy the character development, but some of the side characters are 2D which left me with much to want in that area.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    There's no way to argue that this story isn't off the wall. It is. But, it's really compelling, and the art was great. I enjoyed it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Read Voraciously

    Oddly spiritual while still maintaining an air of adventure and mystery.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Not a huge graphic novel person. But it was fun and an interesting way to read such a great novel.

  29. 4 out of 5

    April

    I can't really rate this until I finish the other 2 novels. Reader beware: You must have ALL three before reading the first. There is NO resolution, but stops in the middle of the story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Third Place A Teen Library

    F DEK circle bk.1

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